HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: SM Blog, was - Re: +sour v. fruity (2 msgs / 113 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
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I love the blog and only today did I ever leave a response and write 
about it at my place www.stephencarey.com.  I put a link to it.  I 
think you do a tremendous job of sharing your experiences and manage 
to leave the reader with a close feeling to what you are writing 
about, sometimes to the point of tasting the coffee.
Stephen.
At 01:28 PM 9/13/2007, you wrote:
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I love the blog and only today did I ever leave a response
and write about it at my place

www.stephencarey.com.  I put a link to it.  I think you do
a tremendous job of sharing your experiences and manage to leave the
reader with a close feeling to what you are writing about, sometimes to
the point of tasting the coffee.
Stephen.
At 01:28 PM 9/13/2007, you wrote:
great responses to this post.
great topic! i think it's been covered well and maybe i can just add a
couple footnotes:
among some cuppers, there's a distinction being made between fruity and
fruited. it's sort of an arbitrary use of the two terms but there is the
need to distinguish in some way the positive fruited notes versus the
processing defect of fruity coffee. so fruity is being used to mean
pulpy, fermenty fruit, perhaps vinegar-like notes that exceed
"winey" flavors. this can be from coffee cherry that is far too
ripe, it might be from  cherry that isn't pulped/washed or dried
promptly, it might be from unclean water when the coffee is run down the
washing channels after fermentation, or improper raking/drying, or
perhaps bad use of the aquapulper in the case of pulp natural coffees. In
any case, it is a dirty fruit flavor. Many dry process coffees have
flavors that push the limit of fruited and are nearly fruity (or perhaps
truly are fruity) but we accept them for this style of cup.
fruited is being used to distinguish clean fruit notes that would, as
someone indicated, would come from particular positive chlorogenic acids
(CGAs). they can also come from esters and other compounds.
to some degree, fanatics of this distinction would think of fruity as
ALWAYS being bad, and fruited as positive. i refer to people in the
"clean cup" camp, with george howell being the representative
there (people i fully respect but don't agree with completely - i endorse
dry process and think fruity flavors have their place.)
now, to the original question, (and as people indicated) sour and fruity
are not really in opposition to eachother. Some people would find Kenya
Karatina a sour fruit coffee, because it is citric. then again, sour
fruity as a negative reminds me of tight, astringent notes, like white
vinegar, and that would definitely be processing defect.
tom
btw: i am just curious if people read the weblog for new announcements,
or use the rss feature there? i don't get many comments to posts, maybe
because i havent been using it enough to post anything thought-provoking
... mainly using it for new coffee announcements. but i am working on a
bunch of things to try to improve the "interactiveness" of the
site in general. between watching ben ... getting time to surf / sail
dinghys (my latest obsession) and trips! anyway, for now i would comments
and feedback on the weblog.
--
                 
"Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
           Sweet
Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                     
http://www.sweetmarias.com              
Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
    Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA
94607 - USA
           
phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com
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2) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
I subscribe to the RSS feed.  I'm no expert, but I click a button on my
browser and my RSS feed links appear.  I can then hover my cursor over each
one, and it tells me if there is anything new.
If there is something new, I click on the link and I'm there.
I like seeing when the new coffees appear.  I appreciate it.  Thanks,
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA


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