HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Learning curve (28 msgs / 1271 lines)
1) From: Slinkster
After a couple of months with the little 2-cup Hario vacpot I decided to 
upgrade to the Yama 8-cup model.  Talk about your learning curves.  I 
figured I'd use same quantities of water and coffee for my first run 
with the Yama as I use with the Hario and produce equivalent results.  
Gosh, was I wrong!  20g of coffee with 10oz of water produced dishwater 
- I forgot that a flat-bottom stovetop pot would retain more water than 
the Hario's globular tabletop pot.  Oops.
Of course the Yama needed some packing materials to ensure it's safety 
at Brown's hands so I ordered 10# of beans.  Tomorrow, roasting.  And of 
course more stovetop brewing!

2) From: gin
hey slink...
you go guy!
new world every day!!
ginny
---- Slinkster  wrote: 
<Snip>

3) From: JoAnne Phillips
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What a week this has been.  I've read all your posts, sometimes two  
and three times, spent hours on SM's site with the notes Maria and  
Tom put there on how to get good coffee, etc.  I re-read the  
instructions that came with my iRoast (not 2) programed in Tom's  
suggested profile and made another batch of shiny black coffee that  
was definitely French Roast or worse.  I'd dropped the amount of  
beans from 150g to 130g too.  So I sat down and re-read everything  
all over again and this time I spotted this:  program a long third  
stage so you can hit cool when you have the degree of roast you  
want.  I'm sure that print was there all the time, but I just didn't  
see it.
I'd bought the iRoast to replace my little Fresh Roast 8 as I wanted  
to have a 'ramped' roast to see if that would improve my roasts and  
also I'd been using it since my first green been order back in April  
of '05.  I figured I'd retire it and keep it for a backup.  The FR8  
is so quiet I can hear every pop and crackle of 1st crack and the  
first gentle pops of 2nd.  At that point I'd turn it off and dump  
everything into a colander.  Hey, it may be not great, but I was  
getting some very enjoyable coffee.  But Tom talks about all those  
wonderful flavors and I sure wasn't getting anything but excellent  
coffee (I'm not complaining, but I wanted more).
You folks gave me lots of good ideas to try - remove the top screen,  
vent with a hose and exhaust vent, etc.  I couldn't see how to get  
the top screen out of the lid without doing major damage and my  
kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect  
flunked that course).  So I just made up my mind I was going to  
figure out how to use this thing with it put together the way the  
manufacturer intended.  I tweaked the third stage of Tom's suggested  
profile from 460 f for 4:30 to 435 f for 4:30.  I can't really hear  
the cracks with this machine, but a few extra loud pops get through.   
I knew from experience with the FR8 that 1st crack usually lasts  
about 1 minute.  So when I heard the pops I watched the time and  
watched the color of the beans and sniffed the exhaust (not really  
smoke) and with 1 minute 50 seconds left on the display I hit the  
cool button and held my breath.
Full time on this profile is 9:30.  At 8:15 I noted some shedding of  
chaff, at 6:30 the machine slowed and the beans had turned a very  
light tan.  At 5:30 (display said temp was 372) they were a darker  
tan and I got a slightly sweet scent.  At 4:30 it slowed again (390  
degrees).  4:01 I heard the first pop (394 degrees) beans a light  
brown.  3:00 display was 400.  3:30 display was 405 and beans are  
nice and even and browning slightly.  2:00 things about the same (I  
started to worry am I baking rather than roasting?) but the beans are  
now a nice rich brown -- ten seconds later I couldn't stand it any  
longer and pushed the cool button.  I know I'm past a city into a city 
+ or maybe FC but guys I didn't make charcoal for the first time with  
this roaster.
I'm sorry this is so long, but I'm so excited I just had to tell you  
all about it -- you were all out on that patio with me when I did  
this.  Thank you, thank you, thank . . . . .  Oh yes, the coffee  
tastes great too!
JoAnne
--Apple-Mail-4-548426015
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What a week this has been.  I've read all =
your posts, sometimes two and three times, spent hours on SM's site with =
the notes Maria and Tom put there on how to get good coffee, etc.  =
I re-read the instructions that came with my iRoast (not 2) programed in =
Tom's suggested profile and made another batch of shiny black coffee =
that was definitely French Roast or worse.  I'd dropped the amount of =
beans from 150g to 130g too.  So I sat down and re-read everything all =
over again and this time I spotted this:  program a long third stage so you =
can hit cool when you have the degree of roast you want.  I'm sure that print was there all the time, but I just =
didn't see it. 
I'd bought the iRoast to = replace my little Fresh Roast 8 as I wanted to have a 'ramped' roast to = see if that would improve my roasts and also I'd been using it since my = first green been order back in April of '05.  I figured I'd retire it = and keep it for a backup.  The FR8 is so quiet I can hear every pop = and crackle of 1st crack and the first gentle pops of 2nd.  At that = point I'd turn it off and dump everything into a colander.  Hey, it = may be not great, but I was getting some very enjoyable coffee.  But = Tom talks about all those wonderful flavors and I sure wasn't getting = anything but excellent coffee (I'm not complaining, but I wanted = more).
You = folks gave me lots of good ideas to try - remove the top screen, vent = with a hose and exhaust vent, etc.  I couldn't see how to get the top = screen out of the lid without doing major damage and my kitchen hood = vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect flunked that = course).  So I just made up my mind I was going to figure out how to = use this thing with it put together the way the manufacturer intended.  = I tweaked the third stage of Tom's suggested profile from 460 f for = 4:30 to 435 f for 4:30.  I can't really hear the cracks with this = machine, but a few extra loud pops get through.  I knew from = experience with the FR8 that 1st crack usually lasts about 1 minute.  = So when I heard the pops I watched the time and watched the color of the = beans and sniffed the exhaust (not really smoke) and with 1 minute 50 = seconds left on the display I hit the cool button and held my = breath.
Full = time on this profile is 9:30.  At 8:15 I noted some shedding of chaff, = at 6:30 the machine slowed and the beans had turned a very light tan.  = At 5:30 (display said temp was 372) they were a darker tan and I got a = slightly sweet scent.  At 4:30 it slowed again (390 degrees).  4:01 = I heard the first pop (394 degrees) beans a light brown.  3:00 display = was 400.  3:30 display was 405 and beans are nice and even and = browning slightly.  2:00 things about the same (I started to worry am = I baking rather than roasting?) but the beans are now a nice rich brown = -- ten seconds later I couldn't stand it any longer and pushed the cool = button.  I know I'm past a city into a city+ or maybe FC but guys I = didn't make charcoal for the first time with this roaster.
I'm sorry this is so long, = but I'm so excited I just had to tell you all about it -- you were all = out on that patio with me when I did this.  Thank you, thank you, = thank . . . . .  Oh yes, the coffee tastes great too!
JoAnne= --Apple-Mail-4-548426015--

4) From: Larry Johnson
Way to go, JoAnne! I can still remember the first roast that I "nailed" (at
least, compared with what I had been doing).  Sounds like we followed
similar paths; I started with a Whirly-Pop (2 miserable failures), got a
Fresh Roast 8, decided I wanted more (like you), got an iRoast2, but now I
do most of mine with Heat Gun / Bread Machine. Mainly for the batch size.
Keep having fun and keep posting. And there's is NO need to apologize for
your "long" post. Your post is exactly what this list is supposed to be
about. It's perfect.
Again, congratulations on your success.
On 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Congratulations, JoAnne! (Sounds like you are getting a bad case of
the coffee roasting obsession!) It's great that you are enjoying it so
much.
Brian
On 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: GHolli7210
Hello and happy roasting, If I may so bold as to offer a suggestion as to buy 
the  very excellent book written by Kenneth Davids "Home Coffee Roasting" 
Romance & Revival.
It has a passage written about water quenching that I found to work very well.
On pages 146 - 147 He describes the benefits of water quenching.
On pg. 191 - 192 He tells how to do it properly.
He says not to hit the cool cycle but rather to pour the roast in to a 
colander and finely mist the hot beans with purified water very carefully as to not 
soak the beans but toss and gently mist for just a few seconds and continue to 
cool by using a hood vent, fan or tossing
Hope this helps,
Jerry.
 
************************************** See what's new athttp://www.aol.com

7) From: JoAnne Phillips
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The first success was Nicaragua FTP Esteili-Miraflor Coop which has a  
recommendation of C+ on the label.  I did detect a sweetness in the  
'smoke' early on, but then it vanished.  I have a fondness for Kenyas  
and earlier ordered a pound each of the latest ones to appear on the  
list.  I really liked the Ruiruiru and ordered 5# of it, tomorrow I'm  
going to try getting a C+ roast on the Kenya AA Nyeri - Karatina.  If  
I like it as much as the Ruiruiru I'm going to order 5# of it too.   
It has finally cooled off enough around here that if I set my alarm  
for early I can catch some of it before it heads up to 100 again.   
iRoast says I should have ambient temps of 70 degrees -- no hope of  
that here in the Sonoran desert in summer, but early in the day I can  
catch it.  I can hardly wait for morning!
JoAnne in Tucson
On Oct 3, 2007, at 6:13 PM, Chris Hardenbrook wrote:
Yes. Good post. I have had a similar learning curve with my i-Roast,  
and no clue here, either, on how to remove the screen without  
damaging the lid.  Maybe the idea is just use an x-acto to trim it  
out?  BTW, what kind of beans are you using? Definitely, different  
beans will give different results with the same profile used, so take  
notes!
Chris in Hilo

8) From: Robert Gulley
If I am not mistaken, the I-Roast2 manual says not to turn off the 
machine or try to open it until the cool cycle is finished - it may 
mess up the machine. I don't know if the I-Roast is the same, but I 
believe the book you cite only deals with the hearthware roaster, 
which is the model before the I-Roast.
RG
At 09:43 PM 10/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: GHolli7210
I do stand corrected, I know nothing about the I-Roast machines, Please do 
follow the manufactures manual. I roast with a GC that I can adjust times and 
cycles that allow me to water quench if I choose do so. I just found the reading 
to be very informative.
Jerry
************************************** See what's new athttp://www.aol.com

10) From: Larry Williams
I have the IR2 and hit the cool button when I get the right color.  
Works great for me.
Larry Williams
JoAnne Phillips wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.13.39/1044 - Release Date: 10/2/2007 11:10 AM

11) From: JoAnne Phillips
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On Oct 3, 2007, at 7:31 PM, Robert Gulley wrote:
If I am not mistaken, the I-Roast2 manual says not to turn off the  
machine or try to open it until the cool cycle is finished - it may  
mess up the machine. I don't know if the I-Roast is the same, but I  
believe the book you cite only deals with the hearthware roaster,  
which is the model before the I-Roast.
RG
At 09:43 PM 10/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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On Oct 3, 2007, at = 7:31 PM, Robert Gulley wrote:
If I am not = mistaken, the I-Roast2 manual says not to turn off the machine or try to = open it until the cool cycle is finished - it may mess up the machine. I = don't know if the I-Roast is the same, but I believe the book you cite = only deals with the hearthware roaster, which is the model before the = I-Roast. RG At 09:43 PM 10/3/2007, you wrote: = Hello and happy roasting, If I may so bold as to offer a = suggestion as to buy the  very excellent book written by Kenneth = Davids "Home Coffee Roasting" Romance & Revival. It has a = passage written about water quenching that I found to work very = well. On pages 146 - 147 He describes the benefits of water = quenching. On pg. 191 - 192 He tells how to do it properly. He = says not to hit the cool cycle but rather to pour the roast in to a = colander and finely mist the hot beans with purified water very = carefully as to not soak the beans but toss and gently mist for just a = few seconds and continue to cool by using a hood vent, fan or = tossing Hope this helps, Jerry.   = See what's new at AOL.com and = Ma= ke AOL Your Homepage. = --Apple-Mail-3-560971446--

12) From: JoAnne Phillips
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Always happy to learn of another book about coffee.  Thanks, JoAnne
On Oct 3, 2007, at 7:52 PM, GHolli7210 wrote:
I do stand corrected, I know nothing about the I-Roast machines,  
Please do follow the manufactures manual. I roast with a GC that I  
can adjust times and cycles that allow me to water quench if I choose  
do so. I just found the reading to be very informative.
Jerry
See what's new at AOL.com and Make AOL Your Homepage.
--Apple-Mail-4-561020686
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Always happy to learn of =
another book about coffee.  Thanks, JoAnne
On Oct =
3, 2007, at 7:52 PM, GHolli7210 =
wrote:
I do stand = corrected, I know nothing about the I-Roast machines, Please do follow = the manufactures manual. I roast with a GC that I can adjust times and = cycles that allow me to water quench if I choose do so. I just found the = reading to be very informative. = Jerry See what's = new at AOL.com and Make AOL Your = Homepage. = --Apple-Mail-4-561020686--

13) From: Robert Gulley
I'll throw in my recommendation of Kenneth Davids "Home Coffee 
Roasting" Romance & Revival
with Jerry - just bought it a few weeks ago and it has been a very 
enjoyable (and informative) read for a newbie like me.
RG
At 11:38 PM 10/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Joseph Robertson
Robert,
Thank you, I almost went to Amazon and bought the book. Not that I wouldn't
enjoy the book. I'm just prone to go off half cocked when I'm so excited
about something like Coffee Roasting. I'm trying to get better at collecting
as much information as possible. That's what makes this list so wonderful.
So many idea's and tips so fast.
Cheers
JoeR
On 10/3/07, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all> wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Your post made me :-) Kudos. But couldn't figure out how to clap via the
keyboard! FWIW City+ Light Full City is usually a good starting trial roast
just about any bean.
 
Never stop being open to learning and the Journey that is Koffee will always
remain fresh, challenging and rewarding. 
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of JoAnne Phillips
Sent: Wednesday, October 03, 2007 5:08 PM
What a week this has been. I've read all your posts, sometimes two and three
times, spent hours on SM's site with the notes Maria and Tom put there on
how to get good coffee, etc. I re-read the instructions that came with my
iRoast (not 2) programed in Tom's suggested profile and made another batch
of shiny black coffee that was definitely French Roast or worse. I'd dropped
the amount of beans from 150g to 130g too. So I sat down and re-read
everything all over again and this time I spotted this: program a long third
stage so you can hit cool when you have the degree of roast you want. I'm
sure that print was there all the time, but I just didn't see it. 
I'd bought the iRoast to replace my little Fresh Roast 8 as I wanted to have
a 'ramped' roast to see if that would improve my roasts and also I'd been
using it since my first green been order back in April of '05. I figured I'd
retire it and keep it for a backup. The FR8 is so quiet I can hear every pop
and crackle of 1st crack and the first gentle pops of 2nd. At that point I'd
turn it off and dump everything into a colander. Hey, it may be not great,
but I was getting some very enjoyable coffee. But Tom talks about all those
wonderful flavors and I sure wasn't getting anything but excellent coffee
(I'm not complaining, but I wanted more).
You folks gave me lots of good ideas to try - remove the top screen, vent
with a hose and exhaust vent, etc. I couldn't see how to get the top screen
out of the lid without doing major damage and my kitchen hood vents into the
kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect flunked that course). So I just made
up my mind I was going to figure out how to use this thing with it put
together the way the manufacturer intended. I tweaked the third stage of
Tom's suggested profile from 460 f for 4:30 to 435 f for 4:30. I can't
really hear the cracks with this machine, but a few extra loud pops get
through. I knew from experience with the FR8 that 1st crack usually lasts
about 1 minute. So when I heard the pops I watched the time and watched the
color of the beans and sniffed the exhaust (not really smoke) and with 1
minute 50 seconds left on the display I hit the cool button and held my
breath.
Full time on this profile is 9:30. At 8:15 I noted some shedding of chaff,
at 6:30 the machine slowed and the beans had turned a very light tan. At
5:30 (display said temp was 372) they were a darker tan and I got a slightly
sweet scent. At 4:30 it slowed again (390 degrees). 4:01 I heard the first
pop (394 degrees) beans a light brown. 3:00 display was 400. 3:30 display
was 405 and beans are nice and even and browning slightly. 2:00 things about
the same (I started to worry am I baking rather than roasting?) but the
beans are now a nice rich brown -- ten seconds later I couldn't stand it any
longer and pushed the cool button. I know I'm past a city into a city+ or
maybe FC but guys I didn't make charcoal for the first time with this
roaster.
I'm sorry this is so long, but I'm so excited I just had to tell you all
about it -- you were all out on that patio with me when I did this. Thank
you, thank you, thank . . . . . Oh yes, the coffee tastes great too!
JoAnne

16) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Robert, 
 
I wasn't going to say anything about the book in question referenced earlier
posts but as you venture forward toward opening a your coffee roastery it
really has little to nothing of value to offer you IMO. OTOH it can be a fun
and informative read for beginning the Journey of a home roaster, but it is
not a "wealth" of substantive roasting information by a long shot.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Joseph Robertson
Sent: Wednesday, October 03, 2007 9:21 PM
Robert,
Thank you, I almost went to Amazon and bought the book. Not that I wouldn't
enjoy the book. I'm just prone to go off half cocked when I'm so excited
about something like Coffee Roasting. I'm trying to get better at collecting
as much information as possible. That's what makes this list so wonderful.
So many idea's and tips so fast. 
Cheers
JoeR
At 09:43 PM 10/3/2007, you wrote:
Hello and happy roasting, If I may so bold as to offer a suggestion as to
buy the  very excellent book written by Kenneth Davids "Home Coffee
Roasting" Romance & Revival.
It has a passage written about water quenching that I found to work very
well.
On pages 146 - 147 He describes the benefits of water quenching.
On pg. 191 - 192 He tells how to do it properly.
He says not to hit the cool cycle but rather to pour the roast in to a
colander and finely mist the hot beans with purified water very carefully as
to not soak the beans but toss and gently mist for just a few seconds and
continue to cool by using a hood vent, fan or tossing
Hope this helps,
Jerry.

17) From: Robert Gulley
Joe
Glad to be of help - so many people have helped me! I am enjoying 
that book by the way - I am like you in that I am trying to read and 
roast as much as possible to learn all that I can each time I roast. 
I'm on my 16th roast and haven't even begun to scratch the surface with my IR2!
And don't get me started on the changes I see happening to the roasts 
over time - each day the taste seems different. Now I am trying to 
learn some restraint by letting the roasts sit for a few days . . .
RG
At 12:21 AM 10/4/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Robert Gulley
Hi Mike
I think you have me confused with another Robert - no plans for 
opening a shop yet! I am one of those newbie roasters. Just been 
roast about a month!
RG
At 12:31 AM 10/4/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Joseph Robertson
JoAnne,
Congrats,
I'm only a few months ahead of you. I bought a IR2 to get my feet wet with
this new passion. I'm the guy or one of them who talked about removing the
screens. It was not easy. If I had read the post here about using the x-acto
I probably would have cut them out somehow. I did get the parts back
together but it took some work. Point being I believe my roasts are easier
to control. Not to mention you don't have to worry about chaff getting stuck
in the screens and affecting the air flow. Obviously I'm not too concerned
about the warranty. I just love to Mod and tweak for better performance.
When I used my IR2 the first time I was so excited I took it over to my best
friends house to roast with friends. One person knew a lot more about good
coffee than I did. He read the manual in a few minutes and we used the
second profile to start. We were roasting Kenya peaberry. He went
intuitively and by color and smell stopped the roast when he though it was
done. WOW. I told him coffee is supposed to rest. He said Yaa, ok, it can
rest tomorrow. That is what we don't try now. So not long after it cooled we
had a cowboy cupping session. One cup of out of this world, like nothing I
have every tasted, passed among the six of us like some rare herb from a
60's jam session.
I had to take pictures to remember this special day.
What I got from this was a lesson in roasting by site and smell instead of
profile. I'm sure once I learn to use profile roasting it will improve my
roasts but for now I just feel closer to the process this way.
For now just using the second profile and stopping when the particular type
of bean reaches that magic moment.
Thanks for sharing. Long posts help get your feeling and passion across to
us. Don't worry about that. Reading your post is like reliving those moments
for many of us.
May the finest roast force be with you,
JoeR
On 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Joseph Robertson
Thanks Mike,
I was actually responding to Roberts post. I'm JoeR
I do appreciate your comments on this. Linda my partner is the one who has
been to roasting school in Vermont and has much more time in the roasting
saddle.  I'm a serious junior jedi when it comes to roasting. Not to mention
anything like the Probat like she is more familiar with. Until we get up and
running I'm anxious to get a hold of Joe's Behmor to work with larger
batches.
Mike, speaking of books do you have any suggestions for a junior java
commercially directed jedi? There are so many out there. It's so hard to
choose when you can't see feel and read some pages first.
Cheers,
JoeR
On 10/3/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: raymanowen
"...my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect
flunked that course)."
The winter will save some rather big heating bucks and prevent cold make up
air being introduced into your home in unintended spots. With a new tight
home, the make up air will be drawn down furnace and water heater flues, for
example.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips < jmphillips1> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

22) From: JoAnne Phillips
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Not Tucson it won't.  JoAnne
On Oct 4, 2007, at 5:45 PM, raymanowen wrote:
"...my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what  
architect flunked that course)."
The winter will save some rather big heating bucks and prevent cold  
make up air being introduced into your home in unintended spots. With  
a new tight home, the make up air will be drawn down furnace and  
water heater flues, for example.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips < jmphillips1> wrote:
What a week this has been.  I've read all your posts, sometimes two  
and three times, spent hours on SM's site with the notes Maria and  
Tom put there on how to get good coffee, etc.  I re-read the  
instructions that came with my iRoast (not 2) programed in Tom's  
suggested profile and made another batch of shiny black coffee that  
was definitely French Roast or worse.  I'd dropped the amount of  
beans from 150g to 130g too.  So I sat down and re-read everything  
all over again and this time I spotted this:  program a long third  
stage so you can hit cool when you have the degree of roast you  
want.  I'm sure that print was there all the time, but I just didn't  
see it.
I'd bought the iRoast to replace my little Fresh Roast 8 as I wanted  
to have a 'ramped' roast to see if that would improve my roasts and  
also I'd been using it since my first green been order back in April  
of '05.  I figured I'd retire it and keep it for a backup.  The FR8  
is so quiet I can hear every pop and crackle of 1st crack and the  
first gentle pops of 2nd.  At that point I'd turn it off and dump  
everything into a colander.  Hey, it may be not great, but I was  
getting some very enjoyable coffee.  But Tom talks about all those  
wonderful flavors and I sure wasn't getting anything but excellent  
coffee (I'm not complaining, but I wanted more).
You folks gave me lots of good ideas to try - remove the top screen,  
vent with a hose and exhaust vent, etc.  I couldn't see how to get  
the top screen out of the lid without doing major damage and my  
kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect  
flunked that course).  So I just made up my mind I was going to  
figure out how to use this thing with it put together the way the  
manufacturer intended.  I tweaked the third stage of Tom's suggested  
profile from 460 f for 4:30 to 435 f for 4:30.  I can't really hear  
the cracks with this machine, but a few extra loud pops get through.   
I knew from experience with the FR8 that 1st crack usually lasts  
about 1 minute.  So when I heard the pops I watched the time and  
watched the color of the beans and sniffed the exhaust (not really  
smoke) and with 1 minute 50 seconds left on the display I hit the  
cool button and held my breath.
Full time on this profile is 9:30.  At 8:15 I noted some shedding of  
chaff, at 6:30 the machine slowed and the beans had turned a very  
light tan.  At 5:30 (display said temp was 372) they were a darker  
tan and I got a slightly sweet scent.  At 4:30 it slowed again (390  
degrees).  4:01 I heard the first pop (394 degrees) beans a light  
brown.  3:00 display was 400.  3:30 display was 405 and beans are  
nice and even and browning slightly.  2:00 things about the same (I  
started to worry am I baking rather than roasting?) but the beans are  
now a nice rich brown -- ten seconds later I couldn't stand it any  
longer and pushed the cool button.  I know I'm past a city into a city 
+ or maybe FC but guys I didn't make charcoal for the first time with  
this roaster.
I'm sorry this is so long, but I'm so excited I just had to tell you  
all about it -- you were all out on that patio with me when I did  
this.  Thank you, thank you, thank . . . . .  Oh yes, the coffee  
tastes great too!
JoAnne
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the  
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
--Apple-Mail-4-639644132
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Not Tucson it won't.  =
JoAnne
On Oct 4, 2007, at 5:45 PM, raymanowen =
wrote:
"...my kitchen = hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder what architect flunked that = course)." The winter will save some rather big heating = bucks and prevent cold make up air being introduced into your home in = unintended spots. With a new tight home, the make up air will be drawn = down furnace and water heater flues, for example. Cheers, = Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa! On = 10/3/07, JoAnne Phillips < jmphillips1> = wrote:What a week this has been.  I've read all your posts, = sometimes two and three times, spent hours on SM's site with the notes = Maria and Tom put there on how to get good coffee, etc.  I re-read = the instructions that came with my iRoast (not 2) programed in Tom's = suggested profile and made another batch of shiny black coffee that was = definitely French Roast or worse.  I'd dropped the amount of beans = from 150g to 130g too.  So I sat down and re-read everything all over = again and this time I spotted this:  program a long third stage so you = can hit cool when you have the degree of roast you want.  = I'm sure that print was there all the time, but I just didn't see it.  = I'd bought the iRoast to replace my = little Fresh Roast 8 as I wanted to have a 'ramped' roast to see if that = would improve my roasts and also I'd been using it since my first green = been order back in April of '05.  I figured I'd retire it and keep it = for a backup.  The FR8 is so quiet I can hear every pop and crackle of = 1st crack and the first gentle pops of 2nd.  At that point I'd turn it = off and dump everything into a colander.  Hey, it may be not great, = but I was getting some very enjoyable coffee.  But Tom talks about all = those wonderful flavors and I sure wasn't getting anything but excellent = coffee (I'm not complaining, but I wanted more). = You folks gave me lots of good ideas to try - = remove the top screen, vent with a hose and exhaust vent, etc.  I = couldn't see how to get the top screen out of the lid without doing = major damage and my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I wonder = what architect flunked that course).  So I just made up my mind I was = going to figure out how to use this thing with it put together the way = the manufacturer intended.  I tweaked the third stage of Tom's = suggested profile from 460 f for 4:30 to 435 f for 4:30.  I can't = really hear the cracks with this machine, but a few extra loud pops get = through.  I knew from experience with the FR8 that 1st crack usually = lasts about 1 minute.  So when I heard the pops I watched the time and = watched the color of the beans and sniffed the exhaust (not really = smoke) and with 1 minute 50 seconds left on the display I hit the cool = button and held my breath. Full time on this = profile is 9:30.  At 8:15 I noted some shedding of chaff, at 6:30 the = machine slowed and the beans had turned a very light tan.  At 5:30 = (display said temp was 372) they were a darker tan and I got a slightly = sweet scent.  At 4:30 it slowed again (390 degrees).  4:01 I heard = the first pop (394 degrees) beans a light brown.  3:00 display was = 400.  3:30 display was 405 and beans are nice and even and browning = slightly.  2:00 things about the same (I started to worry am I baking = rather than roasting?) but the beans are now a nice rich brown -- ten = seconds later I couldn't stand it any longer and pushed the cool = button.  I know I'm past a city into a city+ or maybe FC but guys I = didn't make charcoal for the first time with this roaster. = I'm sorry this is so long, but I'm so excited = I just had to tell you all about it -- you were all out on that patio = with me when I did this.  Thank you, thank you, thank . . . . .  Oh = yes, the coffee tastes great too! = JoAnne
-- "When the theme hits the bass, = I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC = Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976 = --Apple-Mail-4-639644132--

23) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-66-647479009
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Less expensive range hoods don't vent to the outside but just  
recirculate the air through a filter and back into the room.   
Sometimes you don't have the option of cutting into a wall and/or  
ducting to the outside because of the location of the stove.
On Oct 4, 2007, at 7:45 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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Less expensive range hoods don't vent to the outside but just =
recirculate the air through a filter and back into the room.  Sometimes =
you don't have the option of cutting into a wall and/or ducting to the =
outside because of the location of the stove.
On Oct 4, =
2007, at 7:45 PM, raymanowen =
wrote:
"...my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I = wonder what architect flunked that course)." The winter = will save some rather big heating bucks and prevent cold make up air = being introduced into your home in unintended spots. With a new tight = home, the make up air will be drawn down furnace and water heater flues, = for example. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-66-647479009--

24) From: Joseph Robertson
Sandy,
Very well put. I have installed a few of these and was going to say
something but you nailed it.
You sound like a professional yourself. Or one serious DYIer.
Cheers,
JoeR
On 10/4/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: JoAnne Phillips
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No matter what the reason is, it makes it useless for cooking and for  
roasting.  At this time of year I can get up early and roast with no  
problem.  During the summer it is just too hot to use the i-R outside  
(and inside too for that matter as the house runs at 80).  Most days,  
even in the middle of winter it will get up to 70 on my patio so I  
should have it made.  It is the summer that does me in.  My Fresh  
Roast 8 doesn't seem to mind the heat.  It may roast a little faster,  
but I can hear the cracks with it and I go by that.  It just doesn't  
hold very much and I'm anxious to try a ramped roast.  Well, I have  
all winter don't I?
JoAnne
On Oct 4, 2007, at 8:39 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
Less expensive range hoods don't vent to the outside but just  
recirculate the air through a filter and back into the room.   
Sometimes you don't have the option of cutting into a wall and/or  
ducting to the outside because of the location of the stove.
On Oct 4, 2007, at 7:45 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-2-663008439
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No matter what the reason =
is, it makes it useless for cooking and for roasting.  At this time of =
year I can get up early and roast with no problem.  During the summer =
it is just too hot to use the i-R outside (and inside too for that =
matter as the house runs at 80).  Most days, even in the middle of =
winter it will get up to 70 on my patio so I should have it made.  It =
is the summer that does me in.  My Fresh Roast 8 doesn't seem to mind =
the heat.  It may roast a little faster, but I can hear the cracks =
with it and I go by that.  It just doesn't hold very much and I'm =
anxious to try a ramped roast.  Well, I have all winter don't =
I?
JoAnne On = Oct 4, 2007, at 8:39 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
Less expensive range hoods don't = vent to the outside but just recirculate the air through a filter and = back into the room.  Sometimes you don't have the option of cutting = into a wall and/or ducting to the outside because of the location of the = stove. On Oct 4, 2007, at 7:45 PM, raymanowen = wrote:
"...my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I = wonder what architect flunked that course)." The winter = will save some rather big heating bucks and prevent cold make up air = being introduced into your home in unintended spots. With a new tight = home, the make up air will be drawn down furnace and water heater flues, = for example. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-2-663008439--

26) From: Robert Gulley
JoAnne
One thought for you that has worked for me during the summer in my 
kitchen is to have a fan blowing across the room as I roast (lowering 
the ambient temp slightly. I have been able to roast with the IR2 
that way pretty consistently. I typically roast to a range of City+ 
to Full City+ depending on the coffee, and so far the smoke is 
manageable (much better than I anticipated) and my roasts seem to be 
pretty consistent. Then as soon as the roaster finished its cooling 
cycle, I dump the beans in the metal colander, and stir them in front 
of the fan for faster cool down.
RG
At 03:58 AM 10/5/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Sandy Andina
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Hey, Joe (where you goin' with that nail gun in your hand)--obscure  
rock & roll reference,
Not a DIY'er--my hand tool of choice is a telephone or computer mouse  
to find contractors. But we did have occasion to replace our stove 20  
years ago and had our hearts set on a real venting range hood; alas,  
we had to settle for a Broan recirculating pseudo-hood because the  
stove is nowhere near anywhere we could vent to the outside without  
$1000 worth of ductwork through the walls and out the side.
On Oct 5, 2007, at 12:24 AM, Joseph Robertson wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-71-714569195
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Hey, Joe (where you goin' with that nail gun in your hand)--obscure rock =
& roll reference,
Not a DIY'er--my hand tool = of choice is a telephone or computer mouse to find contractors. But we = did have occasion to replace our stove 20 years ago and had our hearts = set on a real venting range hood; alas, we had to settle for a Broan = recirculating pseudo-hood because the stove is nowhere near anywhere we = could vent to the outside without $1000 worth of ductwork through the = walls and out the side. On Oct 5, 2007, at 12:24 AM, Joseph = Robertson wrote:
Sandy, Very well put. I have installed a few of these = and was going to say something but you nailed it. You sound like a = professional yourself. Or one serious = DYIer. Cheers, JoeR On = 10/4/07, Sandy Andina <sandraandina> = wrote: Less expensive range hoods don't vent to the = outside but just recirculate the air through a filter and back into the = room.  Sometimes you don't have the option of cutting into a wall = and/or ducting to the outside because of the location of the stove. = On Oct 4, 2007, at 7:45 PM, raymanowen = wrote: "...my kitchen hood vents into the kitchen (duh, I = wonder what architect flunked that course)." The winter = will save some rather big heating bucks and prevent cold make up air = being introduced into your home in unintended spots. With a new tight = home, the make up air will be drawn down furnace and water heater flues, = for example. Sandy = www.sandyandina.comwww.sass-music.com = = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-71-714569195--

28) From: Bailey Blanchette
nice hendrix reference.  I prefer nail guns to the other kind
On 10/5/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest