HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The Horse rides through the Misty Valley (very LONG post) (11 msgs / 662 lines)
1) From: JanoMac
In our discussion of taking the North Africans to lighter roasts, I recentl=
y
had the opportunity for a once in a lifetime trial. (OK...maybe a possible
"several times in a lifetime" event)
I had the distinction of doing some consulting work that required I make a
1+ hour drive to Indianapolis 2 days in a row.  My habit in such events is
to make a small pot of coffee and take with me in a thermos. I drink my own
coffee during the introductory
"getting-to-know-each-other-while-we-eat-donuts" time before the meetings
start and I sip on my coffee throughout the day. I take my thermos with me
to lunch and wave off attempts by the wait staff to fill my cup with what I
know will be (as Ray calls it) "dreck."
Another near daily habit is to make a "Cappu-Latte" (not enough milk to
qualify as a latte and probably too much milk and not enough foam to qualif=
y
as a cappuccino) for the drive to work.
I use what has been referred to in this list as a "steam-toy" espresso make=
r
and get a reasonable double-shot of something more like espresso than the
moka pots can make, but not nearly as crema-laden as a "real" espresso. I
would say my shots are better than what I have had at *$, but you'd know
that I wouldn't be saying much. 
I have been hoarding my remaining Ethiopia Harar Horse Lot #30. I now have =
a
little less than a pound of the legendary beans and it will be gone soon. {
sigh! }
I have a few pounds left of the equally famous Ethiopia Yirgecheffe Indido
Misty Valley. I bought a 10-pounder a soon as I had sampled the first lot.
That was probably one of my smarter coffee moves.
Last week, I decided to re-open the Harar Horse Lot #30 bag to make sure it
hadn't gone over the edge by virtue of long-term storage. I roasted up
around 6-8 oz. To around a City+/FC level. I say "about," because as some o=
f
you know, this coffee does not roast evenly. As some of the beans are still
entering 1st crack, others have been whirling around in the heat of my
popper on the verge of 2nd crack. I stopped a little earlier than I
generally do with this Harar, so I had a few more of the peanut-colored
lighter beans -- just after the hint of blueberry disappeared from the smok=
e
coming off the top.
I roasted the IMV; one sample roasted to a light C/C+ and a second batch
roasted to FC at just the verge of 2nd crack.
Both rested 4 days before I opened the containers (small Mason jars if
anyone cares ). I didn't smell the berries in the Horse #30, but it
was sure there in the IMV. After 4 days, the IMV had a few beans with spots
of shiny oil. The Horse #30 was still variegated and dry in appearance.
The 4-day rest produced a couple of nice drip-brewed cups of each and a nic=
e
shot of espresso from the IMV.
On the 5th day, and for the first time ever, I blended these two coffees
before grinding. 50% Horse #30 & 50% IMV  -- with a little Sumatra Classic
Mendehling (FC+) tossed in for lower-end body...and because I still had a
tiny bit sitting there at more than 6-days rest. The final blend was
probably more like 47.5: 47.5: 5, but who cares about decimals here?
I ground a step finer than I usually do for drip on an inexpensive burr
grinder. I saved the talcum-powder fines and put them into the espresso
basket. I made a pot of drip and pulled  a double pseudo-espresso with the
same coffee. I steamed/slightly foamed my milk, made the Cappu-Latte in my
favorite travel mug, slipped in just a "touch" of sugar, filled & sealed th=
e
thermos, and set off to Indianapolis.
A few miles down the road, I sipped from the mug and I nearly had to pull
over due to my reaction to the coffee.
Blueberry hit me as if it were a syrup had been added to the coffee to make
blueberry crème! There was the strong flavor of milk chocolate and, as I
just kind of sat there amazed, other berry and fruit flavors exposed
themselves in my mouth. In there was a population of sweet and exotic spice=
s
I had never tasted in my coffee before.  My tongue actually tingled!
I said "Oh, Wow!" out loud to no one there and looked around to see if I
could share this with anyone. In spite of typical traffic on US 65, I was
essentially alone on the highway. Like I said, I almost pulled over and
stopped the car. No kidding.
I gathered myself back together and took another careful sip.
Wham...the experience happened again. I just started at the mug.
Unbelievable!
I purposed to make the mug last the entire hour trip, but I failed. In 30
minutes or so, the mug was emptied.
I got to Indy in a little over an hour and the very pleasant, tingly
aftertaste was still on my tongue as I was walking into the meeting area.
When the aftertaste subsided, I opened the thermos for the drip-brew. I was
not disappointed. It was less intense, of course, than the espresso-style
beverage I had had during the drive, but all the tingly spiciness and the
swirl of fruits and berries was still there. Several times throughout the
day, I  had a very difficult time concentrating on the tasks I had been
given to do. It was easy to ignore the talk of others as I swished coffee i=
n
my mouth, then smiled and nodded -- seemingly in agreement with or
understanding of what the leader was saying, but actually in affirmation of
the flavors and a silent "Oh, yes!" of encouragement to my taste buds!
Every great now and then, you get it all together and put it together
correctly:
  The best green beans from a particular origin
  The proper and appropriate roast for a particular bean
  The "best" time of the rest
  The right blending of coffees
  The correct grind level
  The proper extraction at the right temperature
...and time to enjoy it all.
I tried a repeat performance the next day. The coffee was still wonderful,
but those intense flavors and the sequential explosions of fruits and spice=
s
were more muted. The day's drip brew from the thermos was just as good as
the day before -- and you'd better believe I enjoyed small amounts of it al=
l
through the morning and afternoon!
Riding that Harar Horse through the Indido Misty Valley was quite an
experience. I am going to roast up a little more this afternoon and see if
we can spur on some more great coffee!
Those of you, particularly newbies, who have not tried the Harars,
Yirgecheffes, and other North African & Arabian coffees for their unique
spiciness, zing, and occasional fruitiness, you really need to pick up some
of the current offerings and try them at a lighter (City or City+) or
mélange roast. (Mélange = a "mix" of lighter-roast and darker-roast of the
same variety bean)
Not everyone will like that "wildness" in the cup, but you need to
experience it nonetheless. I also love the cultured & refined flavor of a
traditional Costa Rican and the extra-smooth silkiness of the Brazilian
bourbon varieties, but these North Africans simply widedned my coffee
experience by many miles!
Kirk

2) From: Lisa Carton
nice..................
that's what it's all about........ride on cowpoke!=
  Love the write-up...thanks~~~~
;D
 
~~~~> Come see my Coffee Blog a=
t http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com   
----- Original Message ----=
From: JanoMac 
To: homeroast=
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2007 2:59:41 PM
Subject: +The Horse rides thro=
ugh the Misty Valley (very LONG post)
In our discussion of taking t=
he North Africans to lighter roasts, I recently
had the opportunity for a=
 once in a lifetime trial. (OK...maybe a possible
"several times in a lif=
etime" event)
I had the distinction of doing some consulting work that=
 required I make a
1+ hour drive to Indianapolis 2 days in a row.  My hab=
it in such events is
to make a small pot of coffee and take with me in a =
thermos. I drink my own
coffee during the introductory
"getting-to-know=
-each-other-while-we-eat-donuts" time before the meetings
start and I sip=
 on my coffee throughout the day. I take my thermos with me
to lunch and =
wave off attempts by the wait staff to fill my cup with what I
know will =
be (as Ray calls it) "dreck."
Another near daily habit is to make a "C=
appu-Latte" (not enough milk to
qualify as a latte and probably too much =
milk and not enough foam to qualify
as a cappuccino) for the drive to wor=
k.
I use what has been referred to in this list as a "steam-toy" espre=
sso maker
and get a reasonable double-shot of something more like espress=
o than the
moka pots can make, but not nearly as crema-laden as a "real" =
espresso. I
would say my shots are better than what I have had at *$, but=
 you'd know
that I wouldn't be saying much. 
I have been hoard=
ing my remaining Ethiopia Harar Horse Lot #30. I now have a
little less t=
han a pound of the legendary beans and it will be gone soon. {
sigh! }
=
I have a few pounds left of the equally famous Ethiopia Yirgecheffe Indi=
do
Misty Valley. I bought a 10-pounder a soon as I had sampled the first =
lot.
That was probably one of my smarter coffee moves.
Last week, I =
decided to re-open the Harar Horse Lot #30 bag to make sure it
hadn't gon=
e over the edge by virtue of long-term storage. I roasted up
around 6-8 o=
z. To around a City+/FC level. I say "about," because as some of
you know=
, this coffee does not roast evenly. As some of the beans are still
enter=
ing 1st crack, others have been whirling around in the heat of my
popper =
on the verge of 2nd crack. I stopped a little earlier than I
generally do=
 with this Harar, so I had a few more of the peanut-colored
lighter beans=
 -- just after the hint of blueberry disappeared from the smoke
coming of=
f the top.
I roasted the IMV; one sample roasted to a light C/C+ and a=
 second batch
roasted to FC at just the verge of 2nd crack.
Both res=
ted 4 days before I opened the containers (small Mason jars if
anyone car=
es ). I didn't smell the berries in the Horse #30, but it
was sure =
there in the IMV. After 4 days, the IMV had a few beans with spots
of shi=
ny oil. The Horse #30 was still variegated and dry in appearance.
The =
4-day rest produced a couple of nice drip-brewed cups of each and a nice
=
shot of espresso from the IMV.
On the 5th day, and for the first time =
ever, I blended these two coffees
before grinding. 50% Horse #30 & 50% IM=
V  -- with a little Sumatra Classic
Mendehling (FC+) tossed in for lower-=
end body...and because I still had a
tiny bit sitting there at more than =
6-days rest. The final blend was
probably more like 47.5: 47.5: 5, but wh=
o cares about decimals here?
I ground a step finer than I usually do f=
or drip on an inexpensive burr
grinder. I saved the talcum-powder fines a=
nd put them into the espresso
basket. I made a pot of drip and pulled  a =
double pseudo-espresso with the
same coffee. I steamed/slightly foamed my=
 milk, made the Cappu-Latte in my
favorite travel mug, slipped in just a =
"touch" of sugar, filled & sealed the
thermos, and set off to Indianapoli=
s.
A few miles down the road, I sipped from the mug and I nearly had t=
o pull
over due to my reaction to the coffee.
Blueberry hit me as if=
 it were a syrup had been added to the coffee to make
blueberry crème! =
There was the strong flavor of milk chocolate and, as I
just kind of sat =
there amazed, other berry and fruit flavors exposed
themselves in my mout=
h. In there was a population of sweet and exotic spices
I had never taste=
d in my coffee before.  My tongue actually tingled!
I said "Oh, Wow!" =
out loud to no one there and looked around to see if I
could share this w=
ith anyone. In spite of typical traffic on US 65, I was
essentially alone=
 on the highway. Like I said, I almost pulled over and
stopped the car. N=
o kidding.
I gathered myself back together and took another careful si=
p.
Wham...the experience happened again. I just started at the mug.
Unb=
elievable!
I purposed to make the mug last the entire hour trip, but I=
 failed. In 30
minutes or so, the mug was emptied.
I got to Indy in =
a little over an hour and the very pleasant, tingly
aftertaste was still =
on my tongue as I was walking into the meeting area.
When the aftertas=
te subsided, I opened the thermos for the drip-brew. I was
not disappoint=
ed. It was less intense, of course, than the espresso-style
beverage I ha=
d had during the drive, but all the tingly spiciness and the
swirl of fru=
its and berries was still there. Several times throughout the
day, I  had=
 a very difficult time concentrating on the tasks I had been
given to do.=
 It was easy to ignore the talk of others as I swished coffee in
my mouth=
, then smiled and nodded -- seemingly in agreement with or
understanding =
of what the leader was saying, but actually in affirmation of
the flavors=
 and a silent "Oh, yes!" of encouragement to my taste buds!
Every grea=
t now and then, you get it all together and put it together
correctly:
=
  The best green beans from a particular origin
  The proper and appropri=
ate roast for a particular bean
  The "best" time of the rest
  The rig=
ht blending of coffees
  The correct grind level
  The proper extractio=
n at the right temperature
...and time to enjoy it all.
I tried a=
 repeat performance the next day. The coffee was still wonderful,
but tho=
se intense flavors and the sequential explosions of fruits and spices
wer=
e more muted. The day's drip brew from the thermos was just as good as
th=
e day before -- and you'd better believe I enjoyed small amounts of it all=
through the morning and afternoon!
Riding that Harar Horse through =
the Indido Misty Valley was quite an
experience. I am going to roast up a=
 little more this afternoon and see if
we can spur on some more great cof=
fee!
Those of you, particularly newbies, who have not tried the Harars=
,
Yirgecheffes, and other North African & Arabian coffees for their uniqu=
e
spiciness, zing, and occasional fruitiness, you really need to pick up =
some
of the current offerings and try them at a lighter (City or City+) o=
r
mélange roast. (Mélange = a "mix" of lighter-roast and darker-roa=
st of the
same variety bean)
Not everyone will like that "wildness" =
in the cup, but you need to
experience it nonetheless. I also love the cu=
ltured & refined flavor of a
traditional Costa Rican and the extra-smooth=
 silkiness of the Brazilian
bourbon varieties, but these North Africans s=
imply widedned my coffee
experience by many miles!
Kirk=
homeroast mailing listhttp://=lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
To change your personal =
list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetm=arias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings=
=
Building a website is a piece of cake. Yahoo! Small Business gives you all =
the tools to get online.http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/webhosting

3) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_25278843==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
You have experienced and shared one of those all 
too rare events or moments in time.  Your writing 
is eloquent, your style took me to where I could smell the brews.
Thank you for taking the time to share this with us.
At 02:59 PM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
 recently
<Snip>
 qualify
<Snip>
 maker
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
 of
<Snip>
 smoke
<Snip>
 nice
<Snip>
 the
<Snip>
 spices
<Snip>
 in
<Snip>
 spices
<Snip>
 all
<Snip>
 of the
<Snip>
--=====================_25278843==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
You have experienced and shared one of those all too rare
events or moments in time.  Your writing is eloquent, your style
took me to where I could smell the brews.
Thank you for taking the time to share this with us.
At 02:59 PM 8/3/2007, you wrote:
In our discussion of taking t=
he
North Africans to lighter roasts, I recently
had the opportunity for a once in a lifetime trial. (OK...maybe a
possible
"several times in a lifetime" event)
I had the distinction of doing some consulting work that required I make
a
1+ hour drive to Indianapolis 2 days in a row.  My habit in such
events is
to make a small pot of coffee and take with me in a thermos. I drink my
own
coffee during the introductory
"getting-to-know-each-other-while-we-eat-donuts" time before
the meetings
start and I sip on my coffee throughout the day. I take my thermos with
me
to lunch and wave off attempts by the wait staff to fill my cup with what
I
know will be (as Ray calls it) "dreck."
Another near daily habit is to make a "Cappu-Latte" (not enough
milk to
qualify as a latte and probably too much milk and not enough foam to
qualify
as a cappuccino) for the drive to work.
I use what has been referred to in this list as a "steam-toy"
espresso maker
and get a reasonable double-shot of something more like espresso than
the
moka pots can make, but not nearly as crema-laden as a "real"
espresso. I
would say my shots are better than what I have had at *$, but you'd
know
that I wouldn't be saying much. <grin>
I have been hoarding my remaining Ethiopia Harar Horse Lot #30. I now
have a
little less than a pound of the legendary beans and it will be gone soon.
{
sigh! }
I have a few pounds left of the equally famous Ethiopia Yirgecheffe
Indido
Misty Valley. I bought a 10-pounder a soon as I had sampled the first
lot.
That was probably one of my smarter coffee moves.
Last week, I decided to re-open the Harar Horse Lot #30 bag to make sure
it
hadn't gone over the edge by virtue of long-term storage. I roasted
up
around 6-8 oz. To around a City+/FC level. I say "about,"
because as some of
you know, this coffee does not roast evenly. As some of the beans are
still
entering 1st crack, others have been whirling around in the heat of
my
popper on the verge of 2nd crack. I stopped a little earlier than I
generally do with this Harar, so I had a few more of the
peanut-colored
lighter beans -- just after the hint of blueberry disappeared from the
smoke
coming off the top.
I roasted the IMV; one sample roasted to a light C/C+ and a second
batch
roasted to FC at just the verge of 2nd crack.
Both rested 4 days before I opened the containers (small Mason jars
if
anyone cares <grin>). I didn't smell the berries in the Horse #30,
but it
was sure there in the IMV. After 4 days, the IMV had a few beans with
spots
of shiny oil. The Horse #30 was still variegated and dry in
appearance.
The 4-day rest produced a couple of nice drip-brewed cups of each and a
nice
shot of espresso from the IMV.
On the 5th day, and for the first time ever, I blended these two
coffees
before grinding. 50% Horse #30 & 50% IMV  -- with a little
Sumatra Classic
Mendehling (FC+) tossed in for lower-end body...and because I still had
a
tiny bit sitting there at more than 6-days rest. The final blend was
probably more like 47.5: 47.5: 5, but who cares about decimals
here?
I ground a step finer than I usually do for drip on an inexpensive
burr
grinder. I saved the talcum-powder fines and put them into the
espresso
basket. I made a pot of drip and pulled  a double pseudo-espresso
with the
same coffee. I steamed/slightly foamed my milk, made the Cappu-Latte in
my
favorite travel mug, slipped in just a "touch" of sugar, filled
& sealed the
thermos, and set off to Indianapolis.
A few miles down the road, I sipped from the mug and I nearly had to
pull
over due to my reaction to the coffee.
Blueberry hit me as if it were a syrup had been added to the coffee to
make
blueberry crème! There was the strong flavor of milk chocolate and, as
I
just kind of sat there amazed, other berry and fruit flavors exposed
themselves in my mouth. In there was a population of sweet and exotic
spices
I had never tasted in my coffee before.  My tongue actually
tingled!
I said "Oh, Wow!" out loud to no one there and looked around to
see if I
could share this with anyone. In spite of typical traffic on US 65, I
was
essentially alone on the highway. Like I said, I almost pulled over
and
stopped the car. No kidding.
I gathered myself back together and took another careful sip.
Wham...the experience happened again. I just started at the mug.
Unbelievable!
I purposed to make the mug last the entire hour trip, but I failed. In
30
minutes or so, the mug was emptied.
I got to Indy in a little over an hour and the very pleasant, tingly
aftertaste was still on my tongue as I was walking into the meeting
area.
When the aftertaste subsided, I opened the thermos for the drip-brew. I
was
not disappointed. It was less intense, of course, than the
espresso-style
beverage I had had during the drive, but all the tingly spiciness and
the
swirl of fruits and berries was still there. Several times throughout
the
day, I  had a very difficult time concentrating on the tasks I had
been
given to do. It was easy to ignore the talk of others as I swished coffee
in
my mouth, then smiled and nodded -- seemingly in agreement with or
understanding of what the leader was saying, but actually in affirmation
of
the flavors and a silent "Oh, yes!" of encouragement to my
taste buds!
Every great now and then, you get it all together and put it
together
correctly:
  The best green beans from a particular origin
  The proper and appropriate roast for a particular bean
  The "best" time of the rest
  The right blending of coffees
  The correct grind level
  The proper extraction at the right temperature
...and time to enjoy it all.
I tried a repeat performance the next day. The coffee was still
wonderful,
but those intense flavors and the sequential explosions of fruits and
spices
were more muted. The day's drip brew from the thermos was just as good
as
the day before -- and you'd better believe I enjoyed small amounts of it
all
through the morning and afternoon!
Riding that Harar Horse through the Indido Misty Valley was quite an
experience. I am going to roast up a little more this afternoon and see
if
we can spur on some more great coffee!
Those of you, particularly newbies, who have not tried the Harars,
Yirgecheffes, and other North African & Arabian coffees for their
unique
spiciness, zing, and occasional fruitiness, you really need to pick up
some
of the current offerings and try them at a lighter (City or City+)
or
mélange roast. (Mélange = a "mix" of lighter-roast and
darker-roast of the
same variety bean)
Not everyone will like that "wildness" in the cup, but you need
to
experience it nonetheless. I also love the cultured & refined flavor
of a
traditional Costa Rican and the extra-smooth silkiness of the
Brazilian
bourbon varieties, but these North Africans simply widedned my
coffee
experience by many miles!
Kirk
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_25278843==.ALT--

4) From: Bob
WOW!
I don't have the Harar Lot 30 but I do have the 14659 Lot. I'm gonna 
give your suggestion a try. Looking forward to it.
Thanks for the post!
Bob

5) From: Eddie Dove
Kirk,
That was a thoroughly enjoyable read!  Thank you so much for sharing
and I do remember the last experience I had like that, which was last
October and just so happened to be with the Idido Misty Valley.
Just yesterday a gentleman at the office tried the Idido Misty Valley
while we sat and had a conversation.  After his first sip, this
incredulous look overcame his face as he exclaimed, "Blueberry Eggo
waffles with blueberry syrup ... I taste all of it!"  We continued to
talk and the cup cooled a bit.  He sipped again, "It's gone but now
theres other fruit, PEACH!  ITS ALL PEACH!"
Thanks again for the enjoyable read.
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/

6) From: Les
Kirk,
Thanks for the great write-up.  This is what I long to see more of on the
list.  I will be pulling shots of 4 day rested Idido Misty Valley tomorrow.
I also have 3 day roasted Green Stripe Harar Horse in the roasted stash, I
think I may go for a horse ride through the Misty Valley tomorrow after that
fantastic write-up.  Dr. Crema says you really ought to get yourself a good
espresso machine and grinder so you can have that experience more often.
Les
On 8/3/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Brian Kamnetz
Kirk,
Thanks for your post. Almost like poetry
On 8/3/07, JanoMac  wrote:
<Snip>
through the Indido Misty Valley
<Snip>
I am going to roast up
<Snip>
a little more this afternoon
<Snip>
and see if we can spur on
<Snip>
some more great coffee!
<Snip>
that "wildness" in the cup,
<Snip>
but you need to experience it
   nonetheless. Nonetheless.
  Experience it nonetheless.

8) From: DJ Garcia
If I could only get Ethiopians and Panamanians I'd be a happy camper.
DJ

9) From: Les
Kirk,
I rode the Harar Horse Green Stripe through the Misty Valley this morning.
I am just finishing a Cappo of it right now.  The single shot was smooth and
silky with blueberry layered in currant and a nice peach-aproicot finish.
The cappo was a little less intense, and there was a lot of almond flavors.
The blueberry followed by a nice chocolate aftertaste is now hitting the
taste buds.  Kirk thanks for sharing your experience.  I don't think I would
have tried this blend.  It is so smooth and rich!  I really like it as a
straight shot!
Les
On 8/3/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: JanoMac
Bob, the 14659 is the one Sweet Maria's has in stock right now, right? If
so, I have some on the way (just made an order and I put so much on the
list, I forget what I held back on!). I doubt it will be the "blueberry
bomb" as others have described Lot 30, but as good as all the Harar lots
from SM have been, I fully expect 14659 will be wonderful! Enjoy!
Kirk
<Snip>

11) From: JanoMac
Thanks for your reply, Eddie.
I would have loved to have been there to see your friend's face as the cup
changed! 
Some of this stuff is just incredible, isn't it?
...and some folks wonder why I get all excited over a "plain ol' cup of
coffee!"
Kirk


HomeRoast Digest