HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT- Hispanic was RE: +Panama Auction and Especial Gesha arrived (3 msgs / 144 lines)
1) From: DJ Garcia
Sandy, you're probably right - might mean more like "Spanish speaking" =
or
such ... it gets confusing :-)
DJ
Dazed and confused

2) From: Vicki Smith
The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Hisˇpanˇic  (h-spnk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Spain or Spanish-speaking Latin America.
2. Of or relating to a Spanish-speaking people or culture.
n.
1. A Spanish-speaking person.
2. A U.S. citizen or resident of Latin-American or Spanish descent.
[Latin Hispnicus, from Hispnia, Spain.]
Usage Note: Though often used interchangeably in American English, 
Hispanic and Latino are not identical terms, and in certain contexts the 
choice between them can be significant. Hispanic, from the Latin word 
for "Spain," has the broader reference, potentially encompassing all 
Spanish-speaking peoples in both hemispheres and emphasizing the common 
denominator of language among communities that sometimes have little 
else in common. Latino which in Spanish means "Latin" but which as an 
English word is probably a shortening of the Spanish word 
latinoamericano refers more exclusively to persons or communities of 
Latin American origin. Of the two, only Hispanic can be used in 
referring to Spain and its history and culture; a native of Spain 
residing in the United States is a Hispanic, not a Latino, and one 
cannot substitute Latino in the phrase the Hispanic influence on native 
Mexican cultures without garbling the meaning. In practice, however, 
this distinction is of little significance when referring to residents 
of the United States, most of whom are of Latin American origin and can 
theoretically be called by either word.ˇA more important distinction 
concerns the sociopolitical rift that has opened between Latino and 
Hispanic in American usage. For a certain segment of the 
Spanish-speaking population, Latino is a term of ethnic pride and 
Hispanic a label that borders on the offensive. According to this view, 
Hispanic lacks the authenticity and cultural resonance of Latino, with 
its Spanish sound and its ability to show the feminine form Latina when 
used of women. Furthermore, Hispanic the term used by the U.S. Census 
Bureau and other government agencies is said to bear the stamp of an 
Anglo establishment far removed from the concerns of the 
Spanish-speaking community. While these views are strongly held by some, 
they are by no means universal, and the division in usage seems as 
related to geography as it is to politics, with Latino widely preferred 
in California and Hispanic the more usual term in Florida and Texas. 
Even in these regions, however, usage is often mixed, and it is not 
uncommon to find both terms used by the same writer or speaker. See 
Usage Note at Chicano.

3) From: raymanowen
"Furthermore, Hispanic the term used by the U.S. Census Bureau and
other government agencies is said to bear the stamp of an Anglo
establishment far removed from the concerns of the Spanish-speaking
community."
A belief in government agencies presupposes a certain credulity-
belief in government agencies. -ro
On 8/12/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
on
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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