HomeRoast Digest


Topic: ruined panama mama cata gesha (14 msgs / 449 lines)
1) From: George
I have re-roasted a few batches in my drum roaster as well.  I actually h=
ave
one customer that prefers certain coffee's, some sumatras to be exact, to=
 be
ejected early, let set a few minutes and then put back into the machine a=
nd
finished roasted to about a FC+.    I haven't tried this method on bright
coffee's as of yet.
George
 
--

2) From: George
 No really a new concept.  There is one roasting shop on the Internet tha=
t
only double roasts it's coffee.  I can't seem to remember or find the web
address now.  I seems that this method is only used for the darker roasts=
,
usually from FC++ and above.
Here is a snippet from a Coffee Geek posting.    There are several differ=
ent
methods used in coffee roasting, from traditional drum roasters to modern
fluid bed units as well as different theories on roasting styles, from ve=
ry
fast ‘high yield’ roasting to very slow ‘Brasilian’ roasting and =
even a
‘twice-roasted’ technique is used by some.  
 
--

3) From: George
 No really a new concept.  There is one roasting shop on the Internet tha=
t
only double roasts it's coffee.  I can't seem to remember or find the web
address now.  I seems that this method is only used for the darker roasts=
,
usually from FC++ and above.
 
Here is a snippet from a Coffee Geek posting.    There are several differ=
ent
methods used in coffee roasting, from traditional drum roasters to modern
fluid bed units as well as different theories on roasting styles, from ve=
ry
fast ‘high yield’ roasting to very slow ‘Brasilian’ roasting and =
even a
‘twice-roasted’ technique is used by some.  
 
--

4) From: George
I have re-roasted a few batches in my drum roaster as well.  I actually h=
ave
one customer that prefers certain coffee's, some sumatras to be exact, to=
 be
ejected early, let set a few minutes and then put back into the machine a=
nd
finished roasted to about a FC+.    I haven't tried this method on bright
coffee's as of yet.
 
George
 
--

5) From: kevin creason
Eek!
I think I ruined a batch of panama cata gesha.
I had people watching over my shoulder (and I always ruin burgers when that
happens too) and I stopped it too soon.
It's speckled looking but kind of dark which is what got me, lots of chaff
still on the bean, very green tasting, and boy did the mill have trouble
running those beans through!
Any chance it may come out better if I throw it back for a bit? I don't
think it can be any worse.
-Kevin

6) From: Justin Marquez
Put it back and roast it some more... what's to lose?  I have done this
before with a drum roast that I pulled too soon and it worked out OK.  Not
the best roast I ever ended up with but better than tossing it out!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 8/13/07, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>
--

7) From: Michael I
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
That's too bad, Kevin, but better than over-roasting it.  I've successfully
re-roasted a batch when the power died on me part-way through one.  I doubt
I could have told the difference in a blind taste.  Of course, it wasn't a
Gesha.
Your comment about the mill having trouble just triggered something with me,
too.  I roasted a Kochere District Yirg to City, and though the cup was
wonderful, I was barely able to get it through my Zass 151, mostly because
there's a limited amount of space to grip the mill.  If I had the knee mill,
it would have been better.  But after a really tough time grinding that
Yirg, I put the Poco Fundo (at FC+) through it, and it was like buttah.  It
just occurred to me [slap] that it was because of the roast, not because of
the bean.  Probably obvious to everyone else, especially the hand-crankers
out there, but since most of my stuff goes through the Macap, I hadn't
really experienced it before.
Anyway, good luck with that Gesha.
-AdkMike  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of kevin creason
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 4:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +ruined panama mama cata gesha
Eek!
I think I ruined a batch of panama cata gesha.
I had people watching over my shoulder (and I always ruin burgers when that
happens too) and I stopped it too soon.
It's speckled looking but kind of dark which is what got me, lots of chaff
still on the bean, very green tasting, and boy did the mill have trouble
running those beans through! 
Any chance it may come out better if I throw it back for a bit? I don't
think it can be any worse.
-Kevin

8) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i have done this in the past and it has worked.... i say give it a
shot... this time listen for a crack
Dennis

9) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Grind chore difficulty probably a bit of both. The Yirg' is a much harder
bean than the Brazil.
 
Re-roast Gesha wise, absolutely agree attempt to save it with a double
roast.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael I
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 3:32 PM
That's too bad, Kevin, but better than over-roasting it.  I've successfully
re-roasted a batch when the power died on me part-way through one.  I doubt
I could have told the difference in a blind taste.  Of course, it wasn't a
Gesha.
Your comment about the mill having trouble just triggered something with me,
too.  I roasted a Kochere District Yirg to City, and though the cup was
wonderful, I was barely able to get it through my Zass 151, mostly because
there's a limited amount of space to grip the mill.  If I had the knee mill,
it would have been better.  But after a really tough time grinding that
Yirg, I put the Poco Fundo (at FC+) through it, and it was like buttah.  It
just occurred to me [slap] that it was because of the roast, not because of
the bean.  Probably obvious to everyone else, especially the hand-crankers
out there, but since most of my stuff goes through the Macap, I hadn't
really experienced it before.
Anyway, good luck with that Gesha.
-AdkMike

10) From: Kevin
Who knows, you may just develop a new roasting technique, The Twice Roasted
profile (similar to a twice baked potato or refried beans).
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

11) From: Brett Mason
Throw it back in, take it out once it is good and brown!
Brett
On 8/13/07, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I have re-roasted a few batches in my drum roaster as well.  I 
actually have one customer that prefers certain coffee's, some 
sumatras to be exact, to be ejected early, let set a few minutes and 
then put back into the machine and finished roasted to about a FC+. 
I haven't tried this method on bright coffee's as of yet.
George
we've all done the re-roast! in the bigger picture i would never try 
it intentionally (ie there are roasters that actually advocate the 
technique.) it just flattens out a dynamic coffee when its probably 
better to just buy a milder, lower-grown coffee and roast it once. 
(not something I endorse either). you can double roast a yirgacheffe 
that's really nice, bright and it will make a lousy brewed cup, but a 
decent espresso. you could also just buy a mediocre yirgacheffe that 
doesn't have much high tonality, or recognize that yirg isn't your 
favorite coffee and move to something else.
tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Floyd Lozano
In my re-roasting experience, the faster you find the problem the better - 2
days ago I dumped a practice batch of Java (other source) Kali Bendo and it
was just into City (small child yelling, wife grilling chicken, and head
cold conspired to confuse my senses).  I immediately poured what I could get
of the 2lbs back into the RK drum and gave it another couple minutes.  The
coffee came out fine.  I'm glad for once that I don't have Ray's nanosecond
cooling setup ;)
-F
On 8/14/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: W. Simon
I was roasting some Uganda Bugisu when my propane tank ran out.  The next
evening, I put tried to finish the roast.  I dumped it when I thought it was
where I wanted it, let it rest, but it simply was too light.  Due to a busy
life, I wasn't able to get back to it until the next weekend.  So, with a
week's rest, I put it back in the drum for a third time.  This time I
roasted it to FC-.  It was wonderful coffee.  The flavor was just a hint
different than a Bugisu taken to FC- in one roast.  I won't say that it was
better or worse; just a tiny bit different.  The Bugisu is a very forgiving
coffee; it is wonderful at a wide range of roasts.  I'm sure there are some
coffees that aren't so forgiving.
Wes
On 8/14/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>


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