HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Stovetop roast (was: +Poppery roasts) (22 msgs / 607 lines)
1) From: Rick Copple
Tim Deines wrote:
<Snip>
How long did it take to get to first crack, and then second?
What I've found as a general rule, is no matter what roast level you're 
shooting for, you need to have the beans in the pan for at least 15 
minutes. First crack hits anywhere from 10 to 12 minutes, and if 
shooting for FC, usually I'm dumping at 16 minutes. Darker takes a 
little longer, but I rarely go past 20 minutes (have gone a little 
beyond on Vienna roast before).
When I first started pan/wok roasting, I was having the same problems. I 
think there were two reasons for that. One, was the above. Two was the 
bean I was using. I expected it to have a dark flavor and it kept coming 
out really, really bright, a few of them on the sour side. In part, I 
realized, that bean didn't do as well in the wok. But I think also I was 
expecting one flavor and was getting another. But I do know those few 
times that it simply was under roasted.
I developed my 15 minute rule when I wanted to go lighter on the roast, 
and realized that instead of shutting off the heat earlier, they cooked 
more completely if I stretched the roast out to 15 minutes. So if I'm 
going for a city, I'll put the burner on 4.5 instead of 5, and kick it 
down to 4 when it is going into first crack. That usually gets the city 
roast level coming out at 15 minutes or after.
I think this is in part due to the nature of pan roasting. While heat 
builds up in the mass, and the air around it does get heated, the 
majority of what cooks the beans is the heat coming from the bottom of 
the pan. So bean rotation is important for equal cooking as possible, 
and adequate time for most of the beans to hit the bottom enough times 
to cook. Shortly at the end of first crack, that seems to be when the 
bean mass starts radiating enough heat to accelerate the cooking 
process, which is one reason I'll turn down the heat at that point so it 
won't rush to 2nd crack. But the beans need that bottom pan time, and 
not all of them can get it at once. So it takes a little while longer.
Most other methods have a more intense heated air flowing around them 
even if their is also a hot surface, and so the heat level for each bean 
is more equalized at any one time. That condition takes a while to build 
up in a pan, especially if it is open to the air as mine usually are. 
Using a lid may change some of those dynamics, however.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

2) From: Tim Deines
That's really helpful Rick, thanks.  I'll make some adjustments and let you
know how they go.
On 9/5/07 2:29 AM, "Rick Copple"  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Barbara Wilson
I've been pan roasting for about a year now and I am very happy with the 
results. I always pre-heat the beans at the lowest temp on my stove 
until the beans feel warm then I crank it up to almost the highest temp. 
I don't remember where I got the idea to pre-heat the beans, but I did 
read everything I could find on roasting coffee when I first started. 
What do you guys think about pre-heating beans?
Tim Deines wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Rick Copple
Barbara Wilson wrote:
<Snip>
That's interesting. First, whatever works for you, do that! :)
I've not preheated the pan before, just turned it on and put the beans 
in, but I don't think I've ever started at a lower temp first and then 
went higher. As I think I mentioned recently, my experience has been not 
to slow down the ramp to 1st too much unless I'm shooting for a light 
roast. A lot of times on those I'll not preheat the wok, but I've found 
generally that I get better flavor out of the beans if I move to first 
crack at a good pace (8-12 minutes).
I might try this on some beans I don't mind loosing. What temp do you 
start with on your stove? Like, warn or a "1"?
I've never used the highest setting though, max is half way.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

5) From: Cookie (Ann-Marie)
That sounds reasonable to me, if you think of them in the same way as you w=
ould boiling eggs. They do contain moisture, and heating them too fast woul=
d seem to cause the moisture to want to escape fast. If you drop eggs (in t=
he shell) in boiling water, or bring the to the boil too fast, they crack.=
  I always get those little divots in my beans, but then, I currently us=
e a cheap little roaster. I don't think I have to vary how quickly the temp=
erature goes up.
  On the plus side, I am one step closer to my RK. My hu=
sband tried to get me to make chicken on the little teeny portable charcoal=
 grill the other night, and I refused, saying, I am a gas griller. He mumbl=
e something about having to get me a new grill!
   Cookie
 
 
http:=
//cookiestitches.blogspot.com
----- Original Message ----
From=
: Barbara Wilson 
To: homeroast=
etmarias.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2007 7:35:37 AM
Subject: Re:=
 Stovetop roast (was: +Poppery roasts)
I've been pan roasting for a=
bout a year now and I am very happy with the 
results. I always pre-heat =
the beans at the lowest temp on my stove 
until the beans feel warm then =
I crank it up to almost the highest temp. 
I don't remember where I got t=
he idea to pre-heat the beans, but I did 
read everything I could find on=
 roasting coffee when I first started. 
What do you guys think about pre-=
heating beans?
Tim Deines wrote:
>That's really helpful Rick, tha=
nks.  I'll make some adjustments and let you
>know how they go.
>
>=
>On 9/5/07 2:29 AM, "Rick Copple"  wrote:
>
>  
>=
>>Tim Deines wrote:
>>
>>    
>>
>>>Come to think of it, my last=
 two stovetop roasts have been hopelessly
>>>sour--one Kenya AA and one b=
lend.  That's disappointing because I feel like
>>>I've got good control =
there.  Any thoughts?  I'm not paying enough attention
>>>to temperatures=
 right now because of equipment limitations, fyi, though I do
>>>drop bea=
ns in on stovetop around 450, expecting the temperature to then drop
>>>i=
nto the 200s after beans and lid removal.  I then build the heat back up.=
>>>      
>>>
>>How long did it take to get to first crack, and then=
 second?
>>
>>What I've found as a general rule, is no matter what roas=
t level you're
>>shooting for, you need to have the beans in the pan for =
at least 15
>>minutes. First crack hits anywhere from 10 to 12 minutes, a=
nd if
>>shooting for FC, usually I'm dumping at 16 minutes. Darker takes =
a
>>little longer, but I rarely go past 20 minutes (have gone a little
=
<Snip>
sting, I was having the same problems. I
>>think there were two reasons f=
or that. One, was the above. Two was the
>>bean I was using. I expected i=
t to have a dark flavor and it kept coming
>>out really, really bright, a=
 few of them on the sour side. In part, I
>>realized, that bean didn't do=
 as well in the wok. But I think also I was
>>expecting one flavor and wa=
s getting another. But I do know those few
>>times that it simply was und=
er roasted.
>>
>>I developed my 15 minute rule when I wanted to go ligh=
ter on the roast,
>>and realized that instead of shutting off the heat ea=
rlier, they cooked
>>more completely if I stretched the roast out to 15 m=
inutes. So if I'm
>>going for a city, I'll put the burner on 4.5 instead =
of 5, and kick it
>>down to 4 when it is going into first crack. That usu=
ally gets the city
>>roast level coming out at 15 minutes or after.
>>=
>>I think this is in part due to the nature of pan roasting. While heat=
>>builds up in the mass, and the air around it does get heated, the
>>=
majority of what cooks the beans is the heat coming from the bottom of
>>=
the pan. So bean rotation is important for equal cooking as possible,
>>a=
nd adequate time for most of the beans to hit the bottom enough times
>>t=
o cook. Shortly at the end of first crack, that seems to be when the
>>be=
an mass starts radiating enough heat to accelerate the cooking
>>process,=
 which is one reason I'll turn down the heat at that point so it
>>won't =
rush to 2nd crack. But the beans need that bottom pan time, and
>>not all=
 of them can get it at once. So it takes a little while longer.
>>
>>Mo=
st other methods have a more intense heated air flowing around them
>>eve=
n if their is also a hot surface, and so the heat level for each bean
>>i=
s more equalized at any one time. That condition takes a while to build
>=
<Snip>
Using a lid may change some of those dynamics, however.
>>
>>    
>>=
>
>
>
>homeroast ma=
iling list
>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast>To=
 change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribe=
s) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>
> =
 
>
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ing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo cha=
nge your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) g=
o tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

6) From: Cookie (Ann-Marie)
I have answered my the question for myself with a little experiment. And I =
didn't even need to break a few eggs!
  I roasted  some of the last of my=
 Sumatra Classic Mandheling cold, and got lots of divots (Oops set off the =
smoke alarm! BRB)
  Ok, where was I? Then, I pre-heated the rest of th=
e beans on the stove, and batches two and three produced NO divots.
 Batc=
h four set off the smoke alarm. I really miss my old kitchen with the downd=
raft fan vented to the outside.
  Cookie
 
 http://cookiestitches.=blogspot.com
----- Original Message ----
From: Cookie (Ann-Mar=
ie) 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday=
, September 10, 2007 11:58:51 AM
Subject: Re: Stovetop roast (was: +Poppe=
ry roasts)
That sounds reasonable to me, if you think of them in th=
e same way as you would boiling eggs. They do contain moisture, and heating=
 them too fast would seem to cause the moisture to want to escape fast. If =
you drop eggs (in the shell) in boiling water, or bring the to the boil too=
 fast, they crack.
  I always get those little divots in my beans, but th=
en, I currently use a cheap little roaster. I don't think I have to vary ho=
w quickly the temperature goes up.
  On the plus side, I am one step clos=
er to my RK. My husband tried to get me to make chicken on the little teeny=
 portable charcoal grill the other night, and I refused, saying, I am a gas=
 griller. He mumble something about having to get me a new grill!
   Cook=
ie
 
 http://cookiestitches.blogspot.com----- Original M=
essage ----
From: Barbara Wilson 
To: h=
omeroast
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2007 7:35:37=
 AM
Subject: Re: Stovetop roast (was: +Poppery roasts)
I've been =
pan roasting for about a year now and I am very happy with the 
results. =
I always pre-heat the beans at the lowest temp on my stove 
until the bea=
ns feel warm then I crank it up to almost the highest temp. 
I don't reme=
mber where I got the idea to pre-heat the beans, but I did 
read everythi=
ng I could find on roasting coffee when I first started. 
What do you guy=
s think about pre-heating beans?
Tim Deines wrote:
>That's really=
 helpful Rick, thanks.  I'll make some adjustments and let you
>know how =
they go.
>
>
>On 9/5/07 2:29 AM, "Rick Copple"  wrote=
:
>
>  
>
>>Tim Deines wrote:
>>
>>    
>>
>>>Come to think=
 of it, my last two stovetop roasts have been hopelessly
>>>sour--one Ken=
ya AA and one blend.  That's disappointing because I feel like
>>>I've go=
t good control there.  Any thoughts?  I'm not paying enough attention
>>>=
to temperatures right now because of equipment limitations, fyi, though I d=
o
>>>drop beans in on stovetop around 450, expecting the temperature to t=
hen drop
>>>into the 200s after beans and lid removal.  I then build the =
heat back up.
>>>      
>>>
>>How long did it take to get to first cr=
ack, and then second?
>>
>>What I've found as a general rule, is no mat=
ter what roast level you're
>>shooting for, you need to have the beans in=
 the pan for at least 15
>>minutes. First crack hits anywhere from 10 to =
12 minutes, and if
>>shooting for FC, usually I'm dumping at 16 minutes. =
Darker takes a
>>little longer, but I rarely go past 20 minutes (have gon=
e a little
>>beyond on Vienna roast before).
>>
>>When I first starte=
d pan/wok roasting, I was having the same problems. I
>>think there were =
two reasons for that. One, was the above. Two was the
>>bean I was using.=
 I expected it to have a dark flavor and it kept coming
>>out really, rea=
lly bright, a few of them on the sour side. In part, I
>>realized, that b=
ean didn't do as well in the wok. But I think also I was
>>expecting one =
flavor and was getting another. But I do know those few
>>times that it s=
imply was under roasted.
>>
>>I developed my 15 minute rule when I want=
ed to go lighter on the roast,
>>and realized that instead of shutting of=
f the heat earlier, they cooked
>>more completely if I stretched the roas=
t out to 15 minutes. So if I'm
>>going for a city, I'll put the burner on=
 4.5 instead of 5, and kick it
>>down to 4 when it is going into first cr=
ack. That usually gets the city
>>roast level coming out at 15 minutes or=
 after.
>>
>>I think this is in part due to the nature of pan roasting.=
 While heat
>>builds up in the mass, and the air around it does get heate=
d, the
>>majority of what cooks the beans is the heat coming from the bot=
tom of
>>the pan. So bean rotation is important for equal cooking as poss=
ible,
>>and adequate time for most of the beans to hit the bottom enough =
times
>>to cook. Shortly at the end of first crack, that seems to be when=
 the
>>bean mass starts radiating enough heat to accelerate the cooking=
>>process, which is one reason I'll turn down the heat at that point so =
it
>>won't rush to 2nd crack. But the beans need that bottom pan time, an=
d
>>not all of them can get it at once. So it takes a little while longer=
.
>>
>>Most other methods have a more intense heated air flowing around=
 them
>>even if their is also a hot surface, and so the heat level for ea=
ch bean
>>is more equalized at any one time. That condition takes a while=
 to build
>>up in a pan, especially if it is open to the air as mine usua=
lly are.
>>Using a lid may change some of those dynamics, however.
>>=
>>    
>>
>
>
>=
>homeroast mailing list
>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo=/homeroast
>To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacati=
ons, unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personals=ettings
>
>  
>=
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/h=omeroast
To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations=
, unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsett=ings

7) From: Rich
Very good  FOODS GRILL  Same idea worked for Pavlov
--Original Message Text---
From: Cookie (Ann-Marie)
Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:58:51 -0700 (PDT)
That sounds reasonable to me, if you think of them in the same way as you would boiling eggs. They 
do contain moisture, and heating them too fast would seem to cause the moisture to want to escape 
fast. If you drop eggs (in the shell) in boiling water, or bring the to the boil too fast, they crack.
  I always get those little divots in my beans, but then, I currently use a cheap little roaster. I don't 
think I have to vary how quickly the temperature goes up.
  On the plus side, I am one step closer to my RK. My husband tried to get me to make chicken on the 
little teeny portable charcoal grill the other night, and I refused, saying, I am a gas griller. He mumble 
something about having to get me a new grill!
   Cookiehttp://cookiestitches.blogspot.com----- Original Message ----
From: Barbara Wilson 
To: homeroast
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2007 7:35:37 AM
Subject: Re: Stovetop roast (was: +Poppery roasts)
I've been pan roasting for about a year now and I am very happy with the 
results. I always pre-heat the beans at the lowest temp on my stove 
until the beans feel warm then I crank it up to almost the highest temp. 
I don't remember where I got the idea to pre-heat the beans, but I did 
read everything I could find on roasting coffee when I first started. 
What do you guys think about pre-heating beans?
Tim Deines wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

8) From: Cookie (Ann-Marie)
I assume those of you who stovetop roast have gas stoves, right? I am stuck=
 with a ceramic cooktop in my house. We didn't have gas in the kitchen when=
 we moved in, and couldn't afford to run the line, so, there you go. With t=
he speed at which my cooktop burners cycle, I would think it would be extre=
mely difficult to maintain any type of consistent even heat.
  Comments?=
  Cookie
 
 http://cookiestitches.blogspot.com----- O=
riginal Message ----
From: Rick Copple 
To: homeroast=
ists.sweetmarias.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2007 12:06:13 PM
Sub=
ject: Re: Stovetop roast (was: +Poppery roasts)
Barbara Wilson wrot=
e:
> I've been pan roasting for about a year now and I am very happy with=
 the 
> results. I always pre-heat the beans at the lowest temp on my sto=
ve 
> until the beans feel warm then I crank it up to almost the highest =
temp. 
> I don't remember where I got the idea to pre-heat the beans, but=
 I did 
> read everything I could find on roasting coffee when I first st=
arted. 
> What do you guys think about pre-heating beans?
> 
That'=
s interesting. First, whatever works for you, do that! :)
I've not pre=
heated the pan before, just turned it on and put the beans 
in, but I don=
't think I've ever started at a lower temp first and then 
went higher. A=
s I think I mentioned recently, my experience has been not 
to slow down =
the ramp to 1st too much unless I'm shooting for a light 
roast. A lot of=
 times on those I'll not preheat the wok, but I've found 
generally that =
I get better flavor out of the beans if I move to first 
crack at a good =
pace (8-12 minutes).
I might try this on some beans I don't mind loosi=
ng. What temp do you 
start with on your stove? Like, warn or a "1"?
=
I've never used the highest setting though, max is half way.
-- 
=
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/=

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
Very interesting, thanks, Cookie.
Brian
On 9/10/07, Cookie (Ann-Marie)  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Barbara Wilson
I don't even understand what you mean by divots. My beans come out all 
beautiful when roasted. I get a melange roast so there is a variety of 
levels of darkness but no divots.
Cookie (Ann-Marie) wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Larry Johnson
Good job, Cookie. I had suspected that, but never done anything to prove it,
other than going from a FreshRoast 8 (a.k.a. "Gone in 6 minutes") to a bread
machine/heat gun. The latter method allows me to warm the beans relatively
slowly for a couple of minutes, then ramp up for about a 15 - 17 minute
total roast time. No divots. Always had divots w/FR8.
On 9/10/07, Cookie (Ann-Marie)  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

12) From: Justin Marquez
"Divots" are little flat pieces that flake off the round back of the beans
if the temperature goes up too quickly in the roaster. They are about 1/16
inch long,  very thin and usually oval-looking in their shape.  So named
because they resemble the divot a golf iron sometimes slices out of the
turf.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/11/07, Barbara Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
I roast using a whirley stove top popcorn popper, the stainless steel
variety.  I thought this was interesting, preheating the beans.  After my
first roast last night, I put the beans I was roasting next into the still
warm popper, then I finished up my notes and putting the roasted beans
away.  I then turned the stove on to my normal heat, I got to first crack
about the same time, but I liked doing it this method better, it seemed much
gentler.
Normally, I preheat the vessel and dump the ambient beans into it, and I
sometimes peak and see the edges of the beans with a burnt look after only a
few moments.  That has always bothered me.  It may have meant I preheated
too high.
Last night I roasted 3 different varieties, but next time, I may roast the
same variety, the first one without preheating the beans, the next one
preheating, and see if I can taste a difference.
As I was thinking about this, I was wondering, does preheating the beans
this way, on "low", in any way bake the beans???
Thank you,
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA
On 9/5/07, Barbara Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brian Kamnetz
Very interesting, Bonnie. I'll be following this thread with great interest.
Brian
On 9/11/07, Bonnie Polkinghorn  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Rick Copple
Cookie (Ann-Marie) wrote:
<Snip>
Mine is electric, but it doesn't cycle. Older style that pretty much 
stays on all the time but runs lower currents through the element the 
lower you put the heat. I can see that a cycling one might present some 
issues, but if it doesn't vary the heat too much, should work. Make sure 
you are using a thick wok/pan that will distribute the heat well, and it 
may require a higher setting on the dial than mine to keep the average 
heat level up to the right temp. Will probably require some test at 
different settings to find what works best.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

16) From: Linda Ferguson
During the better weather here, yes I use a propane burner and a cast iron
dutchoven outside. When I just don't want to roast outside I have an
electric cooktop. The burners do cycle, but I still use the cast iron and
don't seem to have any problems. 
Linda in Lakeside, Oregon
mailto:dasofergie
Cookie (Ann-Marie) wrote:
<Snip>
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.487 / Virus Database: 269.13.22/1013 - Release Date: 9/17/2007
1:29 PM

17) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
OK, so I preheated the beans for the last 2 roasts out of 3, but I was
unable to do any taste comparisons - I still have about 10g each of beans
from those roasts, I may be able to try a taste comparison this evening.
I am liking roasting this way, better.  I know the coffee tastes good and
does not taste baked - not sour at all.  My husband has been commenting on
how much he enjoys the pre-heated bean made coffee.
My husband has the refined taste buds in the family, and he will be a very
good judge.
If we are not able to do this taste comparison, I may roast this way again.
I just wanted to let you know I haven't forgotten about this experiment.  I
just haven't had time, space or equipment to do the test.
It will be a very informal experiment and we will not be cupping.  I'm
thinking grinding , French Pressing one cup, cleaning the FP, then grinding
and FP the next cup.  Hubby and I will try to compare.
-Bonnie
On 9/11/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
Replying to myself here,
first, thanks to Barbara for mentioning that she preheats her beans when she
pan roasts.
I use the whirley stove top popcorn popper, and I decided to preheat my
beans.  I like my results much better this way, YMMV.
I did 2 batches of the same bean, the Peru Organic WP Decaf.  First batch, I
did not preheat the beans.  The second batch I did.  I roast about 8 oz at a
time, get to First Crack at about 8 minutes, this one I roasted to C+.
I had 22g of each bean left at the end of the week.
I boiled some water.  Took the water off the heat.  Ground the first batch
o' beans.  Put into French Press.  Poured in 16 oz of the slightly cooled
water.  Pressed at 4 min.  Poured into a cup.
Put the water back to boil.  Cleaned the FP (no soap).  Took the water off
the heat, ground the second batch, etc.
I put the FP on the scale with the grounds, zero 'd it, then added the 16 oz
of water.  I was aiming for 15 oz, but over filled a small bit, you can't go
back!
Even though the first cup was about 5 minutes cooler than the second, it
seemed like a fair test.
I can say that the beans that were preheated had a smoother taste and feel.
The ones that were not had a bit more acidic taste and a bite that hurt the
back of my throat, almost like more tannins in wine.  My husband - who has
much better taste descriptions than I do - agreed.
I think I will continue to preheat my beans when using this roasting method.
Hope I didn't bore anyone with this report!!
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA

19) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
So, I'm talking to myself again,
I just read Les's report on his roasting temps in the RK Drum, and that got
me thinking of my own temps.
On my little stove top popcorn popper, my little thermometer gets to 1st
crack at about 280 degrees.  I was heating the popper up to 350-400 or more
(on my thermometer).
If 1st crack happens at an internal bean temp. of about 356 degrees, and my
thermometer shows 280 degrees, I was heating the vessel up to over 350 on my
thermometer, what is the real temp of my initial starting point?  I'll tell
you - it was too hot.
So, maybe instead of preheating my beans, I just need to preheat my vessel
to a lower temp.
If Les preheats to 550 and 1st crack happens at 480, that is 87%, If my 1st
crack happens at 280, maybe I should preheat to 320.
I worry about baking my beans if I preheat them, which is why I am pondering
this so much.
So much to try and to learn.
Thanks for letting me ponder "out loud".
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA

20) From: gin
Bonnie:
ahh, caught up in the pre heat issue.
I say forget pre heat for a bit especially if you are using a stove top popper. The material of your popper, the manner of heat (electric/gas) cannot relate to the RK Drum in any fashion Bonnie.
Every bean is way different depending on how it is/was processed so temp is not relative between your popper and the RK regardless of internal bean temp.
I would toss those beans in the popper, turn up the heat without burning down the house and see what happens.
hold um above the heat to control temp and enjoy.
ginny
---- Bonnie Polkinghorn  wrote: 
<Snip>

21) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
Thanks Ginny,
You would suggest throwing the beans in, then turning up the heat, not
preheating the beans or the popper.  Hmm, yet another thing for me to try.
Always fascinating.
I'm not really being obsessive here, I just want to get the best possibe
roast with the equipment I have.  At this point, it seems similar to dialing
in the proper grind or toying with grind and extraction time in a French
Press.  I'm very happy with my results, I'm just trying to get them to the
best they can be.
-Bonnie
On 9/26/07, gin  wrote:
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22) From:
Funny this should come up- based on the stove top info I read a month ago, I've changed how I run my popper.  I turn it up full heat for 30 seconds, then turn off the fan & heater, let it sit for 90 seconds, then proceed like I always have.  I had a problem with the insides not being as roasted as the outside.  It seems to be better now, and have a little better flavor-also I've started turning up the heat when 1st crack starts (lower fan & keep heater on for longer time before cylcing off).  I am getting much better coffee now.  I was unknowningly stalling my roast before and getting flat, disappointing flavor.
---- Bonnie Polkinghorn  wrote: 
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