HomeRoast Digest


Topic: ziplock bags (was Re: +Mason jar lids with quality degas (6 msgs / 418 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_388497703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Dave, I am where you are.  I have an IR2 and I haven't roasted more 
than a batch in a day.  So, at any given time I have two days going, 
maybe three.  Meaning one is not even 24 hours, part of another is 
between 24 and 48, and part of the last one is just over that.  I 
use, now don't gasp, I am new to this, plastic containers until my 
valve bags arrive.  Somehow I ordered just one when I meant to order 
many more.  I thought it was a unit of 25 or something so I just put 
1 down - my error.
So, for now the bags will have to do - they should arrive 
Wednesday.  I do want the bags for the winter when I might do two or 
three batches of 5 to 6 ounces each in a day.  But for our use - 
meaning, only me in this house, the system works fine.  When I do 
make more than just for me I am making it for 2 or 3 people and I can 
do that with whatever I have on hand.  Plus, for emergencies I have 
my stash of all sorts of beans that were too few to roast.  They are 
a bizarre blend.  The only thing I do is divide them up by types of 
roasts so the final roast should be okay - remember, I am saying this 
with ZERO experience in this area, but I am learning that a lot of 
this is to try it and see what you get.  Learn from there.
My only suggestion, from what I have read here and other places is 
the valve bags, but if you are using your coffee up like I am you 
should be okay.  My guess, though, is that all of us, one day, will 
need something bigger for larger scale roasts or the same bean 
roasted a few times in one day.  Even then the bags should work.  But 
the jars may hold more, I just don't know.
I would think that you could put the amount of beans you usually use 
per brewing, pressing, whatever, of the coffee in a single use.  That 
would be convenient.
Just my thoughts.
Stephen
At 08:04 PM 7/30/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_388497703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Dave, I am where you are.  I have an IR2 and I haven't
roasted more than a batch in a day.  So, at any given time I have
two days going, maybe three.  Meaning one is not even 24 hours, part
of another is between 24 and 48, and part of the last one is just over
that.  I use, now don't gasp, I am new to this, plastic containers
until my valve bags arrive.  Somehow I ordered just one when I meant
to order many more.  I thought it was a unit of 25 or something so I
just put 1 down - my error.
So, for now the bags will have to do - they should arrive
Wednesday.  I do want the bags for the winter when I might do two or
three batches of 5 to 6 ounces each in a day.  But for our use -
meaning, only me in this house, the system works fine.  When I do
make more than just for me I am making it for 2 or 3 people and I can do
that with whatever I have on hand.  Plus, for emergencies I have my
stash of all sorts of beans that were too few to roast.  They are a
bizarre blend.  The only thing I do is divide them up by types of
roasts so the final roast should be okay - remember, I am saying this
with ZERO experience in this area, but I am learning that a lot of this
is to try it and see what you get.  Learn from there.
My only suggestion, from what I have read here and other places is the
valve bags, but if you are using your coffee up like I am you should be
okay.  My guess, though, is that all of us, one day, will need
something bigger for larger scale roasts or the same bean roasted a few
times in one day.  Even then the bags should work.  But the
jars may hold more, I just don't know.
I would think that you could put the amount of beans you usually use per
brewing, pressing, whatever, of the coffee in a single use.  That
would be convenient.
Just my thoughts.
Stephen
At 08:04 PM 7/30/2007, you wrote:
I usually use 8-oz mason jars.
Staling is a non-issue for me because
I'm still using the Fresh Roast Plus 8 that I got when I started
roasting 18 months ago, and I can't roast in enough volume to have
to
worry about long-term storage.
However, I don't have very many jars, and I sometimes can't find
one,
in which case I just use a ziplock bag, squeezing as much air out as
I
can. Can anyone see a problem with this storage method? It seems
like
it would be at least as good as a mason jar.
-Dave
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_388497703==.ALT--

2) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_3751781==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Scott,
I see your point.  I have only done six roasts and all have "hit 
their peak" or "sweet spot" between days 1 and 3.  I haven't had the 
opportunity to try any that needed a longer rest time, though I hope to.
Money is an issue for me right now.  So, I am watching what how I 
spend it.  That is why I hoped the valved bags would work until I 
could afford some sort of vacuum sealer of a much higher 
caliber.  Based on your experience do you think I can get away with a 
bag for a 10 day rest?  Or, is something better or more effective needed.
Thank you.
At 09:52 AM 7/31/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_3751781==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Scott,
I see your point.  I have only done six roasts and all have
"hit their peak" or "sweet spot" between days 1 and
3.  I haven't had the opportunity to try any that needed a longer
rest time, though I hope to.
Money is an issue for me right now.  So, I am watching what how I
spend it.  That is why I hoped the valved bags would work until I
could afford some sort of vacuum sealer of a much higher caliber. 
Based on your experience do you think I can get away with a bag for a 10
day rest?  Or, is something better or more effective
needed.
Thank you.
At 09:52 AM 7/31/2007, you wrote:
I'm hearing "small batches
that get used up fast" quite a bit in this conversation.
 
In other conversations, I've heard a lot about how, for example, the
Idido is excellent when rested about 10 days.
 
If beans need to rest a long time before they're optimal, they need to be
in a good container that prevents staling. If beans are used up quickly,
it'd be handy if they're something that doesn't need a long rest. 
 
Something like that.    ;-)
 
But I think not worrying about staling 'cause beans get used fast is
probably not sound. True, the beans might not have time to stale much --
but that reaction is still occuring.
 
It's like the guy who was low on gas but 30 miles from the nearest
station, so he drove darned fast to get there before he'd run
out.    ;-)
 
- S
 
On 7/30/07, Rick Copple
<rick> wrote:
Stephen Carey wrote:
> My only suggestion, from what I have read here and other places
is the
> valve bags, but if you are using your coffee up like I am you
should be
> okay.  My guess, though, is that all of us, one day, will
need something
> bigger for larger scale roasts or the same bean roasted a few
times in 
> one day.  Even then the bags should work.  But the
jars may hold more, I
> just don't know.
>
> I would think that you could put the amount of beans you usually
use per
> brewing, pressing, whatever, of the coffee in a single
use.  That would 
> be convenient.
I've used the valve bags mostly. At first, used mason jars, but saw
the
value of allowing the CO2 to escape, so have been using them ever
since.
I think for small batches that get used up fast as both of yours
seems 
to be, the difference isn't going to matter much one way or the
other,
as long as you allow the CO2 out within the first four hours of
the
roast (I believe that is the minimum as I recall from reading
SM).
But I generally roast 2# a week, and store them in valve bags, and
they
stay good and fresh up on my cabinet shelf until I've used them
up.
Anything else would be too much work for my taste. :)
Oh, I'm also the only coffee drinker in my house, though occasionally
my 
18 year-old-son will take a cup. I'm sure I get close to that
healthful
four cups a day average. :)
--
Rick Copple
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_3751781==.ALT--

3) From:
how old are you...
---- Michael I  wrote: 
<Snip>

4) From:
no 62...
---- "True wrote: 
<Snip>

5) From:
it has a lot michael...
---- Michael I  wrote: 
<Snip>

6) From: george
Sorry if this becomes a double post.  I have tried sending it several
times and it never seems to get posted.
I think I have the BEST method of storing coffee.  Just go to the place
that the green coffee cherries ares processed at.  Just as the workers are
going to fill the very first shipping bag, take out enough to roast a
single pot or cup of coffee.  Use your favorite roaster and profile to
roast your FRESH beans.  Then drink the whole pot within 5 minutes or
less.  For the next roast, just find another processing plant (preferably
in another country or at least a different growing region) and repeat the
above steps.  No ziplock bags, no vacuum sealers with bags or jars, no -10
degree deep freezer,  no Valve bags.  Nothing special needed for storage.
This will get rid of any controversy in the best storage technique for
your greens.  Only storage area needed is your digestive system and how
fast you can process the coffee yourself.
GJM
--


HomeRoast Digest