HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 1st roast with IR2 (8 msgs / 334 lines)
1) From: Robert Gulley
Hi folks.
Just thought I would share with you my first-ever roast, using the 
IR2 that I received yesterday and the sampler from SM. I know most of 
you are old hands at roasting, but maybe this will bring back a fond 
memory or two.
I loaded the machine with 2 scoops of Costa Rica Naranjo Caracol 
Peaberry, and selected the preset roast #2. Held my breath as I 
double checked the secureness of the chamber and chaff collector, and 
pressed "roast." Pulled a chair up and watched as the beans slowly 
started moving around. After a few moments the fan increased and the 
beans started dancing around like they knew what was coming - the 
fulfillment of their single purpose in life (well, okay, some should 
make more coffee trees I guess!)
I watched in fascination as the green beans began to turn shades of 
yellow, then golden, then hints of brown. There it was . . . first 
crack . . . no longer just a myth, a fable, a word whispered by the 
"old ones" . . .
Dancing jubilantly the beans grew darker and darker, their rich aroma 
filling my kitchen with promises of great coffee to come.
I let the roast continue a little longer than I might have, just to 
see "what would happen," and stopped it somewhere between Vienna and 
French Roast, the beans reflecting a slight sheen on their surface. 
Cooling down, they eventually came to rest, and poured into the 
colander, gentle stirred until their last heat was spent.
  Silently they sat, awaiting the coming dawn and the fulfillment of 
their purpose, their meaning, their total sacrifice of joy - the 
morning cup of joe. Fantastic, even for a beginner like me, armed 
only with beginner's luck and a good roaster, the flavor only a 
promise of better days to come.
Forgive the long and poetic post, oh you guru's of the roast; but as 
you can tell - I'm hooked!
Regards,
Robert G.

2) From: Eddie Dove
Forgive?  No.
We invite, welcome and enjoy the poetic post depicting one's ventures into
the realms of home coffee roasting.
Welcome aboard, Robert and thank you for sharing!
Stephen should be along in a bit to welcome you; he just started roasting in
an I-Roast2 as well.
You must now light the candle for someone else ...
Again, welcome.
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 9/5/07, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all> wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Larry Johnson
Welcome, Robert, to this fascinating hobby/obsession. There are so many ways
to "tinker" with coffee beans: roasting equipment, roasting times/temps,
resting procedures, brewing methods, and even (gasp!) whether or not to use
cream and/or sugar. You're sure to have a ball, just like most of the rest
of us.
And the poetic posts that illuminate the ecstasy of some
coffee-related experience are my favorite ones. Well, my favorites after
the discussions about OT posts, that is.
On 9/5/07, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

4) From: Stephen Carey
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Eddie was correct, Robert, here I am.  I love the IR2 and the way you 
described your first roast.  I only have 25 roasts, had a heck of a 
good roast last night.  I roasted the same bean you did on my second 
roast, I believe, I am not near my logs right now.
I think you can really enjoy the IR2.  Sure, one day you may outgrow 
it, but give it a good chance.  My mother and I were playing with the 
variables that one can do with this machine, from temperature, to how 
many cycles, to how many beans from SMs, and a few other things.  We 
hit 147,000,000.  Then toss in going outside and dealing with the 
variables of humidity and temperature and it skyrockets, then add in 
blends and it goes well into the billions.  Now, they are not all 
feasible or do they make sense, but it shows that the machine can 
keep you busy for a while.  I love playing with it a bit, even at my stage.
Found my logs, the Guatemala Chimeltenango - San Jose Ocano, is 
wonderful, even after 18 hours rest - I couldn't wait for 24 
hours.  I love the chocolate taste that moves slowly over the tongue 
and to the brain.  It is amazing.  It starts out with a kind of 
flower flavor, then the chocolate.  I don't taste, but a very slight 
hint, of the grape.  I hope it comes out stronger after resting.  I 
took the bean to City, I would like to try it at City+ and at Full 
City, all of which Tom says are very good.
I was wrong, the bean you roasted I didn't get to until roasts 16 through 19.
Enjoy it, truly enjoy it.  Don't let stress get in the way, which I 
have done a few times.  Almost whatever you turn out will be pretty 
good or great.  It will beat a can almost any day.
Finally, post here, chime in, and ask for help.  I have never been a 
party to such wonderful people as you will find her, like Eddie, Ken, 
Les and many many more.
I will be posting later about a roast I had that I hit spot on and I 
just don't like it, others love it, thinking it is my best roast, but 
I can't stand it.  It shows that we can roast coffees we would not 
normally be exposed to.  For, I will roast the coffee I don't like 
again for those that love it.  Actually, I liked it before it fully 
rested, weird.
Have a great time,
Stephen
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Eddie was correct, Robert, here I am.  I love the IR2
and the way you described your first roast.  I only have 25 roasts,
had a heck of a good roast last night.  I roasted the same bean you
did on my second roast, I believe, I am not near my logs right
now.
I think you can really enjoy the IR2.  Sure, one day you may outgrow
it, but give it a good chance.  My mother and I were playing with
the variables that one can do with this machine, from temperature, to how
many cycles, to how many beans from SMs, and a few other things.  We
hit 147,000,000.  Then toss in going outside and dealing with the
variables of humidity and temperature and it skyrockets, then add in
blends and it goes well into the billions.  Now, they are not all
feasible or do they make sense, but it shows that the machine can keep
you busy for a while.  I love playing with it a bit, even at my
stage.
Found my logs, the Guatemala Chimeltenango - San Jose Ocano, is
wonderful, even after 18 hours rest - I couldn't wait for 24 hours. 
I love the chocolate taste that moves slowly over the tongue and to the
brain.  It is amazing.  It starts out with a kind of flower
flavor, then the chocolate.  I don't taste, but a very slight hint,
of the grape.  I hope it comes out stronger after resting.  I
took the bean to City, I would like to try it at City+ and at Full City,
all of which Tom says are very good.
I was wrong, the bean you roasted I didn't get to until roasts 16 through
19.
Enjoy it, truly enjoy it.  Don't let stress get in the way, which I
have done a few times.  Almost whatever you turn out will be pretty
good or great.  It will beat a can almost any day.
Finally, post here, chime in, and ask for help.  I have never been a
party to such wonderful people as you will find her, like Eddie, Ken, Les
and many many more.
I will be posting later about a roast I had that I hit spot on and I just
don't like it, others love it, thinking it is my best roast, but I can't
stand it.  It shows that we can roast coffees we would not normally
be exposed to.  For, I will roast the coffee I don't like again for
those that love it.  Actually, I liked it before it fully rested,
weird.
Have a great time,
Stephen
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5) From: Stephen Carey
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Eddie was correct, Robert, here I am.  I love the IR2 and the way you 
described your first roast.  I only have 25 roasts, had a heck of a 
good roast last night.  I roasted the same bean you did on my second 
roast, I believe, I am not near my logs right now.
I think you can really enjoy the IR2.  Sure, one day you may outgrow 
it, but give it a good chance.  My mother and I were playing with the 
variables that one can do with this machine, from temperature, to how 
many cycles, to how many beans from SMs, and a few other things.  We 
hit 147,000,000.  Then toss in going outside and dealing with the 
variables of humidity and temperature and it skyrockets, then add in 
blends and it goes well into the billions.  Now, they are not all 
feasible or do they make sense, but it shows that the machine can 
keep you busy for a while.  I love playing with it a bit, even at my stage.
Found my logs, the Guatemala Chimeltenango - San Jose Ocano, is 
wonderful, even after 18 hours rest - I couldn't wait for 24 
hours.  I love the chocolate taste that moves slowly over the tongue 
and to the brain.  It is amazing.  It starts out with a kind of 
flower flavor, then the chocolate.  I don't taste, but a very slight 
hint, of the grape.  I hope it comes out stronger after resting.  I 
took the bean to City, I would like to try it at City+ and at Full 
City, all of which Tom says are very good.
I was wrong, the bean you roasted I didn't get to until roasts 16 through 19.
Enjoy it, truly enjoy it.  Don't let stress get in the way, which I 
have done a few times.  Almost whatever you turn out will be pretty 
good or great.  It will beat a can almost any day.
Finally, post here, chime in, and ask for help.  I have never been a 
party to such wonderful people as you will find her, like Eddie, Ken, 
Les and many many more.
I will be posting later about a roast I had that I hit spot on and I 
just don't like it, others love it, thinking it is my best roast, but 
I can't stand it.  It shows that we can roast coffees we would not 
normally be exposed to.  For, I will roast the coffee I don't like 
again for those that love it.  Actually, I liked it before it fully 
rested, weird.
Have a great time,
Stephen
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Eddie was correct, Robert, here I am.  I love the IR2
and the way you described your first roast.  I only have 25 roasts,
had a heck of a good roast last night.  I roasted the same bean you
did on my second roast, I believe, I am not near my logs right
now.
I think you can really enjoy the IR2.  Sure, one day you may outgrow
it, but give it a good chance.  My mother and I were playing with
the variables that one can do with this machine, from temperature, to how
many cycles, to how many beans from SMs, and a few other things.  We
hit 147,000,000.  Then toss in going outside and dealing with the
variables of humidity and temperature and it skyrockets, then add in
blends and it goes well into the billions.  Now, they are not all
feasible or do they make sense, but it shows that the machine can keep
you busy for a while.  I love playing with it a bit, even at my
stage.
Found my logs, the Guatemala Chimeltenango - San Jose Ocano, is
wonderful, even after 18 hours rest - I couldn't wait for 24 hours. 
I love the chocolate taste that moves slowly over the tongue and to the
brain.  It is amazing.  It starts out with a kind of flower
flavor, then the chocolate.  I don't taste, but a very slight hint,
of the grape.  I hope it comes out stronger after resting.  I
took the bean to City, I would like to try it at City+ and at Full City,
all of which Tom says are very good.
I was wrong, the bean you roasted I didn't get to until roasts 16 through
19.
Enjoy it, truly enjoy it.  Don't let stress get in the way, which I
have done a few times.  Almost whatever you turn out will be pretty
good or great.  It will beat a can almost any day.
Finally, post here, chime in, and ask for help.  I have never been a
party to such wonderful people as you will find her, like Eddie, Ken, Les
and many many more.
I will be posting later about a roast I had that I hit spot on and I just
don't like it, others love it, thinking it is my best roast, but I can't
stand it.  It shows that we can roast coffees we would not normally
be exposed to.  For, I will roast the coffee I don't like again for
those that love it.  Actually, I liked it before it fully rested,
weird.
Have a great time,
Stephen
--=====================_171544140==.ALT--

6) From: Robert Gulley
Eddie, Stephen, and Larry
Thank you for the kind comments and forbearance - I have been like a 
kid waiting for Christmas as I awaited my roaster. The experience was 
akin to my first woodturning - simple joy in the process, far more 
than the results merited. Like working with wood, I am going to enjoy 
the subtleties and nuances of discovery, each roast being a new 
experience, a new challenge. I will definitely post my progress along 
the way, and look forward to learning from this group as I go along. 
Thanks to Tom's musings on the IR2 I know I made the right choice for 
my needs and my experience level. I imagine this machine will wear 
out long before I exhaust its potential.
By the way, I have read some reviews that said they had a hard time 
distinguishing first crack - in my machine at least, it was not hard 
to hear at all. Maybe newer ones are quieter? Love being able to 
watch the whole process through the window!
First cup was after 15 hours, quite good; 2nd tasting after 21 hours, 
even better!
Regards, all -
Robert
At 10:36 AM 9/5/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
congratulations Roger, even if the roast would have been a bust, your =
ways with words telling us about was great. As I was reading it, a smile =
came across my face as I remembered the old classic movie "The Christmas =
Story"
When Ralphie was describing the Daisy Red Rider BB rifle.
Thanks for the post and I hope the coffee lives up to the story because =
it was great.
RK

8) From: Dave & Beth
"I watched in fascination as the green beans began to turn shades of yellow,
then golden, then hints of brown. There it was . . . first crack . . . no
longer just a myth, a fable, a word whispered by the "old ones" . . .
Dancing jubilantly the beans grew darker and darker, their rich aroma
filling my kitchen with promises of great coffee to come."
Now THAT's a great read!  Your passion shows.  Enjoy!!!


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