HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: full circle - almost (3 msgs / 237 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Hi, all.  Tom does such a great job in describing the beans he gets 
for us to purchase, the cupping experience (something I have never 
done in a truly formal manner, but can't wait to try), and the 
flavors, roasting tips, all of it, that I feel it important to share 
it with a gift of coffee.
I like to include a good portion his description on a piece of paper 
or card when I have gifted coffee, which, to date, has only been a 
few times.  What is fun is that I use paper made from coffee chaff or 
the by-product of the processing, maybe even roasting chaff that I 
pick up in Costa Rica.  The paper is slightly brownish, a bit bumpy, 
but fun.  Also, it shows part of Costa Rica's commitment to the 
environment, for they make paper from bananas also, as I am sure 
other countries do as well.
So, the cards I have been including are on coffee paper, containing 
the history of the coffee beans in the roast.  While the experience 
of cupping it isn't their own, they have all said that getting the 
information helps them in the appreciation of coffee in general, in 
what I am doing, and in what goes into a cup of quality coffee 
(which, for now, isn't always the best from my roasts, though each 
roast teaches me something).
That's it.  It is fun that I can use coffee all the way in the 
process, in some form, other than the bag.  I don't know if a bag 
would be possible.  I also know that the biggest market for the 
coffee paper is for tourists, but I have seen it used at our bank 
down there, in the little grocery store we go to, even our alarm 
company guy came out with a notebook which was made up of coffee 
pages, so it is getting more and more use.
(Note: the banana paper, if you haven't tried it, is a bit rougher to 
write upon, for it has more pieces of the peel in it and they can be 
anything but flat at times.  Should you want to see what the coffee 
or banana paper is like before purchasing any, please feel free to 
contact me off list and I will be happy to send you a piece until I 
run out.  But, when I return to the house in a few weeks I will pick 
up another box of it, so it may take a while, but I will get you some.)
I have to be very honest, the work Tom does in writing of his 
experience seems to add to the value of the gift of the coffee.  They 
like it for it is "home roasted," but knowing the history of the 
beans gives the coffee a different level of respect in some 
way.  They don't see it as they did before, a morning or after dinner 
habit that comes out of a can or even a bag that has been sitting 
around for a month or two.
Thank you, Tom, for the work you do, it does add to the gift, as, I 
believe the coffee paper does.

2) From: Lisa Carton
cool----would love to know where you get the coffee paper from...........=
also: a friend of mine is selling really cool bags and other cool stu=
ff from recycled "trash" in Bali/indonesia-not throwaway bags but handbags,=
 laptop carriers/briefcase style bags, even umbreallas...some are made from=
 coffee products and have the cool originall graphics on them.....
 =
~~~~> Come see my Coffee Blog at http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com   
=
----- Original Message ----
From: Stephen Carey 
To: homeroast
Sent: Sunday, August 19, 2=
007 1:59:29 PM
Subject: +OT: full circle - almost
Hi, all.  Tom d=
oes such a great job in describing the beans he gets 
for us to purchase,=
 the cupping experience (something I have never 
done in a truly formal m=
anner, but can't wait to try), and the 
flavors, roasting tips, all of it=
, that I feel it important to share 
it with a gift of coffee.
I lik=
e to include a good portion his description on a piece of paper 
or card =
when I have gifted coffee, which, to date, has only been a 
few times.  W=
hat is fun is that I use paper made from coffee chaff or 
the by-product =
of the processing, maybe even roasting chaff that I 
pick up in Costa Ric=
a.  The paper is slightly brownish, a bit bumpy, 
but fun.  Also, it show=
s part of Costa Rica's commitment to the 
environment, for they make pape=
r from bananas also, as I am sure 
other countries do as well.
So, t=
he cards I have been including are on coffee paper, containing 
the histo=
ry of the coffee beans in the roast.  While the experience 
of cupping it=
 isn't their own, they have all said that getting the 
information helps =
them in the appreciation of coffee in general, in 
what I am doing, and i=
n what goes into a cup of quality coffee 
(which, for now, isn't always t=
he best from my roasts, though each 
roast teaches me something).
Th=
at's it.  It is fun that I can use coffee all the way in the 
process, in=
 some form, other than the bag.  I don't know if a bag 
would be possible=
.  I also know that the biggest market for the 
coffee paper is for touri=
sts, but I have seen it used at our bank 
down there, in the little groce=
ry store we go to, even our alarm 
company guy came out with a notebook w=
hich was made up of coffee 
pages, so it is getting more and more use.
=
(Note: the banana paper, if you haven't tried it, is a bit rougher to =
write upon, for it has more pieces of the peel in it and they can be 
=
anything but flat at times.  Should you want to see what the coffee 
or b=
anana paper is like before purchasing any, please feel free to 
contact m=
e off list and I will be happy to send you a piece until I 
run out.  But=
, when I return to the house in a few weeks I will pick 
up another box o=
f it, so it may take a while, but I will get you some.)
I have to be v=
ery honest, the work Tom does in writing of his 
experience seems to add =
to the value of the gift of the coffee.  They 
like it for it is "home ro=
asted," but knowing the history of the 
beans gives the coffee a differen=
t level of respect in some 
way.  They don't see it as they did before, a=
 morning or after dinner 
habit that comes out of a can or even a bag tha=
t has been sitting 
around for a month or two.
Thank you, Tom, for t=
he work you do, it does add to the gift, as, I 
believe the coffee paper =
does.
homeroast ma=
iling listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo c=
hange your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes)=
 go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings  ==
Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their l=
ife, your story. Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.http://sims.yahoo.com=/  

3) From: Stephen Carey
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Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
We have a house in Manuel Antonio, near Quepos, so we get there quite 
often and pick it up, plus we use it in the house and give some to 
our guests.  But, I am sure it can be ordered on-line.  The "trash" 
items sound great.  If she has a Web site, if you can send it off 
list that would be great.
At 02:09 PM 8/19/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
We have a house in Manuel Antonio, near Quepos, so we get
there quite often and pick it up, plus we use it in the house and give
some to our guests.  But, I am sure it can be ordered on-line. 
The "trash" items sound great.  If she has a Web site, if
you can send it off list that would be great.
At 02:09 PM 8/19/2007, you wrote:
cool----would love to know where
you get the coffee paper from...........
 
also: a friend of mine is selling really cool bags and other cool stuff
from recycled "trash" in Bali/indonesia-not throwaway bags but
handbags, laptop carriers/briefcase style bags, even umbreallas...some
are made from coffee products and have the cool originall graphics on
them.....
 
~~~~> Come see my
Coffee Blog at 
http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com    
----- Original Message ----
From: Stephen Carey <steve>
To: homeroast
Sent: Sunday, August 19, 2007 1:59:29 PM
Subject: +OT: full circle - almost
Hi, all.  Tom does such a great job in describing the beans he gets
for us to purchase, the cupping experience (something I have never 
done in a truly formal manner, but can't wait to try), and the 
flavors, roasting tips, all of it, that I feel it important to share
it with a gift of coffee.
I like to include a good portion his description on a piece of paper
or card when I have gifted coffee, which, to date, has only been a 
few times.  What is fun is that I use paper made from coffee chaff
or 
the by-product of the processing, maybe even roasting chaff that I 
pick up in Costa Rica.  The paper is slightly brownish, a bit bumpy,
but fun.  Also, it shows part of Costa Rica's commitment to the
environment, for they make paper from bananas also, as I am sure 
other countries do as well.
So, the cards I have been including are on coffee paper, containing 
the history of the coffee beans in the roast.  While the experience
of cupping it isn't their own, they have all said that getting the 
information helps them in the appreciation of coffee in general, in 
what I am doing, and in what goes into a cup of quality coffee 
(which, for now, isn't always the best from my roasts, though each 
roast teaches me something).
That's it.  It is fun that I can use coffee all the way in the 
process, in some form, other than the bag.  I don't know if a bag
would be possible.  I also know that the biggest market for the
coffee paper is for tourists, but I have seen it used at our bank 
down there, in the little grocery store we go to, even our alarm 
company guy came out with a notebook which was made up of coffee 
pages, so it is getting more and more use.
(Note: the banana paper, if you haven't tried it, is a bit rougher to
write upon, for it has more pieces of the peel in it and they can be
anything but flat at times.  Should you want to see what the coffee
or banana paper is like before purchasing any, please feel free to 
contact me off list and I will be happy to send you a piece until I 
run out.  But, when I return to the house in a few weeks I will pick
up another box of it, so it may take a while, but I will get you
some.)
I have to be very honest, the work Tom does in writing of his 
experience seems to add to the value of the gift of the coffee. 
They 
like it for it is "home roasted," but knowing the history of
the 
beans gives the coffee a different level of respect in some 
way.  They don't see it as they did before, a morning or after
dinner 
habit that comes out of a can or even a bag that has been sitting 
around for a month or two.
Thank you, Tom, for the work you do, it does add to the gift, as, I 
believe the coffee paper does. 
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
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