HomeRoast Digest


Topic: my best yet - a nice surprise (3 msgs / 138 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Well, after about 18 roasts I can say that I have hit one of which I 
am very pleased.  After this foray to visit my mother and taking her 
my first gift coffee, I found I was very short on coffee for me.  I 
had some that was about 9 days old, an Mexico FTO to Full City +, 
which was still good, but not super fresh.
I wanted to try the Ethiopia Kochere District Yirgacheffe I had on 
hand.  I had not tried any Yirg beans and this was the right time, I 
felt.  I have learned through trial and error what you all know, what 
will bring one bean to City + will not necessarily bring another type 
to City +.  Through what I have read about the region and the bean 
itself I had a sense of how to bring it to City +, not go past it and 
also not stop too short.
I can't say I hit is right on.  Also, I am drinking it 18 hours after 
the roast, but WOW, it is a mouthful of an immense flavors which flow 
over the tongue.  I think I can get it to its sweet spot - or what I 
imagine it to be since I have never had it before, with one more 
roast.  But, I have never been this close on a first roast of a bean.
I can honestly taste the nutmeg (which blows my mind, where does that 
flavor come from), I feel the brightness of the coffee, while at 
first tasting a hint of lime.  I am truly pleased to have gotten 
close, but more, I am happy to have a nice coffee to sip as I 
work.  I gave some to my associate producer and he loves it - and he 
speaks his mind.  He didn't know what the flavors were, but he used 
the words. "it is almost alive with flavors."  Then he paid  the 
coffee the ultimate compliment.  He did not add his usual small touch 
of sugar and cream.  I would NOT have been insulted if he did, for he 
may drink his coffee however he feels it tastes best.  However, when 
asked, he said this coffee didn't need to be toned down.  He was 
afraid it might lose some of the flavor.  I don't know if it would, 
for all I know, adding them may have brought out other flavors.
I don't write this to brag (too much) but really to say that if I can 
make a solid roast anyone can if they use the tools that are offered 
here in the way of help and if they are patient.  The tribute to this 
wonderful coffee goes to Tom for selecting it, the orchard for 
growing it so well, then to you all who continually help me through this.
I can't wait to see how this coffee rounds out as it hits 24 and then 
48 hours.
Thank you all for your help.

2) From: Les
Great Job Stephen!  And if I remember correctly you are using an I-Roast.
In my personal opinion I think that the I-roast is one of the more difficult
roasters for a new roaster to learn on.  With the way it varies the fluid
bed and the option of many profiles as well as the noise the obscures the
cracks, it is more of a challenge.  So kuddos to you!  That said, you won't
outgrow the I-roast as fast as some other roasters.
Les
On 8/15/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
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3) From: Stephen Carey
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Les, your memory is great.  I do like the machine.  As much as I want 
to use some of the others out there, I first want to really get to 
know this machine, make many roasts on it, then, when I feel I have 
done what I can with it, I can move on.  Right now, it is very good 
(for me) to learn on.  After last nights roast I feel very 
good.  But, I am still learning so much.  With every roast comes, 
besides good coffee, more questions, how to make it better, how to 
roast the coffee as it wants to be roasted, all sorts of things.  So, 
while each roast is a lesson, it is also a door to more to be learned.
I love doing this, I love the coffee, as always, but I really love 
doing this.  I like seeing people's faces when they taste good coffee 
and, better yet, when I explain that it is not out of reach for 
them.  Heck, if I can do it between chemo treatments, the pain clinic 
and all of that, plus running a company, I have NO doubt that others 
can do the same.  As a matter of fact, the associate producer I 
talked about today went on line, looked around.  Then asked if he 
could see the IR2, my roasting notes, the green coffee, the whole 
thing.  He was working up costs so that he may take it on.  I can't 
say he will be a home roaster, but I think the odds are good.
This coffee has strong powers.
At 05:56 PM 8/15/2007, you wrote:
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Les, your memory is great.  I do like the
machine.  As much as I want to use some of the others out there, I
first want to really get to know this machine, make many roasts on it,
then, when I feel I have done what I can with it, I can move on. 
Right now, it is very good (for me) to learn on.  After last nights
roast I feel very good.  But, I am still learning so much. 
With every roast comes, besides good coffee, more questions, how to make
it better, how to roast the coffee as it wants to be roasted, all sorts
of things.  So, while each roast is a lesson, it is also a door to
more to be learned.
I love doing this, I love the coffee, as always, but I really love doing
this.  I like seeing people's faces when they taste good coffee and,
better yet, when I explain that it is not out of reach for them. 
Heck, if I can do it between chemo treatments, the pain clinic and all of
that, plus running a company, I have NO doubt that others can do the
same.  As a matter of fact, the associate producer I talked about
today went on line, looked around.  Then asked if he could see the
IR2, my roasting notes, the green coffee, the whole thing.  He was
working up costs so that he may take it on.  I can't say he will be
a home roaster, but I think the odds are good.
This coffee has strong powers.
At 05:56 PM 8/15/2007, you wrote:
Great Job Stephen!  And if
I remember correctly you are using an I-Roast.  In my personal
opinion I think that the I-roast is one of the more difficult roasters
for a new roaster to learn on.  With the way it varies the fluid bed
and the option of many profiles as well as the noise the obscures the
cracks, it is more of a challenge.  So kuddos to you!  That
said, you won't outgrow the I-roast as fast as some other roasters. 
 
Les
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