HomeRoast Digest


Topic: First BBQ Drum Roast (9 msgs / 525 lines)
1) From: Rob Piirainen
Greetings,
             First my regards to Tom & Maria and their integrity, it is
because of their sensible advise at their website that I began home roasting
with a Poppery II. Also I believe they bring essential expertise, skill, &
level of effort to the coffee roasting & brewing process at a reasonable
price, as a retailer they provide true added value which I cannot possibly
bring to the process.
 Also this group, coffeegeek, alt coffee, & homebarista have provided good
information that has helped me develop my strategy for home roasting &
brewing, I'll note all of these sites have served to validate the
information given at Tom & Maria's website.
 I've been happy with the Poppery II's results, truly better than pre
roasted retail beans, but I quickly decided I wanted to gain some control of
the roast profile & began to investigate the various methods to do this. I
was looking for low cost, potential for longevity, and increased batch
sizes. Since I roast for myself I decided 1 lb batch sizes would be
sufficient.
 Consequently I purchased a aluminum 1 lb drum roaster from a source on Ebay
for $60 and a Char-Broil Universal Fit Premium Electric Rotisserie from
Amazon.com for $36. Since I am using my existing 3 burner Sears gas grill
the cost of this drum roasting system was ~$100 add another ~$100 for a 35 K
BTU grill from Loews.
 The primary purpose of this summary is on the mechanics of this system. In
a word GOOD. I found it not necessary to use the meat prong on the latched
door side of the drum to secure the drum to the Rotisserie, it is on there
rock solid with one meat prong, also I used the extra collar & lock nut
provided with the rotisserie to insure the drum will not come off.
Consequently I am able to leave the drum attached to the rotisserie, when
the beans are finished roasting, I pull the assembly using $10 welding
gloves from Home Depot, stand it on end over a $7 steel bowl from Target,
trip the spring latch & the beans dump nice & clean into the bowl. I then
dump the beans & chaff on a vented aluminum pizza pan, & stand out in the
breeze in my back yard to cool the beans & let the breeze blow the chaff
away, this will work year round in South Texas, maybe not up North. Also
much more than 1/2 lb & the pizza pan won't be big enough, and then a
colander would be the way to go.
 I've started with 1/2 lb batches; I believe this will be a good size for
me. Last night I roasted a batch of SM Italian Espresso & San Jose Ocana.
1st crack occurred ~ 13 min 2nd crack ~ 18min. I took the Italian espresso
into 2nd crack, it was cracking when I dumped & cooled it, probably could've
stood to go further, I'm waiting 48 hrs before I try it. The San Jose Ocana
I pulled after it had gone through 1st crack but before it went into 2nd, it
was not cracking when I dumped & cooled it.
 I just finished my first cup of the San Jose Ocana ground with my Zass &
brewed with a press pot per SM method. It was good, I won't attempt to go
into cup descriptions, guess I need to buy Ken David’s book before I do that
& get a few more roasts under my belt.
 I believe a temperature probe underneath the drum is essential, I'm using a
long stem turkey roasting dial thermometer sold by Academy Sports ~ $4. I
installed it in the front of the grill using SM's T nut method for Popery’s
& then securing it with 2 thermometer clips provided, at $4 I popped for 2
thermometers now I have a spare.
 I am aware of the benefits of larger & stainless steel drums also of
expensive higher rpm drive motors, I am a home roaster initial results look
like this system will meet my objectives.
Rob P.
Laguna Vista, TX

2) From: Eddie Dove
Well done, Rob!  Certainly does not have to be expensive.
Do let us know how those two coffees turn out.
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 9/23/07, Rob Piirainen  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Stephen Carey
Rob, excellent post, congrats on the drum.  Do let us know the results.
I have to be honest, I am only at the IR2 stage and have so much to 
learn about it and how to handle profiles and curves on it, and there 
are many to do, that I got kind of lost on some of what you were 
talking about.  However, I started to look it up on the various pages 
and am becoming familiar with it all.  While I won't be at the drum 
stage for some time, I do wish you the absolute best of luck and skill - enjoy.
Stephen  

4) From: Sandy Andina
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Gotta echo that. I keep meaning to go the drum roast route, but when  
I figure out how much a new BBQ and rotisserie will cost (can't risk  
ruining my natural-gas grill, and can't find the f%^@ing rotisserie-- 
which I'd never taken out of the plastic!--from the old one, never  
mind dealing with propane tanks or waiting for charcoal briquets to  
come to temp and maybe affect the roast flavor), then I think,  
"hmmm.. Hottop, maybe?" and get sticker shock at the price. Might  
eventually--when Tax Refund Fairy comes to call next winter, go for a  
Behmor. But for now, it's i-R2 or SC/TO. (May dredge up the heat gun  
and buy a dog bowl just for fun, though.
On Sep 24, 2007, at 2:31 PM, Stephen Carey wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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Gotta echo that. I keep meaning to go the drum roast route, but when I =
figure out how much a new BBQ and rotisserie will cost (can't risk =
ruining my natural-gas grill, and can't find the f%^@ing =
rotisserie--which I'd never taken out of the plastic!--from the old one, =
never mind dealing with propane tanks or waiting for charcoal briquets =
to come to temp and maybe affect the roast flavor), then I think, =
"hmmm.. Hottop, maybe?" and get sticker shock at the price. Might =
eventually--when Tax Refund Fairy comes to call next winter, go for a =
Behmor. But for now, it's i-R2 or SC/TO. (May dredge up the heat gun and =
buy a dog bowl just for fun, though.
On Sep 24, 2007, at =
2:31 PM, Stephen Carey wrote:
Rob, excellent post, congrats on the drum.  Do let us know = the results. I have to be honest, I am only at the IR2 stage and = have so much to learn about it and how to handle profiles and curves on = it, and there are many to do, that I got kind of lost on some of what = you were talking about.  However, I started to look it up on the = various pages and am becoming familiar with it all.  While I won't be = at the drum stage for some time, I do wish you the absolute best of luck = and skill - enjoy. Stephen = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-98--245376695--

5) From: Rob Piirainen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Sandy, Stephen
            I'm useing a propane gas grill, no briquets involved, comes up
to temp quick ~ 5 min. I don't know how you could ruin a grill roasting
coffe in it, as long as your attentive hard to imagine starting a fire. Take
a look at the roasting profiles provided by the drum guys not much to it, of
coarse there will be nuances for tweaking results wich I will be working at.
The fundamentals are easy, I believe this only needs to be as difficult as
one wants to make it.
1. Preheat grill, 470 - 525 F
2. Insert rotissier, drum, & greens, start motor, close lid
3. Grill comes back to temp, adjust burners to desired temp.
4. 1st crack should occur 12 - 15 min back off burners to coast through 1st
crack if desired
5. 2nd crack occurs ~ 17 - 20 min
6. Pull Rotissier & dump beens for desired roast,
Those are the fundamentals I'm useing, I expect I'll develop sensory nuances
as I proceed. I'm finding the temps are easy to regulate with the gas grill
& the cracks are easier to hear than with the Poppery. My biggest concern
was handleing a 500 F drum, that is where the 1 lb aluminum drum is nice
easy to handle with Welding gloves & easy to trip the spring latch & dump
the beans.
Rob P.
LV,   TX

6) From: Sandy Andina
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What concerned me (and what I meant by "ruining" a grill) was that  
the coffee roasting smoke smells might permeate the grill (the cast- 
metal parts of my Broilmaster have a rough texture on the underside)  
and flavor any food cooked in it. (I personally wouldn't mind, but I  
can't speak for family or dinner guests).  And my grill wasn't cheap.
On Sep 24, 2007, at 3:23 PM, Rob Piirainen wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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What concerned me (and what I meant by "ruining" a grill) was that the =
coffee roasting smoke smells might permeate the grill (the cast-metal =
parts of my Broilmaster have a rough texture on the underside) and =
flavor any food cooked in it. (I personally wouldn't mind, but I can't =
speak for family or dinner guests).  And my grill wasn't =
cheap.
On Sep 24, 2007, at 3:23 PM, Rob Piirainen =
wrote:
Sandy, = Stephen           =   I'm useing a propane gas grill, no briquets involved, comes up = to temp quick ~ 5 min. I don't know how you could ruin a grill roasting = coffe in it, as long as your attentive hard to imagine starting a fire. = Take a look at the roasting profiles provided by the drum guys not much = to it, of coarse there will be nuances for tweaking results wich I will = be working at. The fundamentals are easy, I believe this only needs to = be as difficult as one wants to make it.   1. Preheat grill, 470 - 525 F 2. Insert rotissier, drum, & greens, start motor, close = lid 3. Grill comes back to temp, = adjust burners to desired temp. 4. 1st crack should occur 12 - 15 min back off burners to = coast through 1st crack if desired 5. 2nd crack occurs ~ 17 - 20 min = 6. Pull Rotissier & dump beens for = desired roast,   Those are the fundamentals I'm useing, I expect I'll develop = sensory nuances as I proceed. I'm finding the temps are easy to regulate = with the gas grill & the cracks are easier to hear than with the = Poppery. My biggest concern was handleing a 500 F drum, that is where = the 1 lb aluminum drum is nice easy to handle with Welding gloves & = easy to trip the spring latch & dump the beans. =   Rob P. LV,   TX  

7) From: Rob Piirainen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
OK, I had the flip side of that concern, i.e. my beans tasteing like steak &
pork chops from my 4 year old grill, so far I don't think thats going to be
a problem after cleaning it. Although I think the aluminum drum & grill will
benifit from some coffee seasoning, plan B is buy a $99 2 burner Char Broil
from Lowes or splurge ~$160 for anouther 3 burner. One thing you don't need
or want are the grills in when you roast coffee, also I've read where they
pull the exising grill plates & put in solid steel plates or ceramic tile.
I've not done that yet. Just shareing what I know for possible solutions.
Even with a new $99 2 burner 35k grill your looking at $200 for the system,
add $20 - 30 for a propane tank & save/keep your good grill for food, but
realy whats more important food or beans, right now I'm going with beans,
still have the George Foreman Grill, Microwave, stove, etc. for food :)
RP
LV, TX

8) From: Rob Piirainen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Stephen,
                    I'm a novice, there appears to be lots of good ways to
skin this Coffee Roasting Cat the IR2 being one of them, like with most
things there are trade offs and no ultimate anything, at least that's what
years of experience & some engineering & management education has taught me.
Just thought I'd offer up some info on what I'm trying next after 52 roasts
with a Poppery II which I'm keeping around.
Rob P.
The Dreg Drinking Pearl Eating Swine in Laguna Vista, TX

9) From: Lynne Biziewski
Could be a new flavored coffee - don't let Char$s know, or they'll steal
your idea..
 OK, I had the flip side of that concern, i.e. my beans tasteing like steak
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