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Topic: Greetings from Hilo (8 msgs / 349 lines)
1) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
OH I AM SO JELIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2) From: Lisa Carton
WOW---hi Chris!!! What a great post! Thanks and WELCOME!
What a terrific =
thing you have going there!!! Awesome..........I am sure you will get a lot=
 of great feedback and help from this list----a great bunch of people here =
for sure!
That is so cool that you "happened" upon the old coffee growing=
 there! (Nothing is really a coincidence.....)  Sounds like you have a terr=
ific project on your hands (ooooh,......bad pun alert.........)
I would L=
OVE to see pics!!!!!
~Lisa
 
~~~~> Come see my Coffee Blog at  http:/=
/lisabeeen.blogspot.com    
----- Original Message ----
From: =
Chris Hardenbrook 
To: homeroast=
s.com
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2007 5:12:58 PM
Subject: +Greetings f=
rom Hilo
G'morning to all (yes, it's still morning here in the Hawaiia=
n Islands)!
I am new to the list and thought I'd drop a little note to=
 introduce myself.  My wife, Leslie, and I moved to the Big Island in Feb f=
rom Redondo Beach in CA.  I was offered a job here by the Center for Enviro=
nmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML), which is run by Colorado Stat=
e University to ensure the sustainability of Mother Earth to support milita=
ry training activities at Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA).  I am not military=
 myself, just happy to help our Mother sustain the various indignities we h=
umans inflict upon her.  I am a cartographer (in modern parlance: a Geograp=
hic Information System (GIS) specialist) and am mapping the habitat for Thr=
eatened and Endangered species and archaeologically sensitive areas so troo=
ps will keep their boots away from them.
Since work is the top center =
of the Island at 6,500 ft, and there is nowhere within 45 minutes drive of =
the Base to live, we have a choice of living on the Kona side or the Hilo s=
ide.  I choose the wet side, Hilo, for its funky ambiance and that it boast=
s the lowest cost-of-living index in the State, and therefore, was affordab=
le to buy a home.  The big bonus was finding that just over our back fence,=
 which is undeveloped jungle (is that redundant??), is an abandoned coffee =
patch!  It was probably planted 30 - 50 years ago judging by the stump diam=
eters.  At one time it was no doubt a well-cleared area with the coffee tre=
es deliberately and knowledgeably maintained and pruned.  Now, it has been =
neglected for a decade, at least.  The vines and guava have moved in, trees=
 have grown and fallen across the rows, and seedlings (pulapula) have grown=
 up everywhere to the point that the rows are no longer really distinguisha=
ble, and merely trying to walk through
 the patch (about a third of an acre) is a real test.  Some areas are navig=
able only by the feral pigs who live back there and the ever-present mosqui=
tos are exceedingly welcoming in their own unpleasant fashion.  Anyhoo, the=
re are things the coffee plants seem to enjoy about their neglected status =
and they are loaded with fruit and it is coming ripe, now.
Weekends ha=
ve me back in "my" patch trying to reclaim some semblance of order, whackin=
g weeds, pulling pulapula, making pathways through the patch to facilitate =
picking, and of course, picking!  The coffee here is the same type that is =
grown in Kona, and many say coffee growing on this Island started here and =
moved to Kona where the conditions are better.  We're only 650 feet and get=
 120+ inches per year of rainfall.  Regardless of that, the fruit is prolif=
ic and beautiful!  Our picking season just started a few weeks ago and now =
I have to back there every weekend to pick or the fruit over ripens and fal=
ls or is eaten by birds.  Each weekend yields more than the week before.  B=
ecause of the rough overgrown terrain the picking is quite difficult (espec=
ially when dressed for 'skitters) but will be easier as my reclamation effo=
rts progress.  I am estimating about 25 - 30 pounds of green by December.  =
That will be enough for us, supplemented with our
 Sumatran, Ethiopian, Mexican, and other greens, for the year and provide s=
ome gifts for friends at Christmas.  Our coffee is very, very good and I su=
spect as the season progresses will get better.  Unfortunately, I'm not an =
expert at description of fragrance, aroma, or taste and so plan to take som=
e to the cupping experts on the Kona side for an opinion.  I do all the pro=
cessing here using a wet fermentation to dissolve the mucilage coat, and ai=
r dry the beans naturally.
If any of you out there are qualified exper=
ts at cupping, I could send a packet of greens for you to roast and cup (wh=
oa! not everyone at once!! Show me your bona fides!! :) )  I'd like to post=
 a few pictures; does the List have a facility for sharing photos?  I don't=
 have my own website...yet.
OKAY! Enough for now.  What an exhausting =
introduction!  My apologies for the long post and now for a final question:=
  Does anyone know of a manual device for small batch de-pulping (to separa=
te the seeds from the cherry)??  My fingers are suffering from pulping all =
this coffee by hand and my wife wants a raise!  Help!
Cheers and aloha=
,
Chris homeroast mailing=
 listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change you=
r personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to ht=
tp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings==
Check out the hottest 2008 models today at Yahoo! Autos.http://au=tos.yahoo.com/new_cars.html

3) From: jim gundlach
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Chris,
     Welcome to the list.  What a back yard find.  I think the folks  
on this list will be very interested in your description of this new  
adventure.
           pecan jim
On Sep 14, 2007, at 4:12 PM, Chris Hardenbrook wrote:
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Chris,    Welcome to = the list.  What a back yard find.  I think the folks on this list = will be very interested in your description of this new = adventure.          pecan jim On = Sep 14, 2007, at 4:12 PM, Chris Hardenbrook wrote:
G'morning = to all (yes, it's still morning here in the Hawaiian Islands)! I = am new to the list and thought I'd drop a little note to introduce = myself.  My wife, Leslie, and I moved to the Big Island in Feb from = Redondo Beach in CA.  I was offered a job here by the Center for = Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML), which is run by = Colorado State University to ensure the sustainability of Mother Earth = to support military training activities at Pohakuloa Training Area = (PTA).  I am not military myself, just happy to help our Mother = sustain the various indignities we humans inflict upon her.  I am a = cartographer (in modern parlance: a Geographic Information System (GIS) = specialist) and am mapping the habitat for Threatened and Endangered = species and archaeologically sensitive areas so troops will keep their = boots away from them. Since work is the top center of the Island = at 6,500 ft, and there is nowhere within 45 minutes drive of the Base to = live, we have a choice of living on the Kona side or the Hilo side.  I = choose the wet side, Hilo, for its funky ambiance and that it boasts the = lowest cost-of-living index in the State, and therefore, was affordable = to buy a home.  The big bonus was finding that just over our back = fence, which is undeveloped jungle (is that redundant??), is an = abandoned coffee patch!  It was probably planted 30 - 50 years ago = judging by the stump diameters.  At one time it was no doubt a = well-cleared area with the coffee trees deliberately and knowledgeably = maintained and pruned.  Now, it has been neglected for a decade, at = least.  The vines and guava have moved in, trees have grown and fallen = across the rows, and seedlings (pulapula) have grown up everywhere to = the point that the rows are no longer really distinguishable, and merely = trying to walk through the patch (about a third of an acre) is a real = test.  Some areas are navigable only by the feral pigs who live back = there and the ever-present mosquitos are exceedingly welcoming in their = own unpleasant fashion.  Anyhoo, there are things the coffee plants = seem to enjoy about their neglected status and they are loaded with = fruit and it is coming ripe, now. Weekends have me back in "my" = patch trying to reclaim some semblance of order, whacking weeds, pulling = pulapula, making pathways through the patch to facilitate picking, and = of course, picking!  The coffee here is the same type that is grown in = Kona, and many say coffee growing on this Island started here and moved = to Kona where the conditions are better.  We're only 650 feet and get = 120+ inches per year of rainfall.  Regardless of that, the fruit is = prolific and beautiful!  Our picking season just started a few weeks = ago and now I have to back there every weekend to pick or the fruit over = ripens and falls or is eaten by birds.  Each weekend yields more than = the week before.  Because of the rough overgrown terrain the picking = is quite difficult (especially when dressed for 'skitters) but will be = easier as my reclamation efforts progress.  I am estimating about 25 - = 30 pounds of green by December.  That will be enough for us, = supplemented with our Sumatran, Ethiopian, Mexican, and other greens, = for the year and provide some gifts for friends at Christmas.  Our = coffee is very, very good and I suspect as the season progresses will = get better.  Unfortunately, I'm not an expert at description of = fragrance, aroma, or taste and so plan to take some to the cupping = experts on the Kona side for an opinion.  I do all the processing here = using a wet fermentation to dissolve the mucilage coat, and air dry the = beans naturally. If any of you out there are qualified experts = at cupping, I could send a packet of greens for you to roast and cup = (whoa! not everyone at once!! Show me your bona fides!! :) )  I'd like = to post a few pictures; does the List have a facility for sharing = photos?  I don't have my own website...yet. OKAY! Enough for = now.  What an exhausting introduction!  My apologies for the long = post and now for a final question:  Does anyone know of a manual = device for small batch de-pulping (to separate the seeds from the = cherry)??  My fingers are suffering from pulping all this coffee by = hand and my wife wants a raise!  Help! Cheers and aloha, = Chris homeroast mailing = list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<= BR>= --Apple-Mail-2-1045951620--

4) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Snip: from Chris Hardenbrook's post>
<Snip>
myself.  My wife, Leslie, and I moved to the Big Island in Feb from =
Redondo Beach in CA. 
You Lucky dog, Hawaii and coffee at your back door.
IMO Les (Thor Tampers) and Mike Mc coffee are the two you would want to =
roast and cup your Kona coffee.
Both frequent the list and I'm sure they would welcome the chance to =
help you out.
Cheers
RK

5) From: Robert Joslin
Chris
     Welcome to the list.  You sound like an really interesting guy and you
are one lucky devil!!  Please post often and keep us filled in with all the
details.  Hawaii AND a coffee patch to boot.
Damn!!!                                    Josh
On 9/14/07, jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Andy Thomas
Welcome, Chris. I remember Pohakuloa as a fascinating, if somewhat bleak an=
d haunting area. I have driven across the island on the Saddle Road a few t=
imes -- illegally in a rental car -- and camped once at the state park ther=
e. I remember poking around in a kipuka along the road and stumbling upon s=
omeone's secret pakalolo plantation. 
I hope someone on the list can a=
nswer your question about pulping. I would definitely be interested in tryi=
ng a bit of your coffee once you get it processed. And pictures would be gr=
eat. You can post photos on a site like Snapfish.
So, the birds are ea=
ting the coffee berries.... That has possibilities -- mynah bird kope! That=
 might solve the pulping problem. too.
120 inches is a LOT of rain! Ca=
n you say mildew?
Andy
----- Original Message ----
From: Chris =
Hardenbrook 
Subject: +Greetings from Hilo
=
G'morning to all (yes, it's still morning here in the Hawaiian
Isla=
nds)!
[...etc]=
Be a bette=
r Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows. Yahoo! An=
swers - Check it out.http://answers.yahoo.com/dir/?link=list&sid=396=545469

7) From: Floyd Lozano
Welcome, and when it comes time to give that stuff away feel free to
consider me a friend ;)
-F
On 9/14/07, Chris Hardenbrook  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: raymanowen
OMG Chris! The post really exists. I couldn't trust my short term
memory or my box of 1's and 0's, but it's still on the server using my
daughter's computer.
What serendipity! With the luck of the Welsh, if it happened to me,
I'd revisit the site and find it's really a USGS monitoring station.
The gate guard would be named "Khaldi," and the whole thing was just a
Spike Jones dream.
It's probably mid morning/ Sat. 16 Sept 2007, so:
Magandang Umaga and Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On 9/14/07, Chris Hardenbrook  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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