HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Guess that bean (8 msgs / 154 lines)
1) From: Randall Nortman
So my most recent roast has been quite surprising -- not at all what
it "should" have been.  I'm going to give you my tasting notes, and if
you care to play the game, guess what bean I'm talking about.  The
answer is at the end, so you're on your honor to stop reading before
the answer and make your guess.  Hints: The bean is from SM's current
stock, roasted in a modified popper to a final bean mass temperature
of 435F at 11 minutes.  First crack started at about 401F just a bit
before 8 minutes.  I would say it is a heavy City+ or maybe light FC
roast, judging from appearance.  I was aiming for C+, and went a bit
darker than I wanted to.  I brew in an Aeropress, grind in a Virtuoso.
Day 0 (4hrs): 175F, grind 5.  Very astringent from start to finish,
even with extra dilution.  But beneath the astringency I caught
occasional glimpses of a buttery, sweet coffee.  Let's hope the
astringency clears up with some rest.
Day 1: 175F, grind 5.  Astringency is completely gone.  There is a
very moderate brightness, mostly winey but also a bit citrusy.  Strong
nut-chocolate bittersweets, spice notes, and a very sweet cup overall.
Smooth, with medium body, and a buttery, savory mouthfeel.  Lingering
aftertaste of milk chocolate.
Day 2: 175F, grind 5.  The nutty bittersweets are more predominate now
than the acidity, which has become quite mild indeed.  Still quite
sweet, which works very nicely with the nut and milk chocolate bitter
notes.  There is still a hint of spice.  Body is fairly thin.
Aftertaste is - coffee flavor!
OK -- spoilers ahead.  Quit reading and make your guess...
So, it sounds a lot like a wet process central, maybe a Oaxaca?  CR
Vino de Arabia?  Could even be a Brazil, right?  Nope, this coffee is
the Kochere Yirgacheffe.  So, what's going on?  Did I roast it wrong,
are my taste buds broken, or did SM send me the wrong bean, mislabel
the bag, something like that?  And don't start telling me that 175F is
too cold to brew a yirg, because I've brewed some very snappy cups
using 175F brew water in the Aeropress.  I'm betting it's just that
the roast was heavier than it should have been and I baked out all the
acidity.  I did slow down quite a bit after first crack started,
though I never actually let the temperature drop.  And I did end up
with a very nice cup -- just not what I expected.
-- 
Randall

2) From: Leo Zick
i guessed at a guat or costa rican bean :/
On 8/21/07, Randall Nortman  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: JanoMac
I guessed Oaxaca. That's the bean I most recently roasted and had almost the
same experience. Early astringency mellowing over the days to wonderful mild
coffee with milk chocolate.
I have not roasted my Kochere Yirg yet. I can't wait!
Kirk

4) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
I wouldn't have guessed Yirgacheffe Kochere. It's possible to get 
weird roast tastes from Yirgs, especially with scorching and tipping. 
If you see even yellowing and browning early in the roast, and good 
rotation of the bean mass, you shouldn't get that. Underroasting can 
make a bright, pasty, biscuity brightness in the coffee, oftentimes 
confused for acidity, but clearly not pleasant. Astringency is 
usually due to unripes, quakers - you get those in a DP Sidamo, not 
much in a Yirg ever.
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

5) From: Leo Zick
ive never gotten astrigency from a mexican. i actually get that from sidamos
and from a yirg, thats why i stopped roasting them :(
for me, mexicans have a funky nutty type thing going on. some chocolate, but
nothing like a col or guat or brazil..
On 8/21/07, JanoMac  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Les
Randall,
My guess is you ramped your temp a little to fast through the grassy stage
of the roast.  Instead of getting the heat in the bean, you seared the
outside like a good medium rare steak.  Thus your bean is a bit under
roasted in the middle even though the appearance looks good on the outside.
Les
On 8/21/07, Randall Nortman  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Randall Nortman
On Wed, Aug 22, 2007 at 11:21:29AM -0700, Les wrote:
<Snip>
This doesn't taste under-roasted.  If the astringency hadn't gone
away, I would agree, but by 24 hours post-roast it was no longer
astringent, and instead tasted like a sweet, nutty, FC/FC+ Central
American.  It seems more likely to me that I over-roasted than
under-roasted.  (BTW, the day 3 cup, which I just finished drinking,
was very much like day 2 -- nutty, sweet, mildly bright.)
What stage is the "grassy" stage?  My usual profile is ~4 minutes to
300F (probed bean mass temperature), then ~30F/minute to first crack
at 7-8 minutes, and then slow to finish -- 10-20F/minute usually, but
as slow as 5F/min if I want to maximize body rather than brightness.
That would all be too fast for a drum roaster, but I think for a
popper it's definitely not.
By the way, just so you know what I'm talking about -- when I say
"astringent", I mean that mouth-drying, tannic sort of sensation you
often get from drinking tea or dry red wines.  I'm not talking about
bitterness.  I often get astringency from high-acid beans when they're
less than a day old, and when I screw up the roast (generally
under-roasting, it seems), the astringency doesn't go away even with
rest.

8) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
Randall,
My guess is you ramped your temp a little to fast through the grassy =
stage of the roast.  Instead of getting the heat in the bean, you seared =
the outside like a good medium rare steak.  Thus your bean is a bit =
under roasted in the middle even though the appearance looks good on the =
outside. 
Well put Les
RK


HomeRoast Digest