HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Jasmine ????? (10 msgs / 392 lines)
1) From: George
  
Okay girls and guys, what the he-- does jasmine smell and taste like?????=
???
 I have searched both SM's site for about 10 minutes or more and the
Internet for probably over 45 minutes on jasmine, jasmine flavor, jasmine
taste, etc, etc.    All I get are listings of dozens of pages on it's use=
 as
a flower in weddings, what properties it has for women in Japan, pages an=
d
pages on jasmine in tea, and the list goes on and on.  Even went to Webst=
ers
dictionary, online encyclopedias, etc, etc and nothing but uses, NOT A TH=
ING
ON TASTE.  I did visit over a hundred sites that listed jasmine and no
results for the smell or taste of it.  Tom seems to mention jasmine with
sage and other herbs/spices.  For all I know it could taste like baby kak=
a.
So, what is the taste and smell of jasmine. 
George
 
--

2) From: Tim Deines
Cook up some Jasmine rice and you will know.  It may be more of an aromatic
than a ³taste² per se.
On 8/25/07 11:44 AM, "George"  wrote:
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3) From: Sean Cary
When I had my house in South Florida - we had night blooming jasmine in the
front yard...wow.  When it bloomed it was the most amazing perfume for the
entire yard!  How do you describe it unless you have been in it...no way I
could describe that smell - but I guess I would know it in coffee.
I am one who cannot taste subtle undertones in either coffee or cigars -
both of which are described with chocolate, tobacco etc...  I taste
coffee...or cigars.
Sean
On 8/25/07, George  wrote:
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4) From: Andy Thomas
Or brew some jasmine tea. Or go to a florist. In any case, you won't be abl=
e to smell jasmine on the internet no matter how much information you find.=
From: Tim Deines 
Subject: Re: +Jasmine ???=
??
Re: +Jasmine ?????
Cook up some Jasmine rice and you wil=
l know.  It may be more of an aromatic than a “taste” per se. 
=
On 8/25/07 11:44 AM, "George"  wrote:
=
  
Okay girls and guys, what the he-- does jasmine smell and tas=
te like????????  I have searched both SM's site for about 10 minutes or mor=
e and the Internet for probably over 45 minutes on jasmine, jasmine flavor,=
 jasmine taste, etc, etc.    All I get are listings of dozens of pages on i=
t's use as a flower in weddings, what properties it has for women in Japan,=
 pages and pages on jasmine in tea, and the list goes on and on.  Even went=
 to Websters dictionary, online encyclopedias, etc, etc and nothing but use=
s, NOT A THING ON TASTE.  I did visit over a hundred sites that listed jasm=
ine and no results for the smell or taste of it.  Tom seems to mention jasm=
ine with sage and other herbs/spices.  For all I know it could taste like b=
aby kaka.
 
So, what is the taste and smell of jasmine. 
 =
George
 
--

5) From: John Brown
don't know about the taste but the fragrance is great. it reminds of 
Coronado island at night.
George wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
At 11:44 AM -0400 8/25/07, George wrote:
<Snip>
Its a very good question: I try to distinguish between jasmine tea 
and jasmine flower sometimes, but fail to do it often enough. Those 
are the 2 most meaningful definitions to me. But in fact, at my house 
i have pink jasmine and a white jasmine and they are different (my 
night-blooming jasmine failed to grow but that too is a bit 
different). All offer strong, permeating floral notes. Yirgacheffes 
often have the most clear-cut jasmine notes of any coffee, but 
sometimes I refer to it when it is a very mild floral note, not based 
on the intensity or amount of it, but the quality - i tried to 
clarify that issue in my Flavor Quality Analysis spider-graphs. I'll 
also use honeysuckle, and sometimes hibiscus, but don't often use 
rose anymore since  that's a huge variation in aromas, and I don't 
know enough to specify WHAT rose. Frankly, sometimes getting too 
specific in descriptions can hinder what i am trying to communicate, 
and just doesn't work --- i.e. it's the wet aroma of the flowers from 
recently dried coriander at 3pm on Sunday. Okay, that's a bad 
example, but there is a LOT left yet-to-be-described in the coffee 
reviews so you, the taster, can fill in the blanks. I like to 
(usually) go beyond saying something is simply 'floral' but don't 
want to kill all the fun of discovery by being overly specific (if I 
am even able to). I hope, at some point, you might notice that I try 
to keep it real, to keep descriptors firmly attached to things that 
you smell and taste, and avoid analogies like "this is the little 
black dress of coffees," or this is "coffee for the x-games", or 
"this is the honda accord of coffee". I have heard all these used 
before, and i guess they DO describe something most people 
understand, but when you start down that path there is no return ... 
it becomes an easy escape from really trying to attach coffee 
experiences to other true sensory experiences. - Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

7) From: Stephen Carey
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I think you are wonderful in your descriptions.  They put me in the 
ballpark, but let my taste buds put it over the fence.  You may say 
sweet floral, almost hibiscus and I may taste strong hibiscus with a 
touch of jasmine.  Actually, my mind is interpreting what it can from 
what it has been exposed to in the past.  You get me very close, for 
without it my mind might not go there, it might just be confused 
looking for the correct words.  I have limited experience - just did 
my 20th roast - so, all the help I can get I will take.
But more, when I can't taste any of the flavors I know I may have 
under roasted or over roasted the bean, or possibly, I taste 
something but just can't figure out what due to not knowing what a 
certain spice or floral flavor is.  However, if I can taste something 
sweet and like a bouquet, I know I am close and I will get closer as 
time goes on.
Brewing up a batch of very good herb tea made with the floral flavor 
in question works wonders for the taste and the smell - at least for me.
The chart helps also.  However, in the end it is whether the cup of 
coffee is a standout cup or does it taste bland, dull, or 
burned.  And, based on my exposure to things I may come up with words 
that are different than in the review - that's cool.  If I like it, 
if I can describe it for me, then I can usually tell if I am getting 
closer to being spot on.
I love it when someone says it has an apple flavor and I say it has 
more of a Washington Apple (I happen to know a lot about apples, 
don't know why), but put in some of the spices and I am 
lost.  Though, I do know if there is a flavor of some sort that I 
just can't name.  If it appears in a number of coffees with that in 
the description I can be fairly certain that is what is being 
described.  I can also go and buy the spice.  Again, it comes down to 
my enjoyment of the cup and how I can improve upon the roast as I 
move forward and learn more. 
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I think you are wonderful in your descriptions.  They
put me in the ballpark, but let my taste buds put it over the
fence.  You may say sweet floral, almost hibiscus and I may taste
strong hibiscus with a touch of jasmine.  Actually, my mind is
interpreting what it can from what it has been exposed to in the
past.  You get me very close, for without it my mind might not go
there, it might just be confused looking for the correct words.  I
have limited experience - just did my 20th roast - so, all the help I can
get I will take.  
But more, when I can't taste any of the flavors I know I may have under
roasted or over roasted the bean, or possibly, I taste something but just
can't figure out what due to not knowing what a certain spice or floral
flavor is.  However, if I can taste something sweet and like a
bouquet, I know I am close and I will get closer as time goes
on.
Brewing up a batch of very good herb tea made with the floral flavor in
question works wonders for the taste and the smell - at least for
me.
The chart helps also.  However, in the end it is whether the cup of
coffee is a standout cup or does it taste bland, dull, or burned. 
And, based on my exposure to things I may come up with words that are
different than in the review - that's cool.  If I like it, if I can
describe it for me, then I can usually tell if I am getting closer to
being spot on.
I love it when someone says it has an apple flavor and I say it has more
of a Washington Apple (I happen to know a lot about apples, don't know
why), but put in some of the spices and I am lost.  Though, I do
know if there is a flavor of some sort that I just can't name.  If
it appears in a number of coffees with that in the description I can be
fairly certain that is what is being described.  I can also go and
buy the spice.  Again, it comes down to my enjoyment of the cup and
how I can improve upon the roast as I move forward and learn
more.
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8) From: raymanowen
"I like to (usually) go beyond saying something is simply 'floral' but
don't want to kill all the fun of discovery by being overly specific"
- -Tom
I am still sorry that I let some fragrant and floral Vietnamese
highlands beans go from an aromatic drip ( wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

9) From: Tim Deines
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this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
Roasted Brazil Cachoeira to light Vienna a couple days ago and got intense
jasmine bouquet.  Anybody else with that experience?  I couldnıt place it a=
t
first, and thought patchouli, sweaty (itıs not easy for me to name these
qualities...so big props to Tom for all the hard work!)....  But I just now
mentioned this discussion to my partner, and she immediately identified the
Brazilian as jasmine, so I think that must be right!  In fact, Iıve had the
Sumatra Batak in the same (unwashed) jar since yesterday, and upon opening
the jar today I was hit by the same notes.  Aromatic hangover... amazing!
On 8/25/07 6:43 PM, "Stephen Carey"  wrote:
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10) From: JanoMac
Don't know if this helps, but another common floral aroma you may know is
honeysuckle. Jasmine smells like a delicate version of the more common
honeysuckle flower.
Jasmine smells "sweet," like you'd like the bees to make honey from it. The
fragrance seems to float in the air without needing much breeze & lingers
pleasantly in your head even after you have left the area. Not at all
cloying or overly-dominant in the air as some flowers can be.
I generally do not like floral aromas, but I have never overdosed on
jasmine.
Kirk


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