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Topic: blend with the same bean (7 msgs / 208 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Okay, before you laugh, remember, I am only on my 16th roast - which, 
actually, isn't too bad since I am the only one who drinks coffee in 
this house.
We are leaving on a very early flight tomorrow to visit my 
mother.  She has always loved Costa Rican coffees when she has gone 
with us to Costa Rica.  It is always freshly roasted and a wonderful 
experience to share with someone else.
So, I am taking her almost a pound of Costa Rica - Vino de Arabia.  I 
am extremely close to having it dialed in.  It will take me three 
roasts to have enough for a long weekend with a number of coffee 
drinkers.  Some will hate it for they prefer coffee that has been on 
the stove for four or five hours, so if they do hate it that leaves 
more for the rest of us.
That got me thinking about blends.  If there was a bean that you 
liked at, say, Full City, but also really enjoyed it at Full City + 
and you mixed them, post roast, of course, would that be a true 
"blend?"  Or just a mistake?
Just wondering and trying to look for a way out should I have 
slightly different profiles for the roasts tonight (they are so close 
that I can't believe it will make much of a difference, but I don't 
know for sure.  I do know that I am ordering more of this coffee so I 
can really get it to where I want it.  I just need more coffee 
drinkers so I can roast more coffee and more often.)
Thank you for answering this rather odd question.
Stephen

2) From: Barry Luterman
Not an odd question at all. It is not a blend.  It is a  Mélange which can 
result in quite a good a distinctive brew sometimes better than either 
component.

3) From: Homeroaster
I do it all the time.  Once in a while, I'll blend some air roasted beans 
with drum roasted to get the unique flavors of both in the same cup.
Live a little.  Experiment!
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************
On 8/10/2007 7:54:34 PM, Stephen Carey (steve) wrote:
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4) From: Stephen Carey
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Thank you both.  There is so much to learn about all of this.  While 
I may end up with it by accident, it is good to know should I run 
across a bean that works with different profiles.  I have the feeling 
this bean, the Costa Rica - Vino de Arabia, will be fine.  The three 
roasts will be so very close, with the differences being 10 seconds 
on one roast and 5F during the middle cycle on the other roast.  The 
final one will be the combination of the two, as it looks now.  I 
think I have dialed it in.
This truly is about not just following what a book says, but also 
what our senses tell us and our tongues tell us.  As much as I knew 
this was an art when I started, the enormity of the art amazes me, 
from the bean selection, by Tom, in this case, to what orchards, to 
what we do with it.  I doubt many people know what goes into a cup of 
coffee, and they don't have to as long as they enjoy it.
Stephen 
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Thank you both.  There is so much to learn about all of this. 
While I may end up with it by accident, it is good to know should I run
across a bean that works with different profiles.  I have the
feeling this bean, the Costa Rica - Vino de Arabia, will be fine. 
The three roasts will be so very close, with the differences being 10
seconds on one roast and 5F during the middle cycle on the other
roast.  The final one will be the combination of the two, as it
looks now.  I think I have dialed it in.
This truly is about not just following what a book says, but also what
our senses tell us and our tongues tell us.  As much as I knew this
was an art when I started, the enormity of the art amazes me, from the
bean selection, by Tom, in this case, to what orchards, to what we do
with it.  I doubt many people know what goes into a cup of coffee,
and they don't have to as long as they enjoy it.
Stephen
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5) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
The aim with either a blend or a mélange is to wind up with an entity =
which is sui generis

6) From: Jeff Oien
Also called a roast blend for those more masculinely inclined.
Many beans turn more chocolaty when roasted darker and can make a more 
full spectrummed cup of the same origin.
JeffO, I can make up my own words if I want to
Barry Luterman wrote:
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7) From: Stephen Carey
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Well, it is done, a full pound.  I know that doesn't sound like a big 
deal, but with an IR2 and the wait suggested between roasts it can 
take some time.  After each roast cooled, I let them sit for another 
3 to 5 minutes to drop off any gasses, then put in air tight 
containers until all were roasted.
Two of the roasts had the same profile, one came in slightly 
different because I added an ounce to the roast.  I took a chance and 
let the middle cycle run 5F hotter.  It worked.
What was wild was when I took them out of the containers to put them 
in the gold, 1lb. valve bag I could smell chocolate.  The bean crunch 
from each roast was kind of not a real test.  They really tasted good 
and I ate about 10 beans from each roast (which is good, I still need 
to do laundry and pack, shower, and be at the airport by 6 a.m.)
I feel I really learned a lot by taking the time to work with one 
bean in one day.  I admit, I dial in a lot more by senses than what 
would be considered the smartest method, but that is just how I 
am.  I am sure I will do it by only changing one element at a time 
for each roast until I get the roast the bean really wants, but that 
will be next week.
Have a great weekend.
Stephen 
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Well, it is done, a full pound.  I know that doesn't
sound like a big deal, but with an IR2 and the wait suggested between
roasts it can take some time.  After each roast cooled, I let them
sit for another 3 to 5 minutes to drop off any gasses, then put in air
tight containers until all were roasted.
Two of the roasts had the same profile, one came in slightly different
because I added an ounce to the roast.  I took a chance and let the
middle cycle run 5F hotter.  It worked.
What was wild was when I took them out of the containers to put them in
the gold, 1lb. valve bag I could smell chocolate.  The bean crunch
from each roast was kind of not a real test.  They really tasted
good and I ate about 10 beans from each roast (which is good, I still
need to do laundry and pack, shower, and be at the airport by 6
a.m.)
I feel I really learned a lot by taking the time to work with one bean in
one day.  I admit, I dial in a lot more by senses than what would be
considered the smartest method, but that is just how I am.  I am
sure I will do it by only changing one element at a time for each roast
until I get the roast the bean really wants, but that will be next
week.
Have a great weekend.
Stephen
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