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Topic: bummed out (3 msgs / 171 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
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Well, it was bound to happen, I would do too many things at once and 
forget to watch the beans.  I was roasting my first ever roast of 
Costa Rica Naranjo Caracol Peaberry.  I had really cleaned and worked 
on our ceiling fan, so it would actually let the heat out rather than 
trapping it and running hot.  I was watching the thermometer on the 
counter go up and hit each cycle, the temp was almost right on each 
time.  This was a major improvement.  I had realized that with the 
poorly working fan the heat was just being held in a tunnel and the 
chamber and that might be adding to the high temp on the IR2 - more 
out of whack than expected.
Well, I heard first crack begin and should have sat in front of the 
roaster and watched the rest of the roast.  A few seconds later I 
heard it blow through the first crack way too fast, I looked over, 
sat down and watched the oil patches appear.  I hit the cool cycle, 
knowing I had missed my City +.  I am kind of bummed.  I know what I 
did, which is just from doing too much.
I had set some new profiles and when I went to set it for this roast 
I went up to far, even wrote down my error and got what I got.  The 
crunch test was okay, at best.  It was not charcoal, thank 
goodness.  This is the first roast where I didn't let my senses 
really have a say in things, where I had diverted my attention to 
numbers on a thermometer and not on the beans.
I am going to brew it after a decent rest and see what it is like.  I 
assume I am not the first to over roast, but I feel silly, I should 
be past that by now.  I hope my roast later tonight turns out as 
planned.  I love this coffee, so I know what it should taste 
like.  Tom's review says it is okay at FC and FC+, so I should be all 
right, but still feel like I hurt the bean.  This is silly, but I 
take it like I did harm to something very special.  Maybe I need to 
relax a bit with this roasting and have fun and not get so wound up 
about being perfect after not even 20 roasts.
That's it.  I have been on here about when things went well, it 
seemed only fair to post when I blew it.  I am still hoping that the 
bean will hold up at this roast.  Time will tell. 
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Well, it was bound to happen, I would do too many things at once and
forget to watch the beans.  I was roasting my first ever roast of
Costa Rica Naranjo Caracol Peaberry.  I had really
cleaned and worked on our ceiling fan, so it would actually let the heat
out rather than trapping it and running hot.  I was watching the
thermometer on the counter go up and hit each cycle, the temp was almost
right on each time.  This was a major improvement.  I had
realized that with the poorly working fan the heat was just being held in
a tunnel and the chamber and that might be adding to the high temp on the
IR2 - more out of whack than expected.
Well, I heard first crack begin and should have sat in front of the
roaster and watched the rest of the roast.  A few seconds later I
heard it blow through the first crack way too fast, I looked over, sat
down and watched the oil patches appear.  I hit the cool cycle,
knowing I had missed my City +.  I am kind of bummed.  I know
what I did, which is just from doing too much.
I had set some new profiles and when I went to set it for this roast I
went up to far, even wrote down my error and got what I got.  The
crunch test was okay, at best.  It was not charcoal, thank
goodness.  This is the first roast where I didn't let my senses
really have a say in things, where I had diverted my attention to numbers
on a thermometer and not on the beans.
I am going to brew it after a decent rest and see what it is like. 
I assume I am not the first to over roast, but I feel silly, I should be
past that by now.  I hope my roast later tonight turns out as
planned.  I love this coffee, so I know what it should taste
like.  Tom's review says it is okay at FC and FC+, so I should be
all right, but still feel like I hurt the bean.  This is silly, but
I take it like I did harm to something very special.  Maybe I need
to relax a bit with this roasting and have fun and not get so wound up
about being perfect after not even 20 roasts.  
That's it.  I have been on here about when things went well, it
seemed only fair to post when I blew it.  I am still hoping that the
bean will hold up at this roast.  Time will tell.
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2) From: Lynne Biziewski
The roasts that are messed up teach us more than the perfect ones.
Lynne

3) From: Stephen Carey
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You are so right.  I just finished a second roast, same bean, and it 
came very close.  It looks beautiful, but it will be 24 hours until I 
know for sure.  The crunch test was full of flavor.  What I did was 
throw away this idea I had that every roast needed only 3 cycles.  I 
went to four, and was much more gentle with the bean.  It still 
roasted fast, faster than other peaberrys I have roasted, but I let 
my senses back in.  For me, so far, my best roasts have been when I 
get the equipment close, but I listen, smell and look carefully, then 
I can feel when to stop it and when I wish I could go longer.  I knew 
I was being too harsh with this bean in the profiles I had written.
I also think some of it is the hormones, started hormonal therapy the 
other day, I am sitting here having hot flashes, feeling flush, but 
more, feeling emotional over my beans.  This is my third course of 
hormonal therapy, I swear, the chemo was easier.
But, the important thing here is that I keep an open mind to learning 
from my mistakes, you are right on Lynne.  Thank you.  Had I not been 
familiar with roasting to some extent I might have let that first 
roast slide, but I knew something was wrong, all I could figure was 
too high of heat, too fast, and just kind of being rough with it, if 
that makes sense.  The new profile is very close, time will tell.  I 
am keeping copious notes, but they are about the smell, look, and 
sound, as well as the temp. and time at each cycle.
I love this stuff. (see, those darn emotions:)
At 09:20 PM 8/18/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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You are so right.  I just finished a second roast, same
bean, and it came very close.  It looks beautiful, but it will be 24
hours until I know for sure.  The crunch test was full of
flavor.  What I did was throw away this idea I had that every roast
needed only 3 cycles.  I went to four, and was much more gentle with
the bean.  It still roasted fast, faster than other peaberrys I have
roasted, but I let my senses back in.  For me, so far, my best
roasts have been when I get the equipment close, but I listen, smell and
look carefully, then I can feel when to stop it and when I wish I could
go longer.  I knew I was being too harsh with this bean in the
profiles I had written.  
I also think some of it is the hormones, started hormonal therapy the
other day, I am sitting here having hot flashes, feeling flush, but more,
feeling emotional over my beans.  This is my third course of
hormonal therapy, I swear, the chemo was easier.
But, the important thing here is that I keep an open mind to learning
from my mistakes, you are right on Lynne.  Thank you.  Had I
not been familiar with roasting to some extent I might have let that
first roast slide, but I knew something was wrong, all I could figure was
too high of heat, too fast, and just kind of being rough with it, if that
makes sense.  The new profile is very close, time will tell.  I
am keeping copious notes, but they are about the smell, look, and sound,
as well as the temp. and time at each cycle.
I love this stuff. (see, those darn emotions:)
At 09:20 PM 8/18/2007, you wrote:
The roasts that are messed up
teach us more than the perfect ones.
Lynne
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