HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Need help making a big pot of coffe (13 msgs / 267 lines)
1) From: Ronnie Kramer
I'v been asked to make coffe for a meeting tomorrow our new Deputy Director will be attending to introduce himself.  I've never made more than a regular pot.  I use 48oz water and 60g roasted beans (1.27g bean / 1 oz water).  
   
  I have 240 g of beans (unles I roast more today).  How much coffe can this make in a big purculator (sorry, that's what I've been given)?  Can I use the same formula or will it be too strong?
   
  240g beans = 190 oz water 
   
  I think the pot will make up to 42 5-oz cups (210 oz).  So would the 240g be about right for a full pot.
   
  Thanks in advance.
  -ronnie
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

2) From: Justin Marquez
Ronnie - I took a turn at making coffee for our Sunday School class a couple
of times in the past 3 months or so.  We make 42 "cups" in a big ol'
percolator.  I kept the same basic formula of about 1gr per ounce water -  I
ended up doing a 1/2# roast batch specifically for the class brewing about 4
days ahead (for a reasonable rest time). I used all of the 1/2# (i.e. about
227 grams). It went FAST.
While many look down their noses at percolated coffee, it was still plenty
good.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/30/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:
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3) From: Ronnie Kramer
Thanks Justin, That sounds pretty good.  I'll let you know how it turns out.
   
  -rk
Justin Marquez  wrote:
    Ronnie - I took a turn at making coffee for our Sunday School class a couple of times in the past 3 months or so.  We make 42 "cups" in a big ol' percolator.  I kept the same basic formula of about 1gr per ounce water -  I ended up doing a 1/2# roast batch specifically for the class brewing about 4 days ahead (for a reasonable rest time). I used all of the 1/2# ( i.e. about 227 grams). It went FAST.
   
  While many look down their noses at percolated coffee, it was still plenty good.
 
  Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX) 
   
  On 7/30/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:     I'v been asked to make coffe for a meeting tomorrow our new Deputy Director will be attending to introduce himself.  I've never made more than a regular pot.  I use 48oz water and 60g roasted beans (1.27g bean / 1 oz water).  
   
  I have 240 g of beans (unles I roast more today).  How much coffe can this make in a big purculator (sorry, that's what I've been given)?  Can I use the same formula or will it be too strong?
   
  240g beans = 190 oz water 
   
  I think the pot will make up to 42 5-oz cups (210 oz).  So would the 240g be about right for a full pot.
   
  Thanks in advance.
  -ronnie
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX
-- 
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

4) From: raymanowen
I like your coffee/ water ratio!
Omit the coffee but assemble and fill the percolator, and let it perc. When
it stops at ~ 210F, unplug the thing, put the 240g of ground coffee in t=
he
basket. Fill a thermos with the hot water from the spigot, and pour it over
the basket.
Keep doing this for 3-4 minutes or longer, until it's as strong as you like=
.
It sounds like a plan. Just keep rack of the flavor and strength of the
coffee. Remove the basket and tube but don't plug it back in unless the
coffee doesn't "move" (fat chance), and starts getting too cool.
The cylindrical heater in the center will heat until its thermostat is
satisfied, unless there is a "keep warm" switch on the pot. Either way,
don't leave it heating for long.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

5) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
2 tablespoons coarse ground coffee per 8 oz. water for perc should be 
ok.  An important point is to use good water (filtered if not sure).
Len

6) From: Ronnie Kramer
Oh, that's almost like cheating.  I like it.
raymanowen wrote:  I like your coffee/ water ratio!
Omit the coffee but assemble and fill the percolator, and let it perc. When it stops at ~ 210F, unplug the thing, put the 240g of ground coffee in the basket. Fill a thermos with the hot water from the spigot, and pour it over the basket.
Keep doing this for 3-4 minutes or longer, until it's as strong as you like. 
It sounds like a plan. Just keep rack of the flavor and strength of the coffee. Remove the basket and tube but don't plug it back in unless the coffee doesn't "move" (fat chance), and starts getting too cool. 
The cylindrical heater in the center will heat until its thermostat is satisfied, unless there is a "keep warm" switch on the pot. Either way, don't leave it heating for long.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa! 
Got Grinder?
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

7) From: Ronnie Kramer
Yea, I'm going to bring filtered water from home.  The stuff in the office has funny taste.
CoffeeRoastersClub  wrote:  2 tablespoons coarse ground coffee per 8 oz. water for perc should be 
ok. An important point is to use good water (filtered if not sure).
LenRonnie Kramer
Austin, TX

8) From: Robert Joslin
Thanks RayO.  I was going to suggest something like that, but your idea is
much better.  Ronnie I've done it before using a muslin bag to contain the
coffee (one used in straining juices for canning) and haul the bag out afte=
r
checking the brew a couple of times for strength. it made a damn fine pot o
coffee!  Good luck.  Please let us know how it works out.  (Ray, you are on=
e
clever fellow!)
On 7/30/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:
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9) From: Scott Marquardt
I'm way too late to this thread to do you any good, but something that's
been discussed before -- and never proven, to my knowledge -- is the idea of
letting the percolator perc the water up to about 140 degrees before adding
the coffee. This would result in a briefer duration of percolation for the
grind, in theory preventing over-extraction.
- Scott
On 7/30/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:
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10) From: Justin Marquez
Isn't the problem that the heating element in the bottom (which boils a
little water and forces it up the tube) also boils whatever coffee has been
previously extracted until the overall brew temp shuts down the heater?
Now, having said all that, our Sunday School class coffee urn is a
percolator.  I worried a little about that the first time I brought my
homeroasted and made the coffee in it. The coffee has never really tasted
"boiled" or "scorched" or even overextracted to me. When I have done the
homeroasted in it, I have always gotten very positive comments and it
disappears completely during the early part of the class.
It might be interesting to try the suggestion you make and to see if I can
tell a significant flavor difference.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/31/07, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
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11) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
OK so now that we have had this discussion 
    what is the preferred method for brewing large amounts of coffee? 
is their a TV quality large brewer on the market?  Any one with
experence out there?
 
Dennis

12) From: Homeroaster
I've made coffee for large groups before using a large stainless pot (20-30 
quart) of boiling water, couple of manual pourover drip pots, a couple of 
thermos pots for storage as I brew it.  It's not a system where you can make 
it and walk away, but it showcases great coffee better than making a large 
urn of something and losing most of the delicate flavors.  The last homebrew 
campout, I brewed over 17 gallons of coffee with this system and no 
complaints.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

13) From: Scott Marquardt
Every week I do two pourovers into 1.5 gal Fetco (Luxus) thermal containers.
I use a Melitta 103 cone and a polyester felt cone I sewed to be about 10"
up the long side.
I only do the decaf pot half full.
In both cases, I grind the proper amount of beans and pour them into a
plastic pitcher (I swear it's nylon) that has a pint of hot water in it. I
add another quart of hot water and stir vigorously to pre-infuse (bloom
suppression). I add another quarter of water or so, stir quickly (at this
point we're about 30 seconds into extraction), and pour into the cone atop
the Fetco. I then pour additional water, as much as possible, and then
scrape the inside surface of the filter with a wedge spatula (which will
accelerate throughput).
Once the first major pour has mostly disappeared (to the accompaniment of
casual stirring and scraping of sides), I do another full pour, filling the
cone as much as practical. Still stirring, I let this go through as well,
and follow with a third such pour. When brewing's done, I top it off with
suitable temperature water to make for a good serving temperature.
Although I vary from this fundamental method a bit from time to time, the
approach takes advantage of the 5 micron polyester felt's rapid throughput.
It would be impossible to do this with paper -- completely impossible.
As you'd expect, I had to dial in the grind to suit the method. It helped
that I came by a commercial (restaurant type) Bunn grinder on the cheap,
which yields marvelous consistency.
The method is a mild hassle. The poly's not easy to clean. But the result is
great coffee.
Something else I do, since I want to serve it fresh but I can't always brew
immediately before the service ends: I'll brew it into a cold Fetco, and add
some cold water to that. This leaves the coffee lukewarm until the service
ends. At that point I add boiling water to top it off, and bring it to
serving temperature. This helps slow the rate of brew staling, because the
temperature of the coffee left sitting in the pot isn't very high. I've
found this to be a very effective method to retard degradation of already
brewed but not-as-yet-served coffee. I'd recommend it without qualification.
HTH
- Scott
On 7/31/07, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
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