HomeRoast Digest


Topic: first taste of India anohki liberica (22 msgs / 710 lines)
1) From: Les
First sip of  India anohki liberica has just been taken.  Coffee
rested 27 minutes before grinding and brewing in the TV!  You will get
the blow by blow followed by roasting notes.
First Sip, Blueberry?????  No HUCKLEBERRY!!!!!! Who wants to let me
have their pound!
Second sip more huckleberry with sweetness of honey and such, a bit of
chocolate coming through.  Now chocolate covered dried huckleberry.
Nice intense, low acid clean aftertaste.  I can't believe the body
after only 27 minutes rest.  Now that it is a bit cooler, some of the
earthiness is coming through.  Now that it is a little leatherness in
it, but not in a bad way.  Still huckleberry, but the chocolate has
faded a bit.  It is lukewarm, now and a sweet tobacco is coming
through with still hints of huckleberry and chocolate.  This is a nice
thick coffee, not thin.  You get a nice full mouthfeel, but I am not
getting a real long aftertaste.  There is a very nice sweetness in the
aftertaste.  That cup is all gone, but there is more out in the
Thermal Caraffe!  Well, I will finish this email before splurging some
more.
Ok Roasting notes:
Profile Roaster: RK drum
1 pound roasted
Green coffee had a different look and smell.  My bag had a lot of
peaberries.  I preheated the RK for my normal 7 minutes.
Locked and loaded the RK and started the roast.  The first smells made
me go Whoa! this smells like wacky tabacky!  About two minutes in
still at my first profile setting the smell went to a nice metallic
sweetness, no warm bread or grassy smell in this bean.  At 3 minutes
30 seconds I move the heat to my second position in my profile.  The
smell went to a very nice sassafras smell.  At 5:30 moved to third
setting  The smell moved to a very nice leather oak smell.  At my
third setting this smell moved to a wonderful plum smell and 1st crack
began at 9:30.  I had to move the heat up a bit with this bean.  First
crack ended at 13 minutes.  This was longer than my normal beans.
Most end at 11:30-12 minutes.  The plum continued.  I stopped the
roast at 14:30, no second crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this roast
at a perfect city roast.  This was my target based on Tom's write-up.
Other observations:  A nice looking roast.  My beans varied in color a
lot, but all within good roast colors.    I vacuumed out the Major.
Loaded him up and hit the button for those beautiful 83mm burrs to do
their work.  Bam!  The whole area smelled like I was in the tropical
section of an arboretum.  The earthy barn smell that Tom seemed to
emphasis was there in the grind, but wow what a cornucopia of aroma in
the grind.  Grind color was perfect, just what I wanted!  I loaded up
the Technovirm and it filled the kitchen with wonderful smells of
sweet fruity coffee.  I think I have just experienced the tip of the
iceberg and over the next few days the treat is going to change, but
it will be a treat!  Saturday, I will be pulling shots!  Hey you have
got to try this stuff!  My offer is still there for all you newbies
that may be afraid to roast an $11.00 a pound coffee.  As long as Tom
isn't offering roasted coffee, I will roast it for you if you pay the
shipping to my house and to your house.  If I screw up the roast, I
will reimburse you for the cost of the coffee.
Les

2) From: Lisa Carton
thanks for a great write-up Les! i wanted to buy some after reading TOm's d=
escription---now i am drooling!!!!
 
 
 
 
 
 
Visit my=
 Blog here:http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com   
----- Original Mes=
sage ----
From: Les 
To: homeroast=
rias.com
Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2007 10:32:50 PM
Subject: +first =
taste of India anohki liberica
First sip of  India anohki liberica =
has just been taken.  Coffee
rested 27 minutes before grinding and brewin=
g in the TV!  You will get
the blow by blow followed by roasting notes.=
First Sip, Blueberry?????  No HUCKLEBERRY!!!!!! Who wants to let me
ha=
ve their pound!
Second sip more huckleberry with sweetness of honey and s=
uch, a bit of
chocolate coming through.  Now chocolate covered dried huck=
leberry.
Nice intense, low acid clean aftertaste.  I can't believe the bo=
dy
after only 27 minutes rest.  Now that it is a bit cooler, some of the=
earthiness is coming through.  Now that it is a little leatherness in
=
it, but not in a bad way.  Still huckleberry, but the chocolate has
faded=
 a bit.  It is lukewarm, now and a sweet tobacco is coming
through with s=
till hints of huckleberry and chocolate.  This is a nice
thick coffee, no=
t thin.  You get a nice full mouthfeel, but I am not
getting a real long =
aftertaste.  There is a very nice sweetness in the
aftertaste.  That cup =
is all gone, but there is more out in the
Thermal Caraffe!  Well, I will =
finish this email before splurging some
more.
Ok Roasting notes:
P=
rofile Roaster: RK drum
1 pound roasted
Green coffee had a different=
 look and smell.  My bag had a lot of
peaberries.  I preheated the RK for=
 my normal 7 minutes.
Locked and loaded the RK and started the roast. =
 The first smells made
me go Whoa! this smells like wacky tabacky!  About=
 two minutes in
still at my first profile setting the smell went to a nic=
e metallic
sweetness, no warm bread or grassy smell in this bean.  At 3 m=
inutes
30 seconds I move the heat to my second position in my profile.  T=
he
smell went to a very nice sassafras smell.  At 5:30 moved to third
s=
etting  The smell moved to a very nice leather oak smell.  At my
third se=
tting this smell moved to a wonderful plum smell and 1st crack
began at 9=
:30.  I had to move the heat up a bit with this bean.  First
crack ended =
at 13 minutes.  This was longer than my normal beans.
Most end at 11:30-1=
2 minutes.  The plum continued.  I stopped the
roast at 14:30, no second =
crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this roast
at a perfect city roast.  This=
 was my target based on Tom's write-up.
Other observations:  A nice lo=
oking roast.  My beans varied in color a
lot, but all within good roast c=
olors.    I vacuumed out the Major.
Loaded him up and hit the button for =
those beautiful 83mm burrs to do
their work.  Bam!  The whole area smelle=
d like I was in the tropical
section of an arboretum.  The earthy barn sm=
ell that Tom seemed to
emphasis was there in the grind, but wow what a co=
rnucopia of aroma in
the grind.  Grind color was perfect, just what I wan=
ted!  I loaded up
the Technovirm and it filled the kitchen with wonderful=
 smells of
sweet fruity coffee.  I think I have just experienced the tip =
of the
iceberg and over the next few days the treat is going to change, b=
ut
it will be a treat!  Saturday, I will be pulling shots!  Hey you have=
got to try this stuff!  My offer is still there for all you newbies
th=
at may be afraid to roast an $11.00 a pound coffee.  As long as Tom
isn't=
 offering roasted coffee, I will roast it for you if you pay the
shipping=
 to my house and to your house.  If I screw up the roast, I
will reimburs=
e you for the cost of the coffee.
Les==
Don't let your dream ride p=
ass you by. Make it a reality with Yahoo! Autos.http://autos.yahoo.com/i=ndex.html
 

3) From: Les
Sorry about the double post.  I thought the first one didn't go
through.  This is one powerful cup!
Les
On 9/26/07, Lisa Carton  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Larry Johnson
Les, I know I can't reproduce your profile exactly, but I would like to try
following the same general curve as your profile. How do your three
positions compare to each other? I'm assuming a relatively low #1, high #2,
somewhat lower #3, but that is all assumption. Even if I'm right, I don't
know how much higher/lower each step is in relation to the others.
Like I said, I know I can't reproduce it (heck, I don't even have a drum
roaster) but I'd just like to try generally following your profile in my own
way.
Thanks,
-- 
Larry J
On 9/25/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Jeff Oien
Isn't City right after first crack ends?
Thanks for the review.
JeffO
On 9/25/07, Les  wrote:
 >> 1st crack
 > > began at 9:30.  I had to move the heat up a bit with this bean.  First
 > > crack ended at 13 minutes.  This was longer than my normal beans.
 > > Most end at 11:30-12 minutes.  The plum continued.  I stopped the
 > > roast at 14:30, no second crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this roast
 > > at a perfect city roast.  This was my target based on Tom's write-up.

6) From: Les
Yes it is Jeff, however with the RK drum you can stretch your roast without
it going darker if you keep the temperature down.  So I put a 90 second
stretch on to try to even out the roast a bit without losing any of the
liveliness of the city roast.   So to answer Larry's question.  I preheat my
drum to 550 degrees.  In the first 3-4 minutes I have the burners at about
3/4 throttle, bringing the heat up to 480 degrees relative to where I have
my heat probe.  I then ramp up at full throttle to about 530.  this takes
2-3 minutes.  I then drop my heat to 1/4 throttle.  1st crack will begin
with the temperature in the drum falling slowly back to the 480 degrees.  I
hold my heat between 480-490 through 1st crack.  On this roast wanting to
stretch 1st out a bit, I dropped the temp to 475 for 90 seconds before
pulling the roast (1/8th throttle.)  I hope this helps.  Temperatures in a
drum move slowly.  It is like piloting a boat.  You don't want to over
steer!
Les
On 9/26/07, Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_172171359==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Les, thank you for the wonderful description and then the very good 
advice.  I like taking what you say and working to convert what I can 
to my little IR2.  It sounds odd, but at times I think I get to what 
you suggest, though I need to convert things for the lack of control 
once I hit "roast."
I come close, I have learned to lengthen roasts by keeping the 
temperature down and not hitting second crack, drawing out the first 
crack, all based on the great things you share.
Again, thank so much for being willing to help us out.
Stephen
At 09:28 AM 9/26/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_172171359==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Les, thank you for the wonderful description and then the
very good advice.  I like taking what you say and working to convert
what I can to my little IR2.  It sounds odd, but at times I think I
get to what you suggest, though I need to convert things for the lack of
control once I hit "roast."
I come close, I have learned to lengthen roasts by keeping the
temperature down and not hitting second crack, drawing out the first
crack, all based on the great things you share.
Again, thank so much for being willing to help us out.
Stephen
At 09:28 AM 9/26/2007, you wrote:
Sorry about the double
post.  I thought the first one didn't go
through.  This is one powerful cup!
Les
On 9/26/07, Lisa Carton <lisajcarton> wrote:
>
>
> thanks for a great write-up Les! i wanted to buy some after reading
TOm's
> description---now i am drooling!!!!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Visit my Blog here:
http://lisabeeen.blogspot.com>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Les <les.albjerg>
> To: homeroast
> Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2007 10:32:50 PM
> Subject: +first taste of India anohki liberica
>
>
> First sip of  India anohki liberica has just been taken. 
Coffee
> rested 27 minutes before grinding and brewing in the TV!  You
will get
> the blow by blow followed by roasting notes.
> First Sip, Blueberry?????  No HUCKLEBERRY!!!!!! Who wants to
let me
> have their pound!
> Second sip more huckleberry with sweetness of honey and such, a bit
of
> chocolate coming through.  Now chocolate covered dried
huckleberry.
> Nice intense, low acid clean aftertaste.  I can't believe the
body
> after only 27 minutes rest.  Now that it is a bit cooler, some
of the
> earthiness is coming through.  Now that it is a little
leatherness in
> it, but not in a bad way.  Still huckleberry, but the chocolate
has
> faded a bit.  It is lukewarm, now and a sweet tobacco is
coming
> through with still hints of huckleberry and chocolate.  This is
a nice
> thick coffee, not thin.  You get a nice full mouthfeel, but I
am not
> getting a real long aftertaste.  There is a very nice sweetness
in the
> aftertaste.  That cup is all gone, but there is more out in
the
> Thermal Caraffe!  Well, I will finish this email before
splurging some
> more.
>
> Ok Roasting notes:
> Profile Roaster: RK drum
> 1 pound roasted
>
> Green coffee had a different look and smell.  My bag had a lot
of
> peaberries.  I preheated the RK for my normal 7 minutes.
>
> Locked and loaded the RK and started the roast.  The first
smells made
> me go Whoa! this smells like wacky tabacky!  About two minutes
in
> still at my first profile setting the smell went to a nice
metallic
> sweetness, no warm bread or grassy smell in this bean.  At 3
minutes
> 30 seconds I move the heat to my second position in my
profile.  The
> smell went to a very nice sassafras smell.  At 5:30 moved to
third
> setting  The smell moved to a very nice leather oak
smell.  At my
> third setting this smell moved to a wonderful plum smell and 1st
crack
> began at 9:30.  I had to move the heat up a bit with this
bean.  First
> crack ended at 13 minutes.  This was longer than my normal
beans.
> Most end at 11:30-12 minutes.  The plum continued.  I
stopped the
> roast at 14:30, no second crack.  In my opinion, I nailed this
roast
> at a perfect city roast.  This was my target based on Tom's
write-up.
>
> Other observations:  A nice looking roast.  My beans
varied in color a
> lot, but all within good roast colors.    I vacuumed
out the Major.
> Loaded him up and hit the button for those beautiful 83mm burrs to
do
> their work.  Bam!  The whole area smelled like I was in
the tropical
> section of an arboretum.  The earthy barn smell that Tom seemed
to
> emphasis was there in the grind, but wow what a cornucopia of aroma
in
> the grind.  Grind color was perfect, just what I wanted! 
I loaded up
> the Technovirm and it filled the kitchen with wonderful smells
of
> sweet fruity coffee.  I think I have just experienced the tip
of the
> iceberg and over the next few days the treat is going to change,
but
> it will be a treat!  Saturday, I will be pulling shots! 
Hey you have
> got to try this stuff!  My offer is still there for all you
newbies
> that may be afraid to roast an $11.00 a pound coffee.  As long
as Tom
> isn't offering roasted coffee, I will roast it for you if you pay
the
> shipping to my house and to your house.  If I screw up the
roast, I
> will reimburse you for the cost of the coffee.
>
> Les
>
> homeroast mailing list
>
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast> To change your personal list settings (digest options,
vacations,
> unsvbscribes) go to
>
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>
> 
> Don't let your dream ride pass you by. Make it a reality with Yahoo!
Autos.
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_172171359==.ALT--

8) From: Justin Marquez
Les - As an occasional RK drummer, I appreciate your clear description!  A
couple of questions... what is the batch size you are using that goes with
these times? Are you using a thermocouple or a bi-met thermometer to monitor
temps?
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/26/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Les
I roasted the whole pound.  I am using the K-Probe that I bought from Tom.
It is even with the middle of the drum in my Charbroil 35k BBQ.
Les
On 9/27/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Justin Marquez
Les - After preheating the drum, how do you put the beans in?  Do you just
"open the flap" with the drum mounted and funnel 'em in or do you actually
take it out of the grill?
I have avoided preheating the drum because I am not sure I can get the beans
loaded safely. (I am a real klutz.) I have been preheating the grill but not
the drum, so it takes me little longer to roast a pound. I have thought that
preheating might be good, but am reluctant.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/27/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Homeroaster
I found no benefit to preheating the drum.  I even built an elaborate 
thingamajig to funnel the beans into the open end of the drum.  My drums use 
a cone end that has an opening.  I don't use the funnel any more.  Not 
necessary in my opinion.
The funnel contraption I built...http://www.homeroaster.com/beanhop.jpg*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

12) From: W. Simon
I personally pull the drum, open the flap and funnel them in with my hands.
When I roast, I usually do 3 separate loads.  I weigh them all out in the
house and carry them to the grill in bowls.  I make my hands an extension of
the bowl and pour them in.  I may have dropped one or two beans in well over
a year of doing it that way.
Last night's roast included 2 lbs of Harrar Horse Lot #30.  I have about 2
lbs. of it left.
The jury is out as far as pre-heating the drum.
Wes
On 9/27/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: DJ Garcia
Ed, that's quite a contraption! :-)
In my case with the HotTop, I actually use the pre-heat temperature to =
vary
my profile. Loading at 260 gives me a somewhat different roast than say =
167
(HotTop default) or 300, because of the inertia inherent in the roaster.
DJ
Clueless but happily about to roast some Ahnoki ...

14) From: Homeroaster
The profile with the preheated drum did not work as well as preheating the 
roaster to about 350F and adding the beans in a cold drum, and letting the 
bean temperature chase the roaster temperature to about 470F and then level 
out.
The funnel actually allowed me to add the beans as the drum was turning. 
Very cool idea but it didn't make better beans!
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

15) From: Michael Rasmussen
We had to try this stuff. 
Roasted yesterday afternoon in a Variac controlled popper.  The bean seemed
very dense - I had to spend more time than usual assisting the fan in keeping
bean movement up.  Lots of chaff and a very uneven colors at roast finish.  
Two batches, one City+ and Full City as measured by bean mass temperature. 
The main aromas are the blue fruit, though I also pick up some star and jack
fruit smells.  No cowpies, but there's an undertone of the composting, rotting
smell that prevails in the tropics - which for me means Indonesia/Bali/Mexico. 
When brewing the (FC roast) coffee a mushroom, fungal smell emerged, though the fruit
stayed predominant.  
Fifteen minutes later the cup still maintains the fruity aroma and flavor.  
I'm really wishing I had some fresh durian for reference.  
I'm going to make up some of the City+ (too light for my wife's taste) for
myself later.  
This won't be an everyday coffee around here.  It's ... interesting.  Maybe
even an aquired taste.  
-- 
      Michael Rasmussen, Portland Oregon  
    Be appropriate && Follow your curiosity
         http://www.patch.com/words/
  The fortune cookie says:
James Joyce -- an essentially private man who wished his total
indifference to public notice to be universally recognized.
		-- Tom Stoppard

16) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
it really changes with rest, like 5 days or so. I roasted up 10 lbs 
and offered 1/2 lb bags of it to everyone at the 10th anniversary 
party. It was a probat roast, 14 minutes, C+, dropping the temp at 
the end, finishing at 428 reading (k probe into the bean mass, bean 
surface temp). then we rested it 5 days before the party, t let the 
flavors stabilize. the fruit / berry is still there, but some of the 
flavors you describe as mushroom are more muted and a neat anise 
flavor emerges. light roasts of anohki are much bolder than darker 
roasts, too.
tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

17) From: Michael Wade
I've only roasted one batch so far, to City +.  Very uneven appearance, some 
beans distinctly bright green in color.   Hmmm, I've seen that color 
before...
Spent my early years on a dairy/cattle ranch in Wyoming; very familar aroma 
from freshly ground beans.  Ground fine, brewed in FP 3 min., pour through 
Mellita filter.  Flavor INTENSE!  Reminds me of the smell of better cigar 
tobacco (or what I'm told is better, I wouldn't really know).
Acquiring a taste for it, but not in mixed company.  Mary doesn't share my 
enthusiasm.
Tried blending it with C++ Misty Valley @1:1,  interesting combination, lots 
of little flavor bursts battling it out in there, will try again.
Now sipping on Liberica/Java Pancoer C+ @1:2.  Big mouthfeel, funny little 
sweet aftertaste, pretty nice cup.  I could drink this often.
I guess the bottom line is I ordered another pound this morning,
Michael Wade

18) From: Aaron Scholten
I have to pipe in again on this one.  I have some that has rested oh 
probably 3 weeks now... or however long it has been since I made my 
original comment on it's flavor.
The fruit smell is as intense as ever and even just a 10 percent blend 
of this with 90 of anything else, the fruit flavors stand out boldly.  
Why the blend you ask... simple, i ran out of my regular coffee, had 9.2 
grams and needed another gram or so to make a full cup of coffee in my 
swiss gold... it was there, I used it....
even after sitting that long the flavors are still as intense as ever 
and it shows no signs of aging, rancidness etc etc...
aaron

19) From: Floyd Lozano
I wish I had the opportunity to have your version.  My version, the wife
would not let me keep - I had to pitch the entire 1lb batch.  This is one
coffee that must have a razor thin sweet spot and I didn't find it.  You
should maybe offer a special edition roastmaster's choice 1/2 lb preroasted
along with one of your weekly offerings, i'd be all over it.
-F
On 11/4/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Aaron Scholten
Sounds to me like you should pitch the wife instead.  Throwing away 
coffee is blasphemous.  Arghhhhhh!!!
Aaron

21) From: Floyd Lozano
Throwing bad coffee away is not sin, it is mercy ;)
On Nov 7, 2007 5:49 AM, Aaron Scholten  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Les
I agree Floyd!  Too bad you missed the roast.  The anohki liberica is one
fantastic coffee.  However if you coffee pleasure is restricted to a
pleasant ride in the country experience, going down the drag strip in a
funny car, might not be your cup of coffee!  "Well dear it looks like a
Chevy Malibu!"
Les
On 11/7/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest