HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A thoroughly unpleasant experience (5 msgs / 151 lines)
1) From: Kris McN
I finally got around to roasting the pound of crap coffee that Tom offers
for educational purposes.  In this case it's a Vietnamese Robusta that Tom
described as, "truckstop flavor!"  I've had it in my stash for quite awhile
now, and I thought I should finally take the plunge.  Really, really, foul
from beginning to end!  First, just the smell of the "green" beans
themselves (many weren't green, but more of a brown and some kinda black),
musty, sour, just plain yucky.  As the beans were roasting, I was hestitant
to  put my head over the bread machine to smell what was going on.  I swear
at one point, just before 2nd, it smelled strongly of turpentine.  I took
the beans a little darker than I usually go, into a rolling 2nd, to mimic
that "dark-roast, full-bodied" experience so many crap coffees try to sell
you.  Even the beans resting in an open container in my kitchen for a couple
of hours post-roast smelled bad.  Usually I love how resting beans fill my
kitchen with coffee smell, it's such a comforting homey smell, but in this
case all evening long I'd look around to see what stinks like mildew before
I'd realize it was those darn beans.   This morning, the grind smelled
straight out of a cheap can (or, honestly, remniscent of $*, not to pile
on).  The cup itself smells burnt and bitter and like a bad, greasy-spoon
diner.  I'm realizing that the smell of a bad greasy-spoon (as apposed to a
diamond-in-the-rough greasy spoon) that I've always attributed to that
lingering smell of old cigarettes and ashtrays in need of emptying may
really have been the smell of the bad coffee being served all along!  That's
just what this cup smells and tastes like - stale cigarettes.  Bitter, stale
cigarettes that have molded a bit.  Bleh.
As balm for the homeroaster soul, I also roasted up a batch of "mystery
bean" I'd had in my stash for awhile.  The tag fell off at some point, so I
have no idea what it is.  It's obviously some dry-processed something,
probably East African.  Aaaaah, fruited, malty, smooth, and delightful!
Lesson learned.
Kris McN

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Your experience paralleled mine. Let me know the contact information for the
hazmat company you find to dispose of your Vietnamese Disgusta. I STILL have
1/4# of the stuff hermetically double sealed from the very first UGH!
offering and can't find a suitable safe local method of disposal. At one
point was going to be sent to be incinerated but they shut down Trojan and
Hanford wouldn't accept it.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Kris McN
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2007 10:25 AM
I finally got around to roasting the pound of crap coffee that Tom offers
for educational purposes.  In this case it's a Vietnamese Robusta that Tom
described as, "truckstop flavor!"  I've had it in my stash for quite awhile
now, and I thought I should finally take the plunge.  Really, really, foul
from beginning to end!  First, just the smell of the "green" beans
themselves (many weren't green, but more of a brown and some kinda black),
musty, sour, just plain yucky.  As the beans were roasting, I was hestitant
to  put my head over the bread machine to smell what was going on.  I swear
at one point, just before 2nd, it smelled strongly of turpentine.  I took
the beans a little darker than I usually go, into a rolling 2nd, to mimic
that "dark-roast, full-bodied" experience so many crap coffees try to sell
you.  Even the beans resting in an open container in my kitchen for a couple
of hours post-roast smelled bad.  Usually I love how resting beans fill my
kitchen with coffee smell, it's such a comforting homey smell, but in this
case all evening long I'd look around to see what stinks like mildew before
I'd realize it was those darn beans.   This morning, the grind smelled
straight out of a cheap can (or, honestly, remniscent of $*, not to pile
on).  The cup itself smells burnt and bitter and like a bad, greasy-spoon
diner.  I'm realizing that the smell of a bad greasy-spoon (as apposed to a
diamond-in-the-rough greasy spoon) that I've always attributed to that
lingering smell of old cigarettes and ashtrays in need of emptying may
really have been the smell of the bad coffee being served all along!  That's
just what this cup smells and tastes like - stale cigarettes.  Bitter, stale
cigarettes that have molded a bit.  Bleh. 
As balm for the homeroaster soul, I also roasted up a batch of "mystery
bean" I'd had in my stash for awhile.  The tag fell off at some point, so I
have no idea what it is.  It's obviously some dry-processed something,
probably East African.  Aaaaah, fruited, malty, smooth, and delightful! 
Lesson learned.
Kris McN

3) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
I didn't think you were actually suppose to drink the stuff. I thought it
was to show a 'bad' roasting experience then into file 13.
Glad I didn't order any...Thanks for the low down.
TerryT
On 9/27/07, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

4) From: Kris McN
In for a penny, in for a pound.  I couldn't go all that way and not a least
taste it.  Never again, however.
You're right, Mike, Hanford would've been the place for these beans!  I
ended up tossing them into my compost pile.  I figure there's enough chicken
poop in there that they'll feel right at home.
Kris McN

5) From: Rick Copple
TERRY TITSWORTH wrote:
<Snip>
I guess it does give you the bad experience, but I think mainly what Tom 
sells them for (aside from letting you get a whiff of what he is saving 
us from by tasting all these for us to find the best) is so new home 
roasters can use them for getting the full experience of roasting beans 
without feeling bad about destroying "good" beans. You can go all the 
way to third crack with these babies (probably want to wear a gas mask, 
though) just to experience the change in colors, hear the snaps and 
crackles and the wonderful smells of home roast, and watch it go up in 
flames as it goes beyond third crack. What fun!
But, it's suppose to give you some practice beans for learning to roast, 
probably would be good if you are going to do some wok roasting as that 
usually takes a few tries to get the feel for it.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/


HomeRoast Digest