HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Gift coffee (6 msgs / 371 lines)
1) From: Bernard Gerrard
Sigh!  Sometimes a thankless endeavor.  My theory is bad coffee is an 
acquired taste that many folks grew up with.  "And thats the way I like 
it."  My gifts have been graciously received but that is the last that 
is heard of it.  Stephan"s Mom in the other hand is the ideal convert.  
To paraphrase;  "Do not cast your good coffee beans before 
swine.....etc."  Also I suspect the most elementary homeroast and 
brewing rituals are too much trouble for many. Measure, pour, brief 
wait, swill down and outahere.  Bernard C. Gerrard

2) From: Stephen Carey
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Bernard,
I understand your point.  I was warned not to use the more expensive 
and finest of coffees as gifts.  At first it didn't make sense to me, 
but then just as you put it, I got it.  The theory of Bernard is 
correct, that bad coffee is an acquired taste and that many folks 
have grown up with it.  It is what they know.
I was lucky, my mother has always had good coffee from a local 
roaster in the house.  Her big thing was that she likes to help out 
the establishment where she gets her freshly roasted coffee, if is a 
small store in the town in which she lives.  But, that didn't stop 
her from going over and telling her that I had given her some home 
roasted coffee, after I left.
Now, this guy could have reacted a few ways, instead he started 
telling her about different beans, what she has been buying, how he 
roasts it in an industrial roaster versus how "her son" might have to 
roast it.  Then, he gave her his email address so I could contact him 
with questions.   And, should she really get into it he will help her 
out anyway her can.  Including letting she and her husband come over 
for some roasts.
I think this is good business.  She will still have to shop there at 
times, not everyone wants to roast coffee and she will recommend his 
shop for a cup or a pound.  He will be happy to help her for it is 
just who he is.  A kind man, who loves coffee.  And I think he is 
happy to have someone really interested in his art.
The best line my mother said is taken from one I read here in 
someone's tag line: "this isn't buying coffee, this is creating art 
and enjoying it in a very personal way."
She may read this, I hope she has started on this list.  I know she 
has travels right now, but still, when she returns she can 
start.  Heck, she can place her orders while traveling.
I am very happy I did not use the finest coffee I have for a gift, 
for it is a slim chance that someone will react that way, but she 
could see how much fun I was having, even if I didn't hit perfection 
and she was hooked.  The total best part is she had me make 
Sweetmarias.com her home page on her browser.  I hope the excitement 
doesn't wear off, I don't think it will.  I am just pleased that 
someone celebrating a birthday in their 70's will try new things and 
will take the time to enjoy the finer things in life.
My brother, he thought the coffee was "good."   And how "cool" it was 
I made it.  When I went to see him the next day they had their store 
name canned coffee brewing for its 3rd hour on the stove, the bag of 
beans on the counter - "to be saved for special occasions."  They 
tasted nothing different.  Fine, they liked that I took the time to 
make something myself.  So glad it wasn't the best of my very small stash.
All the best,
Stephen
At 05:06 PM 8/14/2007, you wrote:
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Bernard,
I understand your point.  I was warned not to use the more expensive
and finest of coffees as gifts.  At first it didn't make sense to
me, but then just as you put it, I got it.  The theory of Bernard is
correct, that bad coffee is an acquired taste and that many folks have
grown up with it.  It is what they know.  
I was lucky, my mother has always had good coffee from a local roaster in
the house.  Her big thing was that she likes to help out the
establishment where she gets her freshly roasted coffee, if is a small
store in the town in which she lives.  But, that didn't stop her
from going over and telling her that I had given her some home roasted
coffee, after I left.
Now, this guy could have reacted a few ways, instead he started telling
her about different beans, what she has been buying, how he roasts it in
an industrial roaster versus how "her son" might have to roast
it.  Then, he gave her his email address so I could contact him with
questions.   And, should she really get into it he will help
her out anyway her can.  Including letting she and her husband come
over for some roasts.
I think this is good business.  She will still have to shop there at
times, not everyone wants to roast coffee and she will recommend his shop
for a cup or a pound.  He will be happy to help her for it is just
who he is.  A kind man, who loves coffee.  And I think he is
happy to have someone really interested in his art.
The best line my mother said is taken from one I read here in someone's
tag line: "this isn't buying coffee, this is creating art and
enjoying it in a very personal way."
She may read this, I hope she has started on this list.  I know she
has travels right now, but still, when she returns she can start. 
Heck, she can place her orders while traveling.  
I am very happy I did not use the finest coffee I have for a gift, for it
is a slim chance that someone will react that way, but she could see how
much fun I was having, even if I didn't hit perfection and she was
hooked.  The total best part is she had me make Sweetmarias.com her
home page on her browser.  I hope the excitement doesn't wear off, I
don't think it will.  I am just pleased that someone celebrating a
birthday in their 70's will try new things and will take the time to
enjoy the finer things in life.
My brother, he thought the coffee was "good."   And
how "cool" it was I made it.  When I went to see him the
next day they had their store name canned coffee brewing for its 3rd hour
on the stove, the bag of beans on the counter - "to be saved for
special occasions."  They tasted nothing different.  Fine,
they liked that I took the time to make something myself.  So glad
it wasn't the best of my very small stash.
All the best,
Stephen
At 05:06 PM 8/14/2007, you wrote:
Sigh!  Sometimes a
thankless endeavor.  My theory is bad coffee is an acquired taste
that many folks grew up with.  "And thats the way I like
it."  My gifts have been graciously received but that is the
last that is heard of it.  Stephan"s Mom in the other hand is
the ideal convert.  
To paraphrase;  "Do not cast your good coffee beans before
swine.....etc."  Also I suspect the most elementary homeroast
and brewing rituals are too much trouble for many. Measure, pour, brief
wait, swill down and outahere.  Bernard C. Gerrard
homeroast mailing list
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3) From: Floyd Lozano
If they can't taste the difference, there's a lot of reasons for that.  You
can make the best coffees taste really awful if you brew them wrong, grind
them wrong, or never clean your equipment.  Try running some of your premium
coffee through the office coffee maker and you'll see what I mean.  3 hours
on the stove will do for coffee what cooking for 3 hours will do for almost
anything (barbeque and big birds aside) delicate.
At least tell them to freeze your beans!
-F
On 8/15/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
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4) From: Stephen Carey
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True, I am sure I can make good beans taste quite bad.  But, since 
others were raving as I was told they would and I knew it to be good, 
I am sure it is a few things:
1) they don't wash their coffee brewer because "as you brew you are 
working in the good flavors from the coffee;
2) they percolated, but left it sitting for a long time until they tried it.
3) this is the truth and sad: "it must be a DC thing, for here, we 
don't need to be special and have special coffees, they all are the 
same anyway."  Said by sister-in-law, who thought we were "uppity" 
when they were here and we served dinner with two forks, one for the salad.
I thought it might be a waste, but wanted to try.  And, had I not 
tasted it before I gave it to them I wouldn't worry about 
it.  Actually, I am not worried about it.  They can like or not, it 
was a gift, my brother thought it was nice, enough for me.  Only 
thing that changes is a different gift next time.  Maybe one of the 
large, used coffee bags that I bought from Sweet Maria's.  I showed 
them one and they loved it.  They would like to make a quilt, 
covering one side with a comfortable material, but letting the really 
colorful sides show.  Easy enough to give, they already like it, and 
at $2 a piece I can certainly swing it.
What counts is that I enjoy it, keep my brewing equipment clean, 
along with my roasting equipment, and that I know I have so much more to learn.
At 01:29 AM 8/17/2007, you wrote:
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True, I am sure I can make good beans taste quite bad. 
But, since others were raving as I was told they would and I knew it to
be good, I am sure it is a few things:
1) they don't wash their coffee brewer because "as you brew you are
working in the good flavors from the coffee;
2) they percolated, but left it sitting for a long time until they tried
it.
3) this is the truth and sad: "it must be a DC thing, for here, we
don't need to be special and have special coffees, they all are the same
anyway."  Said by sister-in-law, who thought we were
"uppity" when they were here and we served dinner with two
forks, one for the salad.  
I thought it might be a waste, but wanted to try.  And, had I not
tasted it before I gave it to them I wouldn't worry about it. 
Actually, I am not worried about it.  They can like or not, it was a
gift, my brother thought it was nice, enough for me.  Only thing
that changes is a different gift next time.  Maybe one of the large,
used coffee bags that I bought from Sweet Maria's.  I showed them
one and they loved it.  They would like to make a quilt, covering
one side with a comfortable material, but letting the really colorful
sides show.  Easy enough to give, they already like it, and at $2 a
piece I can certainly swing it.
What counts is that I enjoy it, keep my brewing equipment clean, along
with my roasting equipment, and that I know I have so much more to
learn.
At 01:29 AM 8/17/2007, you wrote:
If they can't taste the
difference, there's a lot of reasons for that.  You can make the
best coffees taste really awful if you brew them wrong, grind them wrong,
or never clean your equipment.  Try running some of your premium
coffee through the office coffee maker and you'll see what I mean. 
3 hours on the stove will do for coffee what cooking for 3 hours will do
for almost anything (barbeque and big birds aside) delicate. 
 
At least tell them to freeze your beans! 
-F
 
On 8/15/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
  When I went to see him the next day they had their store name
canned coffee brewing for its 3rd hour on the stove, the bag of beans on
the counter - "to be saved for special occasions."  They
tasted nothing different.  
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5) From: Floyd Lozano
I know I'm preaching to the choir but:
1) that's like not washing your milk glass for a month because you want to
work in the flavors of the milk.  Yum!
2) that's like leaving popcorn in a running microwave until you're ready for
it.
3) there's nothing uppity about wanting better quality.  is it uppity to
want to live in a house of brick instead of cardboard?
some people just don't like to hear their way isn't the best way, I guess!
maybe when they are not looking, clean out their coffee maker and run a good
batch through it.  watch their faces light up in awe and wonder at real
coffee ;)   Or, go home, roast up some Gesha, and sip and marvel at how
wonderful life is with such miracles as good coffee.
-F
On 8/17/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
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6) From: Stephen Carey
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Amen to that.  I spoke to my brother today and gave him the vinegar 
recipe for cleaning his machine.  But, I was bested by my mother 
giving him a decent, clean and new brewer.  She has taken up the 
cause stronger than I have.  I figure if they don't want better, 
fine.  She feels that if I roasted it, and others took the time to 
make sure I bought the best, they are going to taste it as it was 
meant to be.  Pretty funny, but what a convert she is.  She doesn't 
even want to go back to the truly decent and fresh coffee she was 
buying from a local roaster.  Though she will, until I can get some 
more to her.
And, I am still serving two forks with a proper meal.
At 01:24 AM 8/18/2007, you wrote:
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Amen to that.  I spoke to my brother today and gave him
the vinegar recipe for cleaning his machine.  But, I was bested by
my mother giving him a decent, clean and new brewer.  She has taken
up the cause stronger than I have.  I figure if they don't want
better, fine.  She feels that if I roasted it, and others took the
time to make sure I bought the best, they are going to taste it as it was
meant to be.  Pretty funny, but what a convert she is.  She
doesn't even want to go back to the truly decent and fresh coffee she was
buying from a local roaster.  Though she will, until I can get some
more to her.  
And, I am still serving two forks with a proper meal.
At 01:24 AM 8/18/2007, you wrote:
I know I'm preaching to the
choir but:
1) that's like not washing your milk glass for a month because you want
to work in the flavors of the milk.  Yum!
2) that's like leaving popcorn in a running microwave until you're ready
for it.
3) there's nothing uppity about wanting better quality.  is it
uppity to want to live in a house of brick instead of cardboard?
 
some people just don't like to hear their way isn't the best way, I
guess!  maybe when they are not looking, clean out their coffee
maker and run a good batch through it.  watch their faces light up
in awe and wonder at real coffee ;)   Or, go home, roast up
some Gesha, and sip and marvel at how wonderful life is with such
miracles as good coffee. 
-F
 
On 8/17/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
True, I am sure I can make good beans taste quite bad.  But,
since others were raving as I was told they would and I knew it to be
good, I am sure it is a few things:
1) they don't wash their coffee brewer because "as you brew you
are working in the good flavors from the coffee; 
2) they percolated, but left it sitting for a long time until they
tried it.
3) this is the truth and sad: "it must be a DC thing, for here,
we don't need to be special and have special coffees, they all are the
same anyway."  Said by sister-in-law, who thought we were
"uppity" when they were here and we served dinner with two
forks, one for the salad.  
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