HomeRoast Digest


Topic: india anohki liberica first impressions (22 msgs / 625 lines)
1) From: Les
First sip of +india anohki liberica has just been taken.  Coffee
rested 27 minutes before grinding and brewing in the TV!  You will get
the blow by blow followed by roasting notes.
First Sip, Blueberry?????  No HUCKLEBERRY!!!!!! Who wants to let me
have their pound!
Second sip more huckleberry with sweetness of honey and such, a bit of
chocolate coming through.  Now chocolate covered dried huckleberry.
Nice intense, low acid clean aftertaste.  I can't believe the body
after only 27 minutes rest.  Now that it is a bit cooler, some of the
earthiness is coming through.  Now that it is a little leatherness in
it, but not in a bad way.  Still huckleberry, but the chocolate has
faded a bit.  It is lukewarm, now and a sweet tobacco is coming
through with still hints of huckleberry and chocolate.  This is a nice
thick coffee, not thin.  You get a nice full mouthfeel, but I am not
getting a real long aftertaste.  There is a very nice sweetness in the
aftertaste.  That cup is all gone, but there is more out in the
Thermal Caraffe!  Well, I will finish this email before splurging some
more.
Ok Roasting notes:
Profile Roaster: RK drum
1 pound roasted
Green coffee had a different look and smell.  My bag had a lot of
peaberries.  I preheated the RK for my normal 7 minutes.
Locked and loaded the RK and started the roast.  The first smells made
me go Whoa! this smells like wacky tabacky!  About two minutes in
still at my first profile setting the smell went to a nice metallic
sweetness, no warm bread or grassy smell in this bean.  At 3 minutes
30 seconds I move the heat to my second position in my profile.  The
smell went to a very nice sassafras smell.  At 5:30 moved to third
setting  The smell moved to a very nice leather oak smell.  At my
third setting this smell moved to a wonderful plum smell and 1st crack
began at 9:30.  I had to move the heat up a bit with this bean.  First
crack ended at 13 minutes.  This was longer than my normal beans.
Most end at 11:30-12 minutes.  The plum continued.  I stopped the
roast at 14:30, no second crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this roast
at a perfect city roast.  This was my target based on Tom's write-up.
Other observations:  A nice looking roast.  My beans varied in color a
lot, but all within good roast colors.    I vacuumed out the Major.
Loaded him up and hit the button for those beautiful 83mm burrs to do
their work.  Bam!  The whole area smelled like I was in the tropical
section of an arboretum.  The earthy barn smell that Tom seemed to
emphasis was there in the grind, but wow what a cornucopia of aroma in
the grind.  Grind color was perfect, just what I wanted!  I loaded up
the Technovirm and it filled the kitchen with wonderful smells of
sweet fruity coffee.  I think I have just experienced the tip of the
iceberg and over the next few days the treat is going to change, but
it will be a treat!  Saturday, I will be pulling shots!  Hey you have
got to try this stuff!  My offer is still there for all you newbies
that may be afraid to roast an $11.00 a pound coffee.  As long as Tom
isn't offering roasted coffee, I will roast it for you if you pay the
shipping to my house and to your house.  If I screw up the roast, I
will reimburse you for the cost of the coffee.
Les

2) From: Rick Copple
Les wrote:
<Snip>
Why do I get the feeling you will "screw up the roast." "Whoops, sorry, 
I'll pay you and keep the coffee!" Yea, I've got you figured out. 
 ;)
I think I'm going to do some popper roast for experimenting, for the 
first half pound. Maybe one at city, city+ and full city. Then the other 
half in the wok probably at a city to city+ so I can taste with more 
rest on it. But this does sound like a fun one.
But I like funky. I love Monsooned Malabar as an SO, and the aged 
Sumatran was good that I had a year or so ago. So I'm thinking I'll be 
wishing I could have more than just one pound of this too.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

3) From: Les
Rick,
Sorry, but my offer is a sincere one, not a ploy to get more of the
good stuff.  An offer I never had when I first started homeroasting 25
years ago before the Internet, but wish I could have had when wanting
someone with experience to roast up some of those expensive beans.
Les
On 9/25/07, Rick Copple  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Jim Gundlach
I just realized I have never tasted a HUCKLEBERRY.  If Harvey is up  
to past performance I may get a chance to try to identify it  
indirectly this afternoon.
       pecan jim
On Sep 25, 2007, at 9:07 PM, Les wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Joseph Robertson
Les,
Linda and I met you at the last PNWG (Pacific Northwest annual gathering)http://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmHome Roasting annual meeting. In was obvious that Rick has never had any
personal contact with you or his post would have read very different. I can
vouch for your sincerity and heart felt desire to help the beginners like
me. If we were not running our new IR2 to it's limit and beyond I would jump
on your offer. I'm sure others from our home roasting group feel similar
about your character and especially your love for coffee and home roasting.
I am very much looking forward to seeing you again but even more I'm looking
forward to owning one of your custom made tampers.
Best Regards,
Joe Robertson
On 9/26/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Larry Johnson
Actually, I think Rick was just making a joke with Les (note the ). It's hard to tell the jokes sometimes when you can't see the other
guy's expression when he says it. I know; I've offended my share of
correspondents by mistake.
My personal "just kidding" symbols:  ;-)  or :-p
On 9/26/07, Joseph Robertson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

7) From: Larry Johnson
Jim, my one experience with huckleberries was that the taste was very
similar to blueberries. Not exactly the same, but similar. I don't remember
the taste well enough to describe the difference, but I remember that that
was my impression at the time (~18 years ago). I hope to refresh my memory
shortly (come on, brown).
On 9/26/07, Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

8) From: Les
OK, I know Rick was giving me a bad time.  We have a good email
relationship, but I didn't want anyone to take his post too serious.
Huckleberries are a type of wild blueberry.  Blueberries on steroids!  So,
this morning I am not only having the wonderful tastes of last night, but at
the mid range in the cool down I am getting some very nice cranberry with a
hint of apricot before it goes into a nice sweet tobacco as before.  Mouth
feel and complexity have increased with 8 hours of rest.  One big problem
with this coffee!  Warning Warning.  My second pot this morning that I took
to work was Idido Misty Valley.  It tastes anemic after having the India
anohki liberica.  I know in my mind that the Idido is an awesome coffee, but
my taste buds needed to have a reboot or something after being assaulted
with all of the flavor from the liberica.
Les
On 9/26/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Rick Copple
Les wrote:
<Snip>
I had no doubt about that. It was a joke, in case the really big grin 
tacked onto the end didn't give it away sufficiently. ;)
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

10) From: Rick Copple
Les wrote:
<Snip>
Yes, and I probably should have made it clearer it was a joke.
In case it isn't obvious, I have the greatest respect for Les. He has 
helped me on more than one occasion, in very practical ways, as I've 
delved into this homeroasting trip. And, we do go back a few years to 
when I started homeroasting, 2004 I think it was. So I do have a pretty 
good idea, though I've yet to meet him face to face, what a great guy he is.
But he left himself wide open for that one and I couldn't help myself. :D
-- 
Rick Copple

11) From: Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-6--61377699
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Well,
     Harvey did not make it to Eastern Alabama in two days, I'm  
crossing my fingers for tomorrow.  Friday we leave for Givhans Ferry  
State Park in South Carolina to attend my niece's wedding.  Would  
like to take some of this coffee with us.
     pecan jim
On Sep 26, 2007, at 9:27 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-6--61377699
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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	charsetO-8859-1
Well,    Harvey did =
not make it to Eastern Alabama in two days, I'm crossing my fingers for =
tomorrow.  Friday we leave for Givhans Ferry State Park in South =
Carolina to attend my niece's wedding.  Would like to take some of =
this coffee with us.    pecan jim
On =
Sep 26, 2007, at 9:27 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
Jim, my = one experience with huckleberries was that the taste was very similar to = blueberries. Not exactly the same, but similar. I don't remember the = taste well enough to describe the difference, but I remember that that = was my impression at the time (~18 years ago). I hope to refresh my = memory shortly (come on, brown). On 9/26/07, Jim = Gundlach <pecanjim> = wrote: I just realized I have never tasted a HUCKLEBERRY.  If Harvey = is up to past performance I may get a chance to try to identify = it indirectly this afternoon.        pecan jim On = Sep 25, 2007, at 9:07 PM, Les wrote: > First sip of +india = anohki liberica has just been taken.  Coffee > rested 27 = minutes before grinding and brewing in the TV!  You will get > = the blow by blow followed by roasting notes. > First Sip, = Blueberry?????  No HUCKLEBERRY!!!!!! Who wants to let me > = have their pound! > Second sip more huckleberry with sweetness of = honey and such, a bit of > chocolate coming through.  Now = chocolate covered dried huckleberry. > Nice intense, low acid = clean aftertaste.  I can't believe the body > after only 27 = minutes rest.  Now that it is a bit cooler, some of the > = earthiness is coming through.  Now that it is a little leatherness = in > it, but not in a bad way.  Still huckleberry, but the = chocolate has > faded a bit.  It is lukewarm, now and a sweet = tobacco is coming > through with still hints of huckleberry and = chocolate.  This is a nice > thick coffee, not thin.  You = get a nice full mouthfeel, but I am not > getting a real long = aftertaste.  There is a very nice sweetness in the > = aftertaste.  That cup is all gone, but there is more out in = the > Thermal Caraffe!  Well, I will finish this email before = splurging some > more. > > Ok Roasting notes: > = Profile Roaster: RK drum > 1 pound roasted > > Green = coffee had a different look and smell.  My bag had a lot of > = peaberries.  I preheated the RK for my normal 7 minutes. = > > Locked and loaded the RK and started the roast.  The = first smells made > me go Whoa! this smells like wacky = tabacky!  About two minutes in > still at my first profile = setting the smell went to a nice metallic > sweetness, no warm = bread or grassy smell in this bean.  At 3 minutes > 30 seconds = I move the heat to my second position in my profile.  The > = smell went to a very nice sassafras smell.  At 5:30 moved to third = > setting  The smell moved to a very nice leather oak = smell.  At my > third setting this smell moved to a wonderful = plum smell and 1st crack > began at 9:30.  I had to move the = heat up a bit with this bean.  First > crack ended at 13 = minutes.  This was longer than my normal beans. > Most end at = 11:30-12 minutes.  The plum continued.  I stopped the > = roast at 14:30, no second crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this roast = > at a perfect city roast.  This was my target based on Tom's = write-up. > > Other observations:  A nice looking = roast.  My beans varied in color a > lot, but all within good = roast colors.    I vacuumed out the Major. > Loaded him = up and hit the button for those beautiful 83mm burrs to do > their = work.  Bam!  The whole area smelled like I was in the = tropical > section of an arboretum.  The earthy barn smell = that Tom seemed to > emphasis was there in the grind, but wow = what a cornucopia of aroma in > the grind.  Grind color was = perfect, just what I wanted!  I loaded up > the Technovirm and = it filled the kitchen with wonderful smells of > sweet fruity = coffee.  I think I have just experienced the tip of the > = iceberg and over the next few days the treat is going to change, = but > it will be a treat!  Saturday, I will be pulling = shots!  Hey you have > got to try this stuff!  My offer = is still there for all you newbies > that may be afraid to roast = an $11.00 a pound coffee.  As long as Tom > isn't offering = roasted coffee, I will roast it for you if you pay the > shipping = to my house and to your house.  If I screw up the roast, I > = will reimburse you for the cost of the coffee. > > = Les > > = homeroast mailing list > http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast > To change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, > = unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/> = maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= homeroast mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings =
-- Larry = J = --Apple-Mail-6--61377699--

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
that's exactly what I was thinking. I have no frame of reference! HELP
tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Les - did you get that feeling with the coffee that you are really 
tasting a different species? it is just so odd ... I mean, it is very 
coffee like in one way and just plain confusing in another --- I 
roasted another 3 samples yesterday afternoon, and eating one of the 
light roast beans I had the distinct flavor impression of eating a 
cocoa nib, i mean, a  fairly light roasted one - Alchemist John, are 
you there?. I need to do some huckleberry research... see if i can 
find some locally.
By the way, eta on Idido Misty Valley is 1 week, and also the BEST DP 
Sidamo of the year, perhaps better than all harars this year, is a 
week out too. It's not the funky Moredocafe we have now ... I think I 
will distinguish it my using the exporters name (Trabocca) in the 
name.
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

14) From: DJ Garcia
Actually I took Rick's post as a very good natured joke. I didn't get =
the
impression he actually thought Les would even think about absconding =
with
the coffee. I am right, Les, right? You wouldn't even think of that, =
right?
Right? Les? Nah, I didn't think so :-).
DJ
Still looking at that bag of Ahnoki ...

15) From: DJ Garcia
And here I thought all this time Huckleberry was a dog [sigh]. So much to
learn, so little time ...
DJ
Living and learning at a VERY sssssloooowwww pace ...

16) From: DJ Garcia
NNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

17) From: Aaron
um... err.  yes...... your vows of stash reduction and all that crap you 
keep feeding yourself as you pretend to take 'control' of this addictive 
behavior... forgit it....  yer in for the long run here bub.
Aaron

18) From: Cameron Forde
We found some Huckleberry tea at Crater Lake (I think that it must
have been at the store in the campground south of the lake) when we
were there in 2004.  It was really good, and I don't think it was just
a case of everything tastes better when camping.  I tried a quick
google but didn't spot the same brand.
Cameron
On 9/26/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

19) From: Les
Tom,
You are right on!  I am so glad that you spoke to the uniqueness of
the bean before I roasted the coffee.  It is a different species!  The
roast smells were all different until getting into first crack.  It
seems that it went through the same stages.  That made roasting easy.
 It is coffee, but it really is different than anything else I have
experienced.  A huckleberry is a wild blueberry.  It is more intense
and rustic.  Huckleberries grown in the Northwest and are abundant in
Montana.  Tom, did you notice a difference in the grind?  It seemed to
me that the beans are much drier when I ground them.  The aroma that
filled the house was outstanding!  The adventure continues tomorrow
morning.  I am excited to see how this bean matures.
Les
On 9/26/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Justin Marquez
A huckleberry is a variant of blueberry, I think.  In the south where I grew
up, they were a wild, small bush with small berries - about 1/4" in diameter
at the most,  but with a fairly intense very near to blueberry flavor.  (My
mom made the BEST cobbler in the entire world using huckleberries and real
cut dumplings, but it took me FOREVER to find and pick enough for a pie.)  I
think they do not produce enough to make it a commercial product when
compared to blueberries.
The first time I saw real blueberries, I thought they were giant
huckleberries and I was really disappointed at the wussy flavor intensity
that the blueberries had. (Did I mention that I grew up in the boonies...?)
So - when someone says "tastes like Huckleberry" you have my full attention.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/26/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Larry Johnson
The ones I had 18-odd years ago were growing along the edge of a field near
the Broad River in Madison County, NE GA, on a dirt road.
Did I mention that I'm descended from hillbillies? We have since worked our
way up to po' white trash.
On 9/27/07, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

22) From: Alchemist John
Yeah, I'm here.  I will have to check a few of the light beans I got 
from Les before brewing and see if I get the cocoa nib thing.  I can 
hardly wait for morning's coffee.  I am going to have to get a 
pound.  Talking to Les, dried huckleberry comes to mind 
actually.  This stuff smells like a dried fruit candy.  Amazing.
At 15:53 9/26/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/


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