HomeRoast Digest


Topic: use one type bean to learn (13 msgs / 690 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
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Hi, all.  When I got my new machine, it came with a number of quarter 
pound bags of green beans, all at a great price.  The problem, I 
think, is I have is I can't get enough roasts out of one bag to truly 
dial it in.  Instead, up until my 1lb. bags arrived, I was using one 
"recipe" and stretching it or squeezing it in to make it work on many 
types of beans.
Now that I have my pound bags I am sticking to just one type until I 
am very happy with it.  The last bean I roasted, though in no way 
perfect, is the one I will work on for a while since I have more than 
a pound of it.  Rather than go to an entirely different bean I want 
to change the one thing that I "think" will make it a better roast, 
the time of its last cycle.  Then, if that isn't it, change only one 
thing again, so I can truly know what makes the change.
Then, I plan on moving to another one pound bag and working on 
that.  I want to do this before I roast any of the expensive Panama 
beans I ordered the other night.  My goal is to understand the types 
of beans to the types of roasts.
I believe I got confused when I received the multiple quarter pound 
bags in my first order.  Despite what I had read I figured I was 
supposed to play around with these (besides, I was inpatient).  The 
time wasn't really wasted, for I checked with you all, I read about 
the bean, and tried my best, but never had enough beans to get one 
bean just right.  In the end, I should have ordered a 5 pound bag of 
a bean or two and worked on just it (them) until I understood my 
machine better, and many other variables, and mostly, how one bean 
can need to be roasted much differently than the bean from the time before.
I feel foolish for not figuring it out or not believing what I read, 
I can be slow sometime.  But, I have it now.  I am working on one 
bean getting it right, and then doing the same thing for another bean 
and so on.  Then I can take real advantage of the quarter pound bags 
and the variety they provide.
I know none of this is new, it is in the books, on different sites, 
but it does show, at least for me, how impatience can confuse the student. 
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Hi, all.  When I got my new machine, it came with a number of
quarter pound bags of green beans, all at a great price.  The
problem, I think, is I have is I can't get enough roasts out of one bag
to truly dial it in.  Instead, up until my 1lb. bags arrived, I was
using one "recipe" and stretching it or squeezing it in to make
it work on many types of beans.
Now that I have my pound bags I am sticking to just one type until I am
very happy with it.  The last bean I roasted, though in no way
perfect, is the one I will work on for a while since I have more than a
pound of it.  Rather than go to an entirely different bean I want to
change the one thing that I "think" will make it a better
roast, the time of its last cycle.  Then, if that isn't it, change
only one thing again, so I can truly know what makes the change.
Then, I plan on moving to another one pound bag and working on
that.  I want to do this before I roast any of the expensive Panama
beans I ordered the other night.  My goal is to understand the types
of beans to the types of roasts.  
I believe I got confused when I received the multiple quarter pound bags
in my first order.  Despite what I had read I figured I was supposed
to play around with these (besides, I was inpatient).  The time
wasn't really wasted, for I checked with you all, I read about the bean,
and tried my best, but never had enough beans to get one bean just
right.  In the end, I should have ordered a 5 pound bag of a bean or
two and worked on just it (them) until I understood my machine better,
and many other variables, and mostly, how one bean can need to be roasted
much differently than the bean from the time before.
I feel foolish for not figuring it out or not believing what I read, I
can be slow sometime.  But, I have it now.  I am working on one
bean getting it right, and then doing the same thing for another bean and
so on.  Then I can take real advantage of the quarter pound bags and
the variety they provide.  
I know none of this is new, it is in the books, on different
sites, but it does show, at least for me, how impatience can confuse the
student.
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2) From: Justin Marquez
 But you are better now...?
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
(Yeah, this is a tough crowd....)
On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: dvarona
I agree... as long as you get the right good bean.
I used this approach with my Gene Cafe roaster and a Colombian bean from =
SM's. However, my current conclusion is that I don't really like the bean=
. It took me three or four pounds of trying before I switched to somethin=
g else; I initially thought that the homeroasting thing was overblown sin=
ce all my results were mediocre at best.
I don't know if it was an old lot, or just my quirky preferences, or that=
 the bean required a different profile than the one I was using; but afte=
r I switched to other beans I found that I was able to get some really go=
od outcomes. I did learn a few things with the Colombian; but sometimes t=
he bean is the problem.
(Alas, I do have narrow preferences in coffee: clean cup, full body, low =
acidity, not dark roasted, intensely flavored. Even the best espresso tas=
tes unpleasantly sour to me, and I avoid Starbucks because of their dark-=
roast flavor. I seem to do best with Indonesians, but I've also had good =
luck with some others. I tend to add milk products because it tames the a=
cidity.)
So if you're not getting good results with your larger supply, try switch=
ing to another bean with the same approach.
--dv

4) From: Stephen Carey
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As soon as I hit send I wondered how long it would be before I got 
called out on that one!  This has to be some sort of record!
At 03:43 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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As soon as I hit send I wondered how long it would be before
I got called out on that one!  This has to be some sort of
record!
At 03:43 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote:
 But you are better
now...?
 
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX) 
 
(Yeah, this is a tough crowd....)
 
On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
 (besides, I was inpatient).  
 
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5) From: Hans von Sichart
bah, just roast away. who needs a system anyways. i follow these simple rules:
1. all beans from SM are good.
2. even a bad homeorast is better then anything from the super market
(it's fresh! it's unique! it is foreign! i made it myslef! it is in my
cup right now!)
3. making mistakes inspires experimentation inspires innovation
4. roasting a three pound bag with a small roaster 150 grams at a time
and then drinking it all by yourself can get REALLY boring.
5. i believe in developing a "feeling" for the right roasting curve.
it will happen eventually. it better happen soon!
to second crack and bejond:
+ hans
- - -
On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
new cell: 408 806 2253

6) From: Brett Mason
excellent Hans!  I absolutely agree....
I am new too - I've only roasted about 450 pounds so far, and have done so
over the last 4 years.  Your method sounds like mine, and has led to many
refinements.  The best takeaway here is, Go Roast!  Then refine...
Brett
On 8/2/07, Hans von Sichart  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Stephen Carey
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You have a good point about boring and also about developing a sense 
of the curve.  I believe our senses can really be of great help to us 
in our roasting, almost as much as everything else we have to do to 
make a good roast.  Though, I would still like to get one roast down, 
see how my senses really do and learn more about my machine.
I will say, that even roasts that haven't turned out perfect have all 
been better than anything from a can, a diner, a restaurant and most 
of my friends (sorry, but true).
And the two orders of beans I have coming in take me around the 
world, the one that got here the other day took me to Central 
America, the 1/4 pound bags that came with the roaster took me to 
places I wouldn't have thought of, like Rwanda - still one of my 
favorites - to the point where I ordered more from there.
Then there is the container from the bags with too few beans to 
roast, just tossing them in there as was suggested.  I can't wait 
until I get a few more kinds in there and just roast away - I should 
taste all sorts of flavors.
All the best,
Stephen
At 06:29 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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You have a good point about boring and also about developing
a sense of the curve.  I believe our senses can really be of great
help to us in our roasting, almost as much as everything else we have to
do to make a good roast.  Though, I would still like to get one
roast down, see how my senses really do and learn more about my
machine.
I will say, that even roasts that haven't turned out perfect have all
been better than anything from a can, a diner, a restaurant and most of
my friends (sorry, but true).
And the two orders of beans I have coming in take me around the world,
the one that got here the other day took me to Central America, the 1/4
pound bags that came with the roaster took me to places I wouldn't have
thought of, like Rwanda - still one of my favorites - to the point where
I ordered more from there.
Then there is the container from the bags with too few beans to roast,
just tossing them in there as was suggested.  I can't wait until I
get a few more kinds in there and just roast away - I should taste all
sorts of flavors.
All the best,
Stephen
At 06:29 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote:
bah, just roast away. who needs
a system anyways. i follow these simple rules:
1. all beans from SM are good.
2. even a bad homeorast is better then anything from the super
market
(it's fresh! it's unique! it is foreign! i made it myslef! it is in
my
cup right now!)
3. making mistakes inspires experimentation inspires innovation
4. roasting a three pound bag with a small roaster 150 grams at a
time
and then drinking it all by yourself can get REALLY boring.
5. i believe in developing a "feeling" for the right roasting
curve.
it will happen eventually. it better happen soon!
to second crack and bejond:
+ hans
- - -
On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey <steve> wrote:
>
>  As soon as I hit send I wondered how long it would be before I
got called
> out on that one!  This has to be some sort of record!
>
>
>
>  At 03:43 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote:
>
>  But you are better now...?
>
>  Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
>  Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
>
>  (Yeah, this is a tough crowd....)
>
>
>  On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey <steve
> > wrote:
>   (besides, I was inpatient).
>
>
-- 
new cell: 408 806 2253
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_122474812==.ALT--

8) From: raymanowen
" as long as you get the right good bean... [Sweet Maria's- all they have]
  Even the best espresso tastes unpleasantly sour to me..."[Misteaks are
sour. Espresso brewed coffee is never sour. Good espresso is Fabulous. The
Best is through the roof, almost beyond description.]
The Yuppie Dump coffee shops don't have a clientele that actually like
coffee. They always have honey, for a stab at something natural- what a
waste- cane sugar, blue, pink and yellow fake sweeteners. Cream, half and
half and two degrees of reduced-fat milk, and a casein-based substitute for
Elmer's glue for powdered fake cream.
We know where you've been getting your coffeelike drinks- you've been dealt
dreck at every turn by employees whose interests lie only in pushing the
right button when it's convenient, payday is Thursday, the boss is a and
pilfering the till.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Your own espresso won't be sour-

9) From: Les
Brett said,  "I've only roasted about 450 pounds so far."  I am getting
close to 3,000 pounds of homeroast under the belt!  Hans makes a good
point.  However, I do concur that starting with a bean that just isn't your
cup of coffee would be frustrating.  That is why I always steer newbies to
dialing in with a good Mexican Coffee.  It has a wide latitude of roast.  It
may not be outstanding in their opinion, but I have never had a person I
trained complain that it wasn't real good coffee.  I always advice ordering
the sample packs too.  You just never know what is going to be good to you
unless you try them.  I discovered the Timor in a sample pack.  I don't
think I would have ordered it, but it is one coffee I really like.  Panama
coffees are the same, it was a sample pack!
Les
On 8/2/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: dvarona
I'm not saying the bean was of low quality, it just turned out to not be =
right for me.
When I'm saying "unpleasantly sour to me", the emphasis is on "to me". Th=
ere is always some acidity in coffee, and I've found that I have a low to=
lerance for it. The best espresso in NYC is rumored to be at Café Grump=
y in Chelsea, so I went and tried one. I could definitely tell it was muc=
h more refined and smooth than Starbucks et al., but still had a sourness=
 (acidity) that I didn't like.
All the other aspects of that cup were amazing: very long aftertaste, no =
heavy dark roast, low bitterness-- but the acidity is still in front. It'=
s probably because the cup is so concentrated.
So "heavenly" for you isn't necessarily so for me. It was the best espres=
so I've ever had, but not extremely enjoyable.
--dv

11) From: Stephen Carey
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Les, the sample packs brought me the Rwanda coffees, which I really 
like and had never had.  They also turned me onto the large selection 
of both Mexican and Panamanian coffees.  Though, I did find it 
frustrating to dial in on one, for I would run out.  For that I have 
been using, by chance, a Mexican FTO that I ordered.  Go figure.  I 
like it, it has some give to it, it is a bit forgiving, and I am 
getting very close to what I really prefer.
Sound advice both you and Brett gave.
At 10:53 AM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Les, the sample packs brought me the Rwanda coffees, which I
really like and had never had.  They also turned me onto the large
selection of both Mexican and Panamanian coffees.  Though, I did
find it frustrating to dial in on one, for I would run out.  For
that I have been using, by chance, a Mexican FTO that I ordered.  Go
figure.  I like it, it has some give to it, it is a bit forgiving,
and I am getting very close to what I really prefer.  
Sound advice both you and Brett gave.
At 10:53 AM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
Brett said,  "I've
only roasted about 450 pounds so far."  I am getting close to
3,000 pounds of homeroast under the belt!  Hans makes a good
point.  However, I do concur that starting with a bean that just
isn't your cup of coffee would be frustrating.  That is why I always
steer newbies to dialing in with a good Mexican Coffee.  It has a
wide latitude of roast.  It may not be outstanding in their opinion,
but I have never had a person I trained complain that it wasn't real good
coffee.  I always advice ordering the sample packs too.  You
just never know what is going to be good to you unless you try
them.  I discovered the Timor in a sample pack.  I don't think
I would have ordered it, but it is one coffee I really like.  Panama
coffees are the same, it was a sample pack! 
 
Les
 
On 8/2/07, Brett Mason
<homeroast>
wrote:
excellent Hans!  I absolutely agree....
I am new too - and have done so over the last 4 years.  Your
method sounds like mine, and has led to many refinements.  The best
takeaway here is, Go Roast!  Then refine... 
Brett 
On 8/2/07, Hans von Sichart
<vonsichart >
wrote: 
bah, just roast away. who needs a system anyways. i follow these
simple rules:
1. all beans from SM are good. 
2. even a bad homeorast is better then anything from the super
market
(it's fresh! it's unique! it is foreign! i made it myslef! it is in
my 
cup right now!)
3. making mistakes inspires experimentation inspires innovation 
4. roasting a three pound bag with a small roaster 150 grams at a
time
and then drinking it all by yourself can get REALLY boring. 
5. i believe in developing a "feeling" for the right
roasting curve.
it will happen eventually. it better happen soon!
to second crack and bejond:
+ hans
- - -
On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey <
steve>
wrote:
>
>  As soon as I hit send I wondered how long it would be
before I got called
> out on that one!  This has to be some sort of record! 
>
>
>
>  At 03:43 PM 8/2/2007, you wrote: 
>
>  But you are better now...?
>
>  Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
>  Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
>
>  (Yeah, this is a tough crowd....) 
>
>
>  On 8/2/07, Stephen Carey <
steve
> > wrote:
>   (besides, I was inpatient).
>
>
--
new cell: 408 806 2253
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings-- 
Cheers,
Brett
http://homeroast.freeservers.com
--=====================_11275453==.ALT--

12) From: Rick Copple
dvarona wrote:
<Snip>
Sounds like the Java Prince would be a favorite coffee of yours, then. 
I'm not that sensitive to acidity, but I really like that coffee just 
straight up, no blend. Of course, I've rarely found a blend that I like 
as much as the SO. But, the Java Prince is one coffee that most use for 
blending, has a very low acidity, bass kind of taste, but still very 
flavorful.
I think I still have about 5 pounds of that in my stash. :)
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.copple.us/blog/

13) From: raymanowen
"the acidity is still in front - because the cup is so concentrated."
No comment -ro
On 8/3/07, dvarona  wrote:
<Snip>
umpy
<Snip>
's
<Snip>
]
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
or
<Snip>
g
<Snip>
__
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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