HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT best excuse yet (kind of long) (6 msgs / 429 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
True story, couldn't have made it up if I had tried.  A friend's son 
went to a chain store for the first time.  This young man had only 
had his parents coffee which is bought at the same roaster I used to 
buy from - very good and fresh coffee.
The boy, Mike, felt kind of cool going in the chain - a sign of 
growing up, I guess.  His friends have started hanging there, you can 
get on-line, all of that stuff.  The stuff that the marketing people, 
just doing their jobs, want you to do and feel.
The coffee tasted so different to him from the only coffee he had 
experienced, that he thought the machine burned it.  He knows nothing 
of beans and roasting.  He went to the counter and told the guy this 
and asked for a fresh cup (which we know would taste the same).  Here 
is the answer he got.
Paraphrased (and probably with some bias in it, though I will try not 
to do so) - "we make our coffee dark, which is from our roots in the 
northwest where dark is the preferred method, it isn't burned"  My 
friend said, yes it is, but that didn't matter, could he just swap 
out the coffee as their satisfaction guarantee states.  He was then 
told, and this is PRICELESS, "while getting use to dark coffee is a 
matter of time, to help we do have out our sweeteners and 
creams.  The sweeteners, such as cane sugar, are catalysts to bring 
out the hidden flavors in the coffee.  The cream takes down the 
natural acidity that some people don't understand is part of the 
coffee, but it also is a magnifier of the various flavors.  Why don't 
you try using them."
Now, holding up the line, he was over it and just asked for his money 
back, which he got.  Now, in my friend's child's defence he hadn't 
visited the chain stores, so he got what they offer and what has made 
them a success (strike that, damn good marketing and a willing 
consumer have made them famous).
The excuses given are priceless and scary.
I know people like cream and sugar in their coffee, that is their 
business and for some it must make the experience better, like 
putting condiments on a burger - which I wouldn't do to a good, home 
made burger.  It is NONE of my business how people take their 
food.  But the information this place was feeding my friend was just 
plain wrong to do.  If one is proud of their product, be so, but also 
honor the guarantee.
Sorry for the rant, but I hate it when people don't stand up for 
their product.  Be proud of it if you really feel it is the best.
Stephen

2) From: Brett Mason
Good point Stephen.
Seems they did stand up for their product (at least as they understand it)
And they honored their guarantee (money back)
They even went further to try to help the youngster gain more appreciation
for the way they like their coffee (service excellence)
And, unbeknownst to the child, they also offer their "Lightnote Blends"
which are less smokeyburnt, and more akin to other coffee places...
So we agree - stand up for the product, honor the guarantee, and offer
service excellence....  No wonder they're getting rich.
And I don't personally like the place...
Brett
On 8/3/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Stephen Carey
Brett,
Excellent points by you, also.  The one thing that I still find 
amusing is the shady answer about the cream and sugar.  It can be 
said that, "this is how our coffee is made, but we always have a 
second type brewing (which they do), would you like to try that?"  I 
just think the answer was off base.
Though, I actually don't mind the chain.  I don't drink their coffee, 
but I have met friends there and gotten water, the people are nice, 
it is a business model that works and I know how hard that is to do.
But, I have never heard that sugar was a catalyst and the cream 
helped bring out other flavors - I am also NOT a chemist.
I was very glad that they gave this young man his money back, he will 
respect them all the more, though he may not buy their coffee.
I also lived in the Northwest for a while, have a major client out 
there and am out there a few times each year - in Seattle.  The 
coffee, in some of the private coffee shops is indeed slightly darker 
than in some here, but it does not have a burned flavor, and it is 
brewed on premises, something a chain just couldn't do and maintain a 
consistency, as has been pointed out to me.
What this young man did learn is that there is a reason that his 
father buys his coffee freshly roasted; and, he realized he is 
somewhat spoiled in the world of coffee, he may or may not brew his 
own (his dad asked if he could bring him here for a roast next week), 
but he will be a smarter consumer.  Actually, he was pretty smart, he 
didn't like what he got, he did not make a fuss about it, just asked 
them to follow their promise, which they did.
I think both the chain and the kid were winners.
At 09:57 AM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Brett Mason
One other tip about the chain....  If you ask for a presspot, they will make
one for you...  I have done this - ask for a presspot, and specify one of
their specialty coffees, the expensive ones - and particularly the lighter
roasted ones...  You can get a fairly nice cup o Joe there, if you work
it......
You've gotten this coffee thing down well Stephen!
B
On 8/3/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

5) From: Stephen Carey
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Thank you for the compliment.
It never occurred to ask for a presspot and in my business, when we 
are up after 3 hours of sleep and the venue has a Starbuck's that 
opens at 6:00, we need something, certainly something better than the 
$60/half gallon swill called coffee by the venue.  On one show I was 
producing the convention center's coffee was so bad that my associate 
producer went out bought a Mr. Coffee and went to a good coffee shop 
she knew about in Atlanta.  We knew the Mr. Coffee would disappear 
before the end of the show, so we didn't spend money on brewing, but 
the real coffee made a difference - a big one.
Thanks for the tip.  Trust me, many of us thank you - my entire team 
thanks you.
At 12:43 PM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Thank you for the compliment.  
It never occurred to ask for a presspot and in my business, when we are
up after 3 hours of sleep and the venue has a Starbuck's that opens at
6:00, we need something, certainly something better than the $60/half
gallon swill called coffee by the venue.  On one show I was
producing the convention center's coffee was so bad that my associate
producer went out bought a Mr. Coffee and went to a good coffee shop she
knew about in Atlanta.  We knew the Mr. Coffee would disappear
before the end of the show, so we didn't spend money on brewing, but the
real coffee made a difference - a big one.
Thanks for the tip.  Trust me, many of us thank you - my entire team
thanks you.
At 12:43 PM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
One other tip about the
chain....  If you ask for a presspot, they will make one for
you...  I have done this - ask for a presspot, and specify one of
their specialty coffees, the expensive ones - and particularly the
lighter roasted ones...  You can get a fairly nice cup o Joe there,
if you work it...... 
You've gotten this coffee thing down well Stephen!
B
On 8/3/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote:
Brett,
Excellent points by you, also.  The one thing that I still find
amusing is the shady answer about the cream and sugar.  It can be
said that, "this is how our coffee is made, but we always have a
second type brewing (which they do), would you like to try
that?"  I just think the answer was off base.
Though, I actually don't mind the chain.  I don't drink their
coffee, but I have met friends there and gotten water, the people are
nice, it is a business model that works and I know how hard that is to
do.  
But, I have never heard that sugar was a catalyst and the cream
helped bring out other flavors - I am also NOT a chemist.
I was very glad that they gave this young man his money back, he will
respect them all the more, though he may not buy their coffee. 
I also lived in the Northwest for a while, have a major client out
there and am out there a few times each year - in Seattle.  The
coffee, in some of the private coffee shops is indeed slightly darker
than in some here, but it does not have a burned flavor, and it is brewed
on premises, something a chain just couldn't do and maintain a
consistency, as has been pointed out to me. 
What this young man did learn is that there is a reason that his
father buys his coffee freshly roasted; and, he realized he is somewhat
spoiled in the world of coffee, he may or may not brew his own (his dad
asked if he could bring him here for a roast next week), but he will be a
smarter consumer.  Actually, he was pretty smart, he didn't like
what he got, he did not make a fuss about it, just asked them to follow
their promise, which they did.
I think both the chain and the kid were winners.
At 09:57 AM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
Good point Stephen.
 
Seems they did stand up for their product (at least as they
understand it)
 
And they honored their guarantee (money back)
 
They even went further to try to help the youngster gain more
appreciation for the way they like their coffee (service excellence)
 
And, unbeknownst to the child, they also offer their "Lightnote
Blends" which are less smokeyburnt, and more akin to other coffee
places...
 
So we agree - stand up for the product, honor the guarantee, and
offer service excellence....  No wonder they're getting rich.
 
And I don't personally like the place...
Brett
 
On 8/3/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
True story, couldn't have made it up if I had tried.  A friend's
son 
went to a chain store for the first time.  This young man had
only 
had his parents coffee which is bought at the same roaster I used to 
buy from - very good and fresh coffee.
The boy, Mike, felt kind of cool going in the chain - a sign of 
growing up, I guess.  His friends have started hanging there,
you can 
get on-line, all of that stuff.  The stuff that the marketing
people, 
just doing their jobs, want you to do and feel.
The coffee tasted so different to him from the only coffee he had 
experienced, that he thought the machine burned it.  He knows
nothing 
of beans and roasting.  He went to the counter and told the guy
this 
and asked for a fresh cup (which we know would taste the same). 
Here 
is the answer he got. 
Paraphrased (and probably with some bias in it, though I will try not 
to do so) - "we make our coffee dark, which is from our roots in
the 
northwest where dark is the preferred method, it isn't
burned"  My 
friend said, yes it is, but that didn't matter, could he just swap 
out the coffee as their satisfaction guarantee states.  He was
then 
told, and this is PRICELESS, "while getting use to dark coffee
is a 
matter of time, to help we do have out our sweeteners and 
creams.  The sweeteners, such as cane sugar, are catalysts to
bring 
out the hidden flavors in the coffee.  The cream takes down the 
natural acidity that some people don't understand is part of the 
coffee, but it also is a magnifier of the various flavors.  Why
don't 
you try using them." 
Now, holding up the line, he was over it and just asked for his money 
back, which he got.  Now, in my friend's child's defence he
hadn't 
visited the chain stores, so he got what they offer and what has made 
them a success (strike that, damn good marketing and a willing 
consumer have made them famous).
The excuses given are priceless and scary.
I know people like cream and sugar in their coffee, that is their 
business and for some it must make the experience better, like 
putting condiments on a burger - which I wouldn't do to a good, home 
made burger.  It is NONE of my business how people take their 
food.  But the information this place was feeding my friend was
just 
plain wrong to do.  If one is proud of their product, be so, but
also 
honor the guarantee.
Sorry for the rant, but I hate it when people don't stand up for 
their product.  Be proud of it if you really feel it is the
best. 
Stephen 
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-- 
Cheers,
Brett
http://homeroast.freeservers.com
-- 
Cheers,
Brett
http://homeroast.freeservers.com
--=====================_16662625==.ALT--

6) From: Sandy Andina
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On Aug 3, 2007, at 8:57 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Which, sadly, they brew stronger than their dark roasts to give  
customers a consistent "Starbuck's experience."
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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On Aug 3, 2007, at =
8:57 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
And, = unbeknownst to the child, they also offer their "Lightnote Blends" which = are less smokeyburnt, and more akin to other coffee = places... 
Which, sadly, they brew stronger = than their dark roasts to give customers a consistent "Starbuck's = experience." Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-2--439437045--


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