HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee in Kenya (6 msgs / 291 lines)
1) From: Frank Parth
I was following a thread on the earthquake in Indonesia and ended up at one point at The Guardian newspaper in Kenya.
Another headline was Nairobi cafes buzzing as real coffee finally comes home
athttp://www.guardian.co.uk/kenya/story/0,,2140850,00.htmlThe first two paragraphs are:
Time was, not so long ago, that if you wanted to buy a cup of quality Kenyan coffee your bestbet was a coffee shop in 
the US or Europe. In Nairobi, where coffee bushes grow wild in the suburbs, people wanting a shot of caffeine made do 
with instant granules from a tin.
No more. Plush coffee bars are springing up all over the capital, serving home-grown lattes and cappuccinos to young, 
status-driven Kenyans breaking from the country's tea-drinking past. Where there were no proper coffee shops in 1999, 
there are now more than 20. In the gritty city centre alone, Java House, the best-known chain, serves 1,500 cups of 
premium coffee a day.
and then it goes on to talk about the coffee grown there.
Do I get a little anal about following threads? Maybe. But I'm sure that's because I'm a Virgo (August 26).
Frank Parth

2) From: Scott Morford
Hello all! This is my first post to the listserv. Been roasting at
home for about 8 months now, getting the basics down, trying coffees
from all over,  and loving it. Anyway...
I spent about 6 months in Kenya about 3 or 4 years ago, and I have to
say that the Java House is what I looked forward to most on our
monthly trip into Nairobi for supplies. I don't know if the coffee at
the shop was really that good or it was just such an improvement over
what I was straining through toliet paper at that time, but it was
definitely Java House that put me on the path towards coffee
enlightnment.
I'm suprised the chain has taken off as much as it claims in the
article. When I was there I think there were maybe two or three
stores, all hidden away in expatriot enclaves. You'd walk into the
store and it would be like walking into coffee shop in any large
american city, with 80% of the customers being white.
I'm still nostalgic for that cup, and ever since I compare batch of
Kenya beans I roast to it... searching for that Nirvana.
Scott.
On 9/12/07, Frank Parth  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Stephen Carey
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Welcome to our list.   Drop in often.  I promise this group is a nice 
as they come, the brightest to be found and truly willing to 
help.  That has been my experience of the past two months, when I 
first started roasting.
At 11:27 AM 9/13/2007, you wrote:
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Welcome to our list.   Drop in often.  I
promise this group is a nice as they come, the brightest to be found and
truly willing to help.  That has been my experience of the past two
months, when I first started roasting.
At 11:27 AM 9/13/2007, you wrote:
Hello all! This is my first post
to the listserv. Been roasting at
home for about 8 months now, getting the basics down, trying coffees
from all over,  and loving it. Anyway...
I spent about 6 months in Kenya about 3 or 4 years ago, and I have
to
say that the Java House is what I looked forward to most on our
monthly trip into Nairobi for supplies. I don't know if the coffee
at
the shop was really that good or it was just such an improvement
over
what I was straining through toliet paper at that time, but it was
definitely Java House that put me on the path towards coffee
enlightnment.
I'm suprised the chain has taken off as much as it claims in the
article. When I was there I think there were maybe two or three
stores, all hidden away in expatriot enclaves. You'd walk into the
store and it would be like walking into coffee shop in any large
american city, with 80% of the customers being white.
I'm still nostalgic for that cup, and ever since I compare batch of
Kenya beans I roast to it... searching for that Nirvana.
Scott.
On 9/12/07, Frank Parth <fparth> wrote:
> I was following a thread on the earthquake in Indonesia and ended up
at one point at The Guardian newspaper in Kenya.
>
> Another headline was Nairobi cafes buzzing as real coffee finally
comes home
>
> at
http://www.guardian.co.uk/kenya/story/0,,2140850,00.html>
>
> The first two paragraphs are:
>
> Time was, not so long ago, that if you wanted to buy a cup of
quality Kenyan coffee your bestbet was a coffee shop in
> the US or Europe. In Nairobi, where coffee bushes grow wild in the
suburbs, people wanting a shot of caffeine made do
> with instant granules from a tin.
>
> No more. Plush coffee bars are springing up all over the capital,
serving home-grown lattes and cappuccinos to young,
> status-driven Kenyans breaking from the country's tea-drinking past.
Where there were no proper coffee shops in 1999,
> there are now more than 20. In the gritty city centre alone, Java
House, the best-known chain, serves 1,500 cups of
> premium coffee a day.
>
> and then it goes on to talk about the coffee grown there.
>
> Do I get a little anal about following threads? Maybe. But I'm sure
that's because I'm a Virgo (August 26).
>
> Frank Parth
>
> homeroast mailing list
>
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unsvbscribes) go to
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homeroast mailing list
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4) From: Robert Gulley
Welcome, Scott
What a neat story - I am envious of all the people here who have 
gotten to experience some of these places first-hand. My only 
"out-of-country" coffee experience was in the West Bank drinking 
turkish coffee the way they do there.
What is your favorite coffee to roast so far? I just received a Kenya 
Peaberry today and looking forward to trying it.
RG
At 11:27 AM 9/13/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Robert Joslin
Scott
     Welcome to THE list.  Its always interesting to hear (or read) about
peoples coffee experiences.....particularly in other parts of the world.
Happy roasting!   Josh
On 9/13/07, Scott Morford  wrote:
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6) From: Gail Shuford
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Yes, Scott  I second that - welcome to the list.  I don't put my two  
cents in very much but I periodically check out the list to see what  
my brethren in the bean are up to.  I've been roasting since May of  
this year so I am newer at it than you but I feel like I have come a  
long ways since I discovered poppery roasting.   Im still doing  
poppery with great success and so far my absolute favorite is the  
Kenyas.  I have quite an assortment of SM greens now so I've been  
sitting back in roasting and brewing heaven.  Good to hear from U.
Gail
On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:00 PM, Robert Joslin wrote:
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Yes, Scott  I second that - =
welcome to the list.  I don't put my two cents in very much but I =
periodically check out the list to see what my brethren in the bean are =
up to.  I've been roasting since May of this year so I am newer at it =
than you but I feel like I have come a long ways since I discovered =
poppery roasting.   Im still doing poppery with great success and so =
far my absolute favorite is the Kenyas.  I have quite an assortment of =
SM greens now so I've been sitting back in roasting and brewing heaven. =
 Good to hear from U.Gail
On Sep 13, 2007, =
at 5:00 PM, Robert Joslin wrote:
Scott      Welcome = to THE list.  Its always interesting to hear (or read) about peoples = coffee experiences.....particularly in other parts of the world.  = Happy roasting!   Josh   On 9/13/07, Scott = Morford <smorford> = wrote: Hello all! = This is my first post to the listserv. Been roasting at home for = about 8 months now, getting the basics down, trying coffees from all = over,  and loving it. Anyway... I spent about 6 months in = Kenya about 3 or 4 years ago, and I have to say that the Java House = is what I looked forward to most on our monthly trip into Nairobi for = supplies. I don't know if the coffee at the shop was really that = good or it was just such an improvement over what I was straining = through toliet paper at that time, but it was definitely Java House = that put me on the path towards coffee enlightnment. I'm = suprised the chain has taken off as much as it claims in the article. = When I was there I think there were maybe two or three stores, all = hidden away in expatriot enclaves. You'd walk into the store and it = would be like walking into coffee shop in any large american city, = with 80% of the customers being white. I'm still nostalgic for = that cup, and ever since I compare batch of Kenya beans I roast to = it... searching for that Nirvana. Scott. On 9/12/07, = Frank Parth <fparth> = wrote: > I was following a thread on the earthquake in Indonesia = and ended up at one point at The Guardian newspaper in Kenya. = > > Another headline was Nairobi cafes buzzing as real = coffee finally comes home > > at http://w=ww.guardian.co.uk/kenya/story/0,,2140850,00.html = > > > The first two paragraphs = are: > > Time was, not so long ago, that if you wanted to = buy a cup of quality Kenyan coffee your bestbet was a coffee shop = in > the US or Europe. In Nairobi, where coffee bushes grow wild = in the suburbs, people wanting a shot of caffeine made do > with = instant granules from a tin. > > No more. Plush coffee bars = are springing up all over the capital, serving home-grown lattes and = cappuccinos to young, > status-driven Kenyans breaking from the = country's tea-drinking past. Where there were no proper coffee shops in = 1999, > there are now more than 20. In the gritty city centre = alone, Java House, the best-known chain, serves 1,500 cups of > = premium coffee a day. > > and then it goes on to talk about = the coffee grown there. > > Do I get a little anal about = following threads? Maybe. But I'm sure that's because I'm a Virgo = (August 26). > > Frank Parth > = > homeroast = mailing list > http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast > To change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings >= homeroast mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-1-972413314--


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