HomeRoast Digest


Topic: bean culling (7 msgs / 179 lines)
1) From: Kevin
I was just curious as to whether or not most homeroasters cull their greens
prior to roasting?  If so, what should one be culling from the greens prior
to roasting?  For example, Harvey (now an obsoleted term) just dropped off 2
lbs of Kenya Thika Gethumbwini Peaberry and I noticed there are some beans
in the bag that have the center of the seed hollowed out, look like wedges
(a slice of a bean) and fragments of a peaberry.  Should these examples on
non-fully formed or 'broken' beans be pulled out prior to roasting?  Will
they affect the cup?
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

2) From: Rich M
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Kevin-
The only thing I take out are things that are not beans such as the  
occasional pebble or clump of dirt. I always figured that if a bean  
gets broken or malformed in some way, it won't affect the taste. The  
exception to my "all beans are created equal" attitude was discussed  
on this list a little while ago. Any beans that are black can ruin a  
cup and should be taken out prior to roasting. I've only found one or  
two of those, but they're out there!
Rich M
On Aug 4, 2007, at 2:41 PM, Kevin wrote:
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Kevin-The only thing I take =
out are things that are not beans such as the occasional pebble or clump =
of dirt. I always figured that if a bean gets broken or malformed in =
some way, it won't affect the taste. The exception to my "all beans are =
created equal" attitude was discussed on this list a little while ago. =
Any beans that are black can ruin a cup and should be taken out prior to =
roasting. I've only found one or two of those, but they're out =
there!
Rich = M On Aug 4, 2007, at 2:41 PM, Kevin wrote:
I was just = curious as to whether or not most homeroasters cull their greens prior = to roasting?  If so, what should one be culling from the greens prior = to roasting?  For example, Harvey (now an obsoleted term) just dropped = off 2 lbs of Kenya Thika Gethumbwini Peaberry and I noticed there are = some beans in the bag that have the center of the seed hollowed out, = look like wedges (a slice of a bean) and fragments of a peaberry.  = Should these examples on non-fully formed or 'broken' beans be pulled = out prior to roasting?  Will they affect the cup?
-- My home coffee roasting blog: http://homecoffeeroastbl=og.blogspot.com/ Kevin = --Apple-Mail-3--354805055--

3) From: raymanowen
Hi, Kevin-
Unless you actually receive a 16 penny nail or a green bowling ball drilled
for a south paw, don't cull anything out of Sweet Maria's beans.
This culling thing could easily get out of hand- Just because something is
"different," don't cull it out. You'll get some fabulous flavor variety if
you control the roast so that the minor pieces don't turn to *$ fodder.
Do Oatmeal-raisin cookies get culled if they're the rong diameter or a
little short on raisin count? If I bake them, they're called "Oatmeal
cookies with Raisins added- or not!"
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Ask your Cupper if it's right for you...

4) From: Scott Marquardt
Play. Try. The word "should" is freighted with moral teleology.   :-P
I once culled all the light beans from a largish Harrar roast, and brewed
'em. It was a fascinating beverage.
If you want something uniform, cull any exceptional beans.
IMO it's always worth swirling a batch in a pan before roasting, just in
case there's anything genuinely evil there worth spotting.
SM's beans are pretty much pure specialty coffee -- few beans to cull. Other
sources can be excellent too, of course, and sometimes getting excellent
beans can mean descending into sub-specialty grades that require some
serious culling. It's a price you can pay in time invested, sometimes, if
you really, really, really want a particular bean.
- S
On 8/4/07, Kevin  wrote:
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5) From: Homeroaster
There are a few beans I pull out, pre and post roast.  If I see a really 
black bean, I take it out.  After the roast, if I see a bean that didn't 
roast like the others (usually a sign of an unripe bean that got through the 
milling process), I cull it out.  If you taste the bean, the flavor you get 
would not add character to the brew.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

6) From: Rick Copple
Kevin wrote:
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I don't do a lot of culling myself. If I spot a bad bean, and it has to 
really look bad, I'll reach in and pull it. But, short of something 
really odd looking, or like the rock I found rolling around in my wok 
roast of  Mysore Nuggets, I usually will leave it in, even the more 
seemingly unroasted looking beans.
BTW, had my first cup of Mysore today, and it was good. Really enjoyable.
Also have some Guat Anigua on the shelf, waiting its turn in the pot. 
Probably tomorrow. Can't wait. :)
-- 
Rick Copple

7) From: Justin Marquez
Kevin,
Those hollowed out looking ones are called "elephant ears". They are
considered a slight defect (as is a peaberry) because they roast faster. I
usually leave them in.  The wedges I leave in, too.  Sometimes I cull out
the small really malformed beans.  I also cull out beans that are badly
bug-chewed or are black colored. I also cull out anything that doesn't look
like a coffee bean.
Beans from SM usually don't have many defects, but it is always a good idea
to rake through what you are about to roast.  After roasting, I will cull
out any beans that appear to have not roasted properly. Sometimes there will
be a couple that just wouldn't get as "done" as the rest.  (I found a really
black coffee bean in a Panama 1800+ Meter batch this week. Now that is
unusual.)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 8/4/07, Kevin  wrote:
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