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Topic: roasting in an electrical oven have anybody tried? (11 msgs / 303 lines)
1) From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Claus_Th=F8gersen?=
Hi,
I roast coffee for a few people like many here on the list.  One of them 
wants to start experimenting with roasting beans on his own.
Normally if I had lived in the US the way to go is obvious, get your hands 
on a used popper. The problem is that I live in Denmark and we do not have 
cheap poppers available like in the US. So I have to recommend other 
methods.
The simplest way must be either to roast in a vok or pan or something 
similar, or to roast in the standard electrical oven.
I did try roasting in a Pan a while back and it did not go well at all. I do 
not think that I ever had enough heat to succeed, so I cannot really say 
anything good about this method.
Oven roasting then could be the way to go, the problem here is Toms warning 
against roasting in an electrical oven, wich is the normal ovens people use 
here.
It should be noted that ovens here run on either 240 volt 2 phase or 
something close to 300 vvolt 3 phase power, and either 10 amp fuse or 15 amp 
fuse, so this could make the case for oven roasting better.
Anyway have others here tried oven roasting, and if yes did it work at all?
Claus Thøgersen

2) From: Randall Nortman
On Thu, Sep 06, 2007 at 01:46:16PM +0200, Claus Thøgersen wrote:
[...]
<Snip>
I haven't actually tried it, as I've been happy with my popper, but
I've thought about doing it in my electric oven.  I have a large
baking stone for baking bread and pizza, and I think that might make
all the difference in terms of even heat distribution.  I have found
that with that in my oven the heat is very even without any hot spots.
It is still a little warmer at the back of the oven than in the front,
so you might have to rotate the pan once toward the end.
You don't need a "real" baking stone to make this work.  Unglazed
floor tiles (called "quarry tiles" here in the States) would also
work.  Line the lower oven rack with them, leaving small gaps for air
circulation, and then put the roasting pan either directly onto the
tiles or on the rack above them.  You might find that this improves
baking in general, and I suspect it makes an electric oven just as
good as gas for purposes of coffee roasting.
If you try it, let us know how it goes!  Make sure you're prepared to
deal with any smoke that's produced, though.  Open the windows and/or
run an exhaust fan.
-- 
Randall

3) From: Rick Copple
Claus Thøgersen wrote:
<Snip>
With pan roasting, one should generally expect their first tries at it 
will fail. There are several variables which need to be in place (good 
pan, thick, with good even heat distribution being one) for it to work, 
and you have to give yourself a chance to know your stove. I can tell 
you what works for me, and that might give you a baseline to experiment 
with, but what is medium on mine might be medium high on yours, or 
lower. Consquently, you have to get to know how your particular stove 
will respond and what exact settings work the best.
Generally, not the best route to start out a newbie on, I would agree. 
For immediate gratification, using something like an air popper is hard 
to beat. I did my first roast with one of those and it came out so good 
I couldn't believe it, and I was hooked.
So if you are going to use that method, get some Ug coffee from Tom, and 
experiment with it until you have a good feel for how to get to 
different levels of roast. And make it clear to anyone who has never 
done it before, that they are going to not do well with it the first 
time or two until they get a feel for what works.
The positive side of pan/wok roasting, is the newbie gets to experience 
the full process of the roast. Aside from fan noise, its one of the 
quietest methods so you can easily hear the first and second cracks. And 
you get to watch as the beans gradually turn color.
Another possible method that might be a little easier is the heat 
gun/dog bowl method. I've not used it before, but many do and it might 
be easier to get a good roast on the first attempt with it.
<Snip>
I've never tried it, though I thought at some point I would. But I have 
an electric over too, which is probably one reason. It would be 
interesting to hear from someone who has used that before.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

4) From: raymanowen
"...have others here tried oven roasting..."
That was going to be the heat source for my RK Drum, with the rotisserie
drive motor on one side and the shaft through the middle, from side to side=
.
They're insulated, so the gearmotor wouldn't get hot.
If I became the big roaster, I could do all the successive roasts I wanted.
When we first remodeled the kitchen, I knew I should not have allowed the
electric ovens to be junked. I guess I was really off my rocker for  a
while  after I got my bells rung. The Corvair was dead, not I.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Takes a lickin and keeps on tickin'-
On 9/6/07, Claus Thøgersen  wrote:
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
e
<Snip>

5) From: Larry Williams
I have been looking for a way to roast larger batches and the electric 
oven with the RKor other  drum may be the answer.  A used oven in the 
garage with a couple of holes punched in the sides - a BBQ motor mounted 
on the outside and a roasting drum inside.  A relatively inexpensive 
setup.  Add a temp probe and I'm ready to go.
I like my IR2 but it takes too long for multiple batches. 
Great idea....
Larry Williams
Everyday is a Saturday!
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
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6) From: Aaron Scholten
I roast in a toaster oven I converted into a coffe roaster.  I can do 
about a pound at a time with it.
one thing you need to be careful of is that you can get sufficient heat 
to the beans in a fairly short time.
in other words, if you can't get them hot enough fast enough, you will 
end up cooking the beans more than roasting them, and they can go to the 
'burnt' stage without really cracking properly.
Id say if you don't reach first crack in about 15 minutes or so you will 
have problems and need to either boost the heat, or lower the amount of 
beans cooking per shot.
aaron

7) From: MichaelB
Do you stir the beans? If so, how? If not, how do you keep the beans
roasting evenly?
On 9/6/07, Aaron Scholten  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

8) From: Aaron Scholten
It's a rotisserie oven, I made a drum and use it that way,  It does 
probably about 4 to 6 rpm or so and keeps the beans stirred by the 
rotating motion of the drum.   I put a little kicker in there to catch 
the beans and make them tumble after being picked up the side of the can 
a bit so they don't just slide as it turns.
aaron
MichaelB wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Rich
The only problem that you will have when using an elec=
tric oven for roasting is that you will have to 
run both elements simultainiously to get the BTU input t=
hat you will need.  The problem will come 
from the high level of radiant energy from these two e=
lements.  The majority of the energy input to 
the oven is in the form of radiant energy.  A gas =
oven with a big burner would work very well.  look f=
or 
a used commercial range.  You can find them for under =
$100.00 with very little effort and if you dig, 
even less.
On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 16:07:46 -0700, Larry Williams wrote=
:
<Snip>
 and the electric 
<Snip>
A used oven in the 
<Snip>
a BBQ motor mounted 
<Snip>
ely inexpensive 
<Snip>
<Snip>
tches. 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Drum, with the 
<Snip>
rough the middle, 
<Snip>
r wouldn't get hot.
<Snip>
successive roasts I 
<Snip>
I should not have 
<Snip>
was really off my 
<Snip>
 The Corvair was dead, 
<Snip>
 here on the list.  One
<Snip>
ans on his own.
<Snip>
ay to go is obvious, get
<Snip>
live in Denmark and we do
<Snip>
I have to recommend other
<Snip>
in a vok or pan or something
<Snip>
ical oven.
<Snip>
k and it did not go well at
<Snip>
succeed, so I cannot
<Snip>
, the problem here is
<Snip>
is the normal ovens
<Snip>
 either 240 volt 2 phase or
<Snip>
 and either 10 amp fuse
<Snip>
n roasting better.
<Snip>
and if yes did it
<Snip>
 options, vacations,
<Snip>
<Snip>
---
<Snip>
se Date: 9/6/2007 8:36 AM
<Snip>
<Snip>
Date: 9/6/2007 8:36 AM
<Snip>
cations, unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

10) From: Homeroaster
Pictures?

11) From: Cookie (Ann-Marie)
That is exactly how my friend from Guatemala says her mother used to do it.=
 She says her mother's kitchen always smelled like roasting coffee and baki=
ng bread.
  Cookie
 
 http://cookiestitches.blogspot.com=
----- Original Message ----
From: Randall Nortman 
To: homeroast
Sent: Thursday, September 6=
, 2007 7:11:46 AM
Subject: Re: +roasting in an electrical oven have anybo=
dy tried?
On Thu, Sep 06, 2007 at 01:46:16PM +0200, Claus Thøgers=
en wrote:
[...]
> Anyway have others here tried oven roasting, and if y=
es did it work at all?
You don't need a "real" baking stone to make=
 this work.  Unglazed
floor tiles (called "quarry tiles" here in the Stat=
es) would also
work.  Line the lower oven rack with them, leaving small g=
aps for air
circulation, and then put the roasting pan either directly on=
to the
tiles or on the rack above them.  You might find that this improve=
s
baking in general, and I suspect it makes an electric oven just as
go=
od as gas for purposes of coffee roasting.
If you try it, let us know =
how it goes!  Make sure you're prepared to
deal with any smoke that's pro=
duced, though.  Open the windows and/or
run an exhaust fan.
-- 
Ra=
ndall
homeroast mailing=
 listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change=
 your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go t=
ohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings


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