HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Why did it happen? (4 msgs / 216 lines)
1) From: happyusx4
Greetings!
I am still trying to get to know my IR2.  I have had some success using a setting of :
320 for 4 min
410 for 3 min
390 for 2 min
for a nice City+ roast.  I've used it on three different coffees with similar success. Until tonight... I roasted a Zimbabwe AA- Dondoni Estate and with 2 minutes to go the beans were dark and oily.  I put it to cool and saved them from burning, but this caught me off guard. 
Is it just a different bean?  I did notice that it gave off significantly more chaff than other beans, could this have caused less airflow and higher temps? 
Is it common that different beans respond so differently to the same pre-sets?
Thanks for your assistance!
Nancy
"still giving Starbucks a run for worst roast"
Greetings!
 
I am still trying to get to know my IR2.  I have had some success using a setting of :
320 for 4 min
410 for 3 min
390 for 2 min
for a nice City+ roast.  I've used it on three different coffees with similar success. Until tonight... I roasted a Zimbabwe AA- Dondoni Estate and with 2 minutes to go the beans were dark and oily.  I put it to cool and saved them from burning, but this caught me off guard. 
 
Is it just a different bean?  I did notice that it gave off significantly more chaff than other beans, could this have caused less airflow and higher temps? 
 
Is it common that different beans respond so differently to the same pre-sets?
 
Thanks for your assistance!
 
Nancy
"still giving Starbucks a run for worst roast"

2) From: Stephen Carey
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Nancy,  again I come to you with only five roasts, but all on the IR2 
and some using that configuration.  Some of the roasts do go to the 
oily stage early, be ready with the cool switch.  I think, for me, 
this is where the senses come in and gut feel.  I haven't lost a 
roast yet.  They haven't all been perfect, but I dial in as described 
earlier in the last week or so.  Change one thing at a time.  I also 
went to a thermometer that has the wire to go into the chamber to get 
a better feel for my temperature.
For my Mexico FTO today, I cut the 410 degree to 400 and cut 10 
seconds off of it.  I then cut 15 seconds off of the 390 final 
cycle.  I know that flies in the face of one thing at a time, but 
they added up to that as the right roast.  I came closer to Full City 
than I wanted, but I have gotten great flavors early in its rest.
It has been suggested that I have been too hard on myself, my 
opinion, lose the tag line.  You don't need that and it probably 
isn't true.  Besides, love and a true solid intention went into your 
beans, that counts for something.
What I did do was do my first few roasts on what people told me were 
forgiving beans, like one from Rwanda.  Maybe some of those are the 
way to play and dial in your machine.  One thing I truly believe is 
that each IR2 is different.  But, so were the flames our grandparents 
used, the types of skillets, all of it.  So there is success out 
there, just keep going, you will hit it.
I will be happy to send you my set ups for my four roasts off line, 
just use my email address.  You can play with them and see if they 
work for you.
All the best from another beginner - something I have to stop telling 
myself.  I am a roaster, not well experienced, but each roast teaches 
me so much.
Take care,
Stephen
At 12:05 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
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Nancy,  again I come to you with only five roasts, but
all on the IR2 and some using that configuration.  Some of the
roasts do go to the oily stage early, be ready with the cool
switch.  I think, for me, this is where the senses come in and gut
feel.  I haven't lost a roast yet.  They haven't all been
perfect, but I dial in as described earlier in the last week or so. 
Change one thing at a time.  I also went to a thermometer that has
the wire to go into the chamber to get a better feel for my
temperature.
For my Mexico FTO today, I cut the 410 degree to 400 and cut 10 seconds
off of it.  I then cut 15 seconds off of the 390 final cycle. 
I know that flies in the face of one thing at a time, but they added up
to that as the right roast.  I came closer to Full City than I
wanted, but I have gotten great flavors early in its rest.
It has been suggested that I have been too hard on myself, my opinion,
lose the tag line.  You don't need that and it probably isn't
true.  Besides, love and a true solid intention went into your
beans, that counts for something.
What I did do was do my first few roasts on what people told me were
forgiving beans, like one from Rwanda.  Maybe some of those are the
way to play and dial in your machine.  One thing I truly believe is
that each IR2 is different.  But, so were the flames our
grandparents used, the types of skillets, all of it.  So there is
success out there, just keep going, you will hit it.
I will be happy to send you my set ups for my four roasts off line, just
use my email address.  You can play with them and see if they work
for you.
All the best from another beginner - something I have to stop telling
myself.  I am a roaster, not well experienced, but each roast
teaches me so much. 
Take care,  
Stephen
At 12:05 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
Greetings!
 
I am still trying to get to know my IR2.  I have had some success
using a setting of :
320 for 4 min
410 for 3 min
390 for 2 min
for a nice City+ roast.  I've used it on three different coffees
with similar success. Until tonight... I roasted a Zimbabwe AA- Dondoni
Estate and with 2 minutes to go the beans were dark and oily.  I put
it to cool and saved them from burning, but this caught me off guard.
 
Is it just a different bean?  I did notice that it gave off
significantly more chaff than other beans, could this have caused less
airflow and higher temps? 
 
Is it common that different beans respond so differently to the same
pre-sets?
 
Thanks for your assistance!
 
Nancy
"still giving Starbucks a run for worst
roast"
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3) From: Aaron
Nancy,  using the factory presets in the I roast is not always the best 
thing to do.  You need to experiment a bit and see what works for you.   
Yah it's an ok starting point to give you a ballpark idea but generally 
will leave you with a batch of starbucks qualified charcoal.
Each bean is different too, what may work well for one bean will cause 
problems with another bean.  This is why you *have* the ability to stop 
a roast early if needed, or prolong the time a little bit if need be.
How much did you roast will play a factor as well.  
Some beans will bounce around nicely and you will have good airflow,  
others will want to clog up and not move around as much and leave you 
doing the tipsy twirl for the last minute of the roast to keep them 
moving, or loosening the cap.  Then there's the matter of chaff,  if a 
bean makes a lot of chaff, that will cut down on airflow through the 
cooker,  reduced airflow will cause both hotter temperatures, and hamper 
bean movement... which also will cause hotter cooking.   There is no 
magic number that will work for all beans.
This is what I use for my I roast 1 that has been a good general purpose 
roasting profile.  THis is using a 5.5 ounce shot into the cooker.
375 for 3 minutes
400 for 3 minutes
430 for 5 minutes but you hit the cool button when the beans get to 
where you want them at.
If ambient temperature is cool, then boost the numbers by 5 degrees each 
to 10 degrees if it is outright cold (ie you are cooking outside and 
it's 45 degrees)
I find that most the times first crack is at the threshold right around 
5:30 to 6:00 (that would be your timer showing 5:30 to 5:00 remaining) 
and when the temp kicks in for the final step, first crack takes off in 
earnest.  I also like to hit cool right around the 7 minute 30 second 
mark to 8 minutes of cooking time.
Not sure if the I2 is going to behave the same for you but might want to 
try it, see if it helps, and if it does, tweak the numbers a bit to get 
them where you need it.
Hope this helps.
Aaron

4) From: Floyd Lozano
For coffees with more chaff, you may want to try backing off on the amount
you roast.  This chaff can indeed block airflow and raise the temperatures
more quickly (when roasting decafs, Tom suggests leaving chaff from a prior
roast in, since decafs produce almost no chaff).  You may want to also
adjust the amount of greens you roast, using less - I have done this with
success in the Freshroast 8+ to slow the otherwise lightspeed approach to
first crack ;)
-F
On 7/29/07, happyusx4  wrote:
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