HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Latte Art Help (12 msgs / 478 lines)
1) From: Barry Luterman
Froth time was 1 min 25 sec seems a bit long for a Silvia. Couldn't see your 
thermometer should be keep probe deep in milk till 80 degrees. Pull probe 
shallow till milk swirls. keep at same depth swirling milk till 140 degrees. 
As far as pouring art it's a practice thing. Never really interested me 
much. I kind of equate it to paper umbrellas in Fou Fou drinks.

2) From: Michael Wisniewski
Thank you for the tips.  When you say 'probe', do you mean thermometer
probe or the frothing tip?
I always followed surfing the surface until ~100 degrees then heat
until 150.  You also mentioned that it took me awhile to froth (1:25).
 Approximately, what kind of timeframe should I be looking for?
Should it be half that?
Thanks again for the feedback!!!!
Mike
On 8/17/07, Barry Luterman  wrote:
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3) From: Barry Luterman
Too long and too hot even though that's what WLL advises on their website. 
You have meringue rather than microfoam.
1. Cold milk
2 Frother tip deep in milk till 80 deg.
3 Frother tip just below surface so that no big bubbles appear and milk 
swirls. Takes some practice.
4 As milk expands withdraw tip so it remains just under surface and milk 
keeps swirling. Stop at 140 deg

4) From: Sandy Andina
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I was about to say the same thing--I have an older Silvia and it  
froths much faster. I used to use a thermometer till I switched to a  
Livia, which steams inordinately fast even with a 2-hole aftermarket  
tip; now that I'm back to using Silvia while Livia's away, I find  
that the thermometer is a hindrance.  I stretch till the pitcher  
feels slightly warmer than body temp, then sink and get that eddy  
going w/o visible bubbles till it's too hot to touch for more than a  
second or two. I then bang the pitcher and swirl slightly.  But I  
pull the shots first (right into the cup for milk drinks) and then  
pour the froth right after steaming. I've found that if I froth  
first, it separates as it stands into thicker foam on top and steamed  
milk beneath--though you might sacrifice some crema by doing the  
shots first, you're pouring better-integrated froth. I also tilt the  
cup, keep the spout near the crema surface and pour into the near  
side of the cup  till the white dot appears on the far side, then  
raise the pitcher high and pour from a higher altitude, jiggling as I  
draw it back toward where it started, and finish with a quick stroke  
back to the far side.
On Aug 17, 2007, at 4:11 PM, Barry Luterman wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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I was about to say the same =
thing--I have an older Silvia and it froths much faster. I used to use a =
thermometer till I switched to a Livia, which steams inordinately fast =
even with a 2-hole aftermarket tip; now that I'm back to using Silvia =
while Livia's away, I find that the thermometer is a hindrance.  I =
stretch till the pitcher feels slightly warmer than body temp, then sink =
and get that eddy going w/o visible bubbles till it's too hot to touch =
for more than a second or two. I then bang the pitcher and swirl =
slightly.  But I pull the shots first (right into the cup for milk =
drinks) and then pour the froth right after steaming. I've found that if =
I froth first, it separates as it stands into thicker foam on top and =
steamed milk beneath--though you might sacrifice some crema by doing the =
shots first, you're pouring better-integrated froth. I also tilt the =
cup, keep the spout near the crema surface and pour into the near side =
of the cup  till the white dot appears on the far side, then raise the =
pitcher high and pour from a higher altitude, jiggling as I draw it back =
toward where it started, and finish with a quick stroke back to the far =
side.
On Aug 17, 2007, at 4:11 PM, Barry Luterman =
wrote:
Froth time was 1 min 25 sec = seems a bit long for a Silvia. Couldn't see your thermometer should be = keep probe deep in milk till 80 degrees. Pull probe shallow till milk = swirls. keep at same depth swirling milk till 140 degrees. As far as = pouring art it's a practice thing. Never really interested me much. I = kind of equate it to paper umbrellas in Fou Fou drinks. -----  Original Message ----- From: = "Michael Wisniewski" <wiz561>To: <homeroast= s.com>Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 = 10:05 AMSubject: +OT: Latte Art = Help Hi! I'm having = some problems with my Latte Art.  = I posted a message oncoffeegeek = about it last night, but was hoping to get some otheropinions as well.  If anybody can comment on = what I'm doing wrong,that would be most = excellent.  Here is a URL = of a video I made...http://www.youtube.c=om/watch?v=1vunm3jSm5Y When I first started frothing, = there was too much pressure and Iaccidentally = made some large bubbles.  = :-(  But besides = that, if anybodycan give any insight on what I'm = doing wrong, that would be awesome. Thanks in advanced... homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings  homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-38-802004295--

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
Barry,
Your milk steaming method may work for you but it is counter to every
instruction I've been taught, including from numerous professional barista
and trainers. It's a good idea to start the tip deep when initially starting
the steam to avoid large air bubbles but the steam tip should immediately be
brought up for the pst pst pst stretching - injecting the air. How long to
stretch (ie how hot) depends on the desired consistency, 80 degrees or so
for latte maybe 100 for a cap. Then proceed to incorporating the foam into
the milk via the vigourous swirl for silky pourable microfoam.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
  
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6) From: Barry Luterman
Mike I don't see any difference in our methods.I start deep till 80 deg than 
pull up to stretch till 140 deg

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Barry,
Maybe it's a semantics thing but I don't think so. Stretching is normally
suggested at the beginning of steaming not the end to achieve good silky
micro foam. Stretching while the milk is hotter creates stiffer dryer
meringue like foam, which is fine if that's what you're going for. And as
you say you don't attempt free pour milk art. 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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8) From: Barry Luterman
Mike we do exactly the same thing. Just my describing it comes out 
different.Maybe I should make a video or better yet come for a visit.Will 
see how Vegas goes.If my back holds up to a 6 hour flight,12 hour poker 
sessions and walking from the parking lots to the Casinos them a trip to 
Portland might be in my future. This is my last week of Physical Therapy.

9) From: MichaelB
Don't immerse TIP DEEP into the pitcher, just immerse it TIP-DEEP, i.e. near
the surface. Reread the original post with the imagined dash. You two are in
violent agreement.
On 8/18/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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MichaelB

10) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes now it makes sense and I still think latte art does little to =
enhance the enjoyment of good coffee. It's like putting fruit and a =
paper umbrella in a 30 year double malt scotch.

11) From: John Moody
Barry’s method is opposite tradition.  Barry specifically states: “As milk
expands withdraw tip so it remains just under surface and milk keeps
swirling. Stop at 140 deg”
John

12) From:
Latte art is like a trademark-proof the barista knows what he/she is doing, and that the drink is probably going to be good. If you can put a tree in my drink, you can at least froth well, and you probalbly understand how to make a good shot.
---- MichaelB  wrote: 
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