HomeRoast Digest


Topic: slightly OT - odd brewing method, really odd (4 msgs / 295 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Okay, this is a new one for me.  My partner's parents got something 
called the Coffee Toddy Maker - really.  What you do, if I have this 
correct for it hasn't been used yet.  It was an anniversary gift from 
their daughter.  So, what you is take one pound of ground coffee and 
put it in this plastic container, which must have some sort of 
filter.  I haven't seen it yet.
Then you pour water (I guess room temperature) to the top of the 
container with the coffee in it.  Then, (I am not making this up) you 
let the mixture site for 12 hours,at which put you remove a stopper 
and let the coffee mixture filter into another container - a decanter.
Then it goes in the fridge.  I don't know if that is where it has 
been for the 12 hours or not preceding this part, they had it on the 
counter just sitting.  Then, once in the decanter it stays in the 
refrigerator until needed.
When you need it you take one part concentrate to three parts boiling water.
It is suppose to take away the acidity (read flavor) and oils (read 
more flavor).
I will admit that I am knew to home roasting but wouldn't this ruin 
the roast?  Or am I missing something about the process?
Thank you.  Oh, I get to try some tonight with cake and ice cream for 
a little celebration.

2) From: Randall Nortman
This is the "cold brew" method, and is very popular throughout Latin
America.  I used to do it a lot myself, as it is very convenient and
does, in fact, produce a very smooth brew if you use decent enough
beans.  You will lose a lot of origin character this way, so don't
waste the really great beans on it.  It works particularly well for
milk drinks (esp. with a dark roast), and in the morning there's no
easier way to have a decent cup.  My morning routine used to be that I
dumped some cold brew concentrate from the fridge into a mug of milk,
and heated the whole thing in the microwave for a minute.  Quick,
easy, and produces a very drinkable pseudo-latte.  (My current morning
routine is almost the same, except with an Aeropress in place of the
cold brew, so it takes a bit longer and is much more hands-on.)
It is also a nice way to provide a large quantity of decent coffee for
a big group with minimum fuss.  You can make it well in advance, then
you just need a source of hot water when it comes time to serve.  It
makes what the average person considers really good coffee, because it
turns out rather smooth and inoffensive -- bland by connoisseurs'
standards, but that's what most people want.  Way better than stale,
burnt swill from a percolator urn.  It makes mediocre beans drinkable,
but it's still better with decent beans.  As I said before, don't
waste the really good beans on it.
The Toddy company popularized the method in the States, and their
brewer is convenient, but you can do it without that contraption.  One
popular method is to put the grounds in a clean white cotton sock or
pantyhose, leave that soaking in the water overnight, then just lift
out the sock and optionally squeeze the excess water out.  You can
also just put water and grounds in any old pitcher/container and then
pour it through a paper coffee filter in the morning.  Anything that
separates grounds from water will work.  Different variations may
result in somewhat more oils remaining in the concentrate, which could
be good or bad depending on your priorities.
On Wed, Aug 01, 2007 at 12:46:01PM -0400, Stephen Carey wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Larry Johnson
I have one of these devices, Stephen, that I bought years ago at a local
cooking equip store (The Rolling Pin). It was during my search for better
coffee, before I found out about homeroasting. Yes, you pour room temp (or
cool, actually) water onto the pound of grounds, stir, and let it sit on the
counter for ~12 hrs, soaking the grounds in what seems like a massive
overextraction. Then you pull the cork out of the bottom and drain the
"coffee concentrate" into a container which you seal and store in the
fridge. It sounds awful but it actually works pretty well, especially for
iced coffee. The coffee is kind of flat, though, compared to what you and I
have become accustomed to with homeroast. I didn't care for hot coffee made
from the "concentrate", but iced coffee from it wasn't bad.
That said; I've never been able to bring myself to risk a pound of my
homeroast in it, so I can't comment on what that's like. When I think of the
Toddy (which is seldom) I think of it as a way to make iced coffee from
grocery store grounds. Let us know if you try it; tell us what you think.
On 8/1/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.  -
Walter Bagehot

4) From: Stephen Carey
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Wow, this is cool.  I will let you know how it turns out 
tonight.  Maybe I will take a pound of Costa Rican coffee I got when 
I was down there a few weeks ago.  It is stored well, needs to be 
ground, but it can be my contribution and it will be better than what 
they usually buy - store brand.  They won't be offended because they 
have liked the coffee we have brought them before from when we go down there.
I will grind it shortly before I leave here.  I may be pleasantly surprised.
I do have to say that in all the time I have spent in Costa Rica and 
all the people's home I have been a guest in I have never seen this 
way of brewing.  Usually it is an off the shelf drip brewer or a 
piece of wood, holding a cloth filter, the cup goes underneath and 
the coffee runs through the filter to make a very fine cup of 
coffee.  Of course, the friend we go to most is the roaster for one 
of the coffee shops we like down there.
So, I should be more careful and not be cynical about things until I 
know for sure through my own experience.  Kind of embarrasses, I 
sounded so stuck up, but it just caught me off guard.  I haven't seen 
it on SM's site - yet!
Will let you know how it turn out.
At 01:05 PM 8/1/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Wow, this is cool.  I will let you know how it turns
out tonight.  Maybe I will take a pound of Costa Rican coffee I got
when I was down there a few weeks ago.  It is stored well, needs to
be ground, but it can be my contribution and it will be better than what
they usually buy - store brand.  They won't be offended because they
have liked the coffee we have brought them before from when we go down
there.  
I will grind it shortly before I leave here.  I may be pleasantly
surprised.
I do have to say that in all the time I have spent in Costa Rica and all
the people's home I have been a guest in I have never seen this way of
brewing.  Usually it is an off the shelf drip brewer or a piece of
wood, holding a cloth filter, the cup goes underneath and the coffee runs
through the filter to make a very fine cup of coffee.  Of course,
the friend we go to most is the roaster for one of the coffee shops we
like down there.  
So, I should be more careful and not be cynical about things until I know
for sure through my own experience.  Kind of embarrasses, I sounded
so stuck up, but it just caught me off guard.  I haven't seen it on
SM's site - yet!
Will let you know how it turn out.
At 01:05 PM 8/1/2007, you wrote:
This is the "cold
brew" method, and is very popular throughout Latin
America.  I used to do it a lot myself, as it is very convenient
and
does, in fact, produce a very smooth brew if you use decent enough
beans.  You will lose a lot of origin character this way, so
don't
waste the really great beans on it.  It works particularly well
for
milk drinks (esp. with a dark roast), and in the morning there's no
easier way to have a decent cup.  My morning routine used to be that
I
dumped some cold brew concentrate from the fridge into a mug of
milk,
and heated the whole thing in the microwave for a minute. 
Quick,
easy, and produces a very drinkable pseudo-latte.  (My current
morning
routine is almost the same, except with an Aeropress in place of the
cold brew, so it takes a bit longer and is much more hands-on.)
It is also a nice way to provide a large quantity of decent coffee
for
a big group with minimum fuss.  You can make it well in advance,
then
you just need a source of hot water when it comes time to serve. 
It
makes what the average person considers really good coffee, because
it
turns out rather smooth and inoffensive -- bland by connoisseurs'
standards, but that's what most people want.  Way better than
stale,
burnt swill from a percolator urn.  It makes mediocre beans
drinkable,
but it's still better with decent beans.  As I said before,
don't
waste the really good beans on it.
The Toddy company popularized the method in the States, and their
brewer is convenient, but you can do it without that contraption. 
One
popular method is to put the grounds in a clean white cotton sock or
pantyhose, leave that soaking in the water overnight, then just lift
out the sock and optionally squeeze the excess water out.  You
can
also just put water and grounds in any old pitcher/container and
then
pour it through a paper coffee filter in the morning.  Anything
that
separates grounds from water will work.  Different variations
may
result in somewhat more oils remaining in the concentrate, which
could
be good or bad depending on your priorities.
On Wed, Aug 01, 2007 at 12:46:01PM -0400, Stephen Carey wrote:
> Okay, this is a new one for me.  My partner's parents got
something 
> called the Coffee Toddy Maker - really.  What you do, if I have
this 
> correct for it hasn't been used yet.  It was an anniversary
gift from 
> their daughter.  So, what you is take one pound of ground
coffee and 
> put it in this plastic container, which must have some sort of 
> filter.  I haven't seen it yet.
> 
> Then you pour water (I guess room temperature) to the top of the
> container with the coffee in it.  Then, (I am not making this
up) you 
> let the mixture site for 12 hours,at which put you remove a stopper
> and let the coffee mixture filter into another container - a
decanter.
> 
> Then it goes in the fridge.  I don't know if that is where it
has 
> been for the 12 hours or not preceding this part, they had it on the
> counter just sitting.  Then, once in the decanter it stays in
the 
> refrigerator until needed.
> 
> When you need it you take one part concentrate to three parts
boiling water.
> 
> It is suppose to take away the acidity (read flavor) and oils (read
> more flavor).
> 
> I will admit that I am knew to home roasting but wouldn't this ruin
> the roast?  Or am I missing something about the process?
> 
> Thank you.  Oh, I get to try some tonight with cake and ice
cream for 
> a little celebration.
> 
>
> homeroast mailing list
>
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