HomeRoast Digest


Topic: India Anohki (14 msgs / 432 lines)
1) From: Warren&Carolyn
I roasted it this morning (to full city, in a popcorn popper) and it was 
quite overwhelming- wonderful, but very different. Specifically, the 
fruitiness was very strong- never tried huckleberries, but you coudl not 
miss the blueberries- or the wildness, which was more appealing as the 
cup cooled.
I really like what the green beans smelled like, and that did remind me, 
of all things, of the smell in the coffee growing areas of the Big 
Island. It was somehow a much stronger "coffee" smell than other coffees.
In the summer of 1990 I had a cup of so-called "Indian" coffee at a  
caf in Edinburgh near the George IV bridge that had an unforgettable 
taste- this reminded me of that taste, but it has been too long to be 
sure that my memory is correct.  I really can't believe they got their 
hands on Liberica beans. A few days later I went to the same caf I and 
ordered a "Kenya"- and they served me this same "Indian" coffee. I said 
"your labels are mixed up-this is the Indian"- and the server-who I 
gathered was a college student making some money during Festival season- 
tasted it and agreed. I  higly doubt the server was any sort of coffee 
expert, so it was interesting that they knew immediately which coffee it 
was as well!
I liked this enough that if Tom stocks it again I would buy it. I am 
very curious to try it out on friends. I also look forward to seeing how 
it changes over the next few days.
Warren
www.musicanovaaz.org

2) From: homeroast
Since I don't know a thing about Liberica beans, I'm looking for 
suggested profiles for this bean. Fast, aggressive, high temp race to 
first? Or a much slower crawl there? I'm inclined to use a slower 
profile, trying to hit first about 13 min and second at 15. But, I have 
no idea. It's arriving tomorrow and I want to be ready. I'm using a Gene 
Cafe.
I don't want to attack this bean in the roaster I'm building, but I'll 
have more on that later... Here's the goal: Heat on to warm the basket, 
add beans, motor on, roast, heat off, cool in 60 seconds and evacuate 
the chaff, dump & rest.. If that doesn't work, I can always use a heat 
gun in the bloody thing... I hope to roast 2 pounds with it but will be 
happy roasting 1.
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

3) From: homeroast
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No, No, No!  Your inclination is wrong.  This bean needs to be ramped up
fast.  You want to ramp up fast and then hold the temp down some and stretch
out 1st crack.  If you don't want the "barnyard" stay out of second crack
and let it rest for at least 5 days.  Full city plus is the perfect
roast. The Liberica roasts hotter than other beans.  I roast it 15 degrees
hotter than my normal profiles.   I have not roasted with a Genie, so I am
hoping Eddie will jump in here.  This is a hard (as in hard vs soft) bean.
I hit first crack at 9:30 minutes in the RK and ended the roast at 14:30.  I
would also recommend that you roast up nice Dry Processed coffee.  The new
DP Brazil  looks real good, and blend the Liberica at 10-20 percent.  The
blend I did with the Bali at 20% was simply stunning.  I had nice blueberry
with a lot of caramel and fruit.  It makes an awesome fruit-bomb espresso!
I like it straight too, but it is intense.
Les
On Jan 17, 2008 5:47 PM, John Despres 
wrote:
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No, No, No!  Your inclination is wrong.  This bean needs to =
be ramped up fast.  You want to ramp up fast and then hold the temp do=
wn some and stretch out 1st crack.  If you don't want the "ba=
rnyard" stay out of second crack and let it rest for at least 5 days.&=
nbsp; Full city plus is the perfect roast. The Liberica roasts hotter =
than other beans.  I roast it 15 degrees hotter than my normal pr=
ofiles.   I have not roasted with a Genie, so I am hoping Eddie w=
ill jump in here.  This is a hard (as in hard vs soft) bean. =
; I hit first crack at 9:30 minutes in the RK and ended the roast at 14:30.=
  I would also recommend that you roast up nice Dry Processed coffee.&=
nbsp; The new DP Brazil  looks real good, and blend the Liberica at 10=
-20 percent.  The blend I did with the Bali at 20% was simply stunning=
.  I had nice blueberry with a lot of caramel and fruit.  It make=
s an awesome fruit-bomb espresso!  I like it straight too, but it is i=
ntense.
 
Les
On Jan 17, 2008 5:47 PM, John Despres <john<=
/a>> wrote:
Since I don't know a thing a=
bout Liberica beans, I'm looking for
suggested profiles for this bea=
n. Fast, aggressive, high temp race to
first? Or a much slower crawl there? I'm inclined to use a slowerprofile, trying to hit first about 13 min and second at 15. But, I haveno idea. It's arriving tomorrow and I want to be ready. I'm using=
 a Gene
Cafe.
I don't want to attack this bean in the roaster I'=
m building, but I'll
have more on that later... Here's the goal:=
 Heat on to warm the basket,
add beans, motor on, roast, heat off, cool =
in 60 seconds and evacuate
the chaff, dump & rest.. If that doesn't work, I can always use=
 a heat
gun in the bloody thing... I hope to roast 2 pounds with it but =
will be
happy roasting 1.
--
John A C Despres
Hug your =
kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions <http://www.sceneitallproducti=ons.com/>
JD's Coffee Provoked Ramblings
<http://jdscoffeeprovokedramblings.blogspot.com/>=homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change yo=
ur personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to <=
a href="http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings"target=
="_blank">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings------=_Part_3459_6977834.1200630794515--

4) From: homeroast
I second what Les said-on every point. The only thing I would add is 
that Liberica does not really react the way other beans do in that light 
roasts-city- give the least amount of the potentially off-setting 
"barnyard" flavors. So if you err, err on the side of too light.
Also, do try it on several different days, as the changes in taste are 
very pronounced from one day to the next. I actually like the wild 
"extreme blueberry" you get on the first few days. After a few days it 
is less eccentric.
Warren

5) From: homeroast
I let mine rest for a good month before it tamed down to a drinkable 
level.  Overpoweringly fruity,  funk for the first week or so, but it 
finally settled down.
Not a bad bean really, just not something that id drink straight.     It 
is very potent in it's flavorability.  I found that as little as a ten 
percent blend of it with anything else and you can still very 
distinctively taste the anoki in your cup.
Aaron

6) From: homeroast
Thanks, Les. I didn't realize this was a hard bean... I think I got it 
in my head that it was a softer bean. Never mind - Thank you for your 
insight! One area of your advice I will choose to step around is the 
resting. Every new bean I roast, I brew a small French Press daily. 
Since I'm fairly new at this, it's a great way to learn the development 
of the roasts over time. I just wanna be smarter!
Thanks again, Les. It's fun to be part of this group.
John
Les wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

7) From: homeroast
John,
I enjoy this bean after I roast it, but you want to save some for that
5 plus day when it has smoothed out.
Les
On 1/18/08, John Despres  wrote:
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8) From: homeroast
Les,
I do so appreciate the compliment, but I think John is quickly
surpassing my roasting expertise with the Gene Cafe.
Given Les' suggestions, Tom's notes and the fact that the India Anohki
Liberica is a hard bean, I would probably do the 300F warming phase
for 5 minutes and then crank it up to 482F, until the first "rifle
shot" of 1st crack, then dial the heat back to 456F for the remainder
(based on Tom's note of "longer roast time helps moderate medicinal
tones in the darker roasts").  Pull and cool well before 2nd crack;
right after the aroma sharpens a bit, which may be about a minute or
so after the end of 1st crack.  This should yield a really nice,
solid, City+ roast, as described in Tom's "An Updated Pictorial Guide
to the Roast Process."
Located here:  <http://www.sweetmarias.com/roasting-VisualGuideV2.html>
For my idea of Full City, push it just a bit further, when the aroma
sharpens again and becomes a bit more pungent with the accompaniment
of some smoke.  Pull and cool quickly to keep it out of second crack.
I hope everyone has a fantastic weekend!
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Stop telling God how big your storm is.
Instead, tell the storm how big your God is.
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Jan 17, 2008 10:33 PM, Les  wrote:
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9) From: homeroast
Les, I will definately stretch out the first batch and track the changes 
in my tasting notes. After that, I'll roast & rest to my favorite flavor.
John
Les wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

10) From: homeroast
Les, I'm re-reading your pot - I haven't tried blends yet as I'm still 
learning flavors of S.O. beans. Your suggestions sound great and I have 
some good DP coffee and the Bali to try it with, but which way do the 
percentages go? Is the Liberica the 10-20% or the other? So would it be 
DP at 80% and the Liberica at 20%?
Thanks for all your help. I greatly appreciate it.
John
Les wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

11) From: homeroast
Gee, Thanks, Eddie! That's a very nice complement. I'll take that to the 
bank!
I don't know if I'm surpassing anyone, though. I'll have an idea when I 
get a sample back from you to compare to my own roasts. In all honesty, 
I think I was extremely lucky at the start. I had no idea about what I 
was doing, and being fearless, kept at it until certain concepts began 
to settle in my brain. At that point I was able to ask somewhat cogent 
questions, which Mr. Dove was most gracious to help me out with. It's 
true, I'm roasting some very yummy stuff here, but finding the flavors 
and learning how to decipher them is next. Determining that specific 
roast that creates that specific flavor or specific flavors is the more 
difficult part. Then duplicating... well, that's next I suppose.
Until today, I've never thrown out a batch of beans - I'm building a 
roaster and this afternoon I baked one pound, burned another by dropping 
my heat source into the beans (man, does that stink) and the third was a 
remarkably ugly melange. I'll brew that one, but the others are compost 
material.
I started lucky and learned a lot along the way. This list has been a 
huge help to me. Thank you all!
John
Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

12) From: homeroast
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You want to post-roast blend.  So if you use a coffee scoop, scoop out 8
scoops of a nice DP and put it in with 2 scoops of anokha and blend them
good, grind, brew, and enjoy.
Les
On Jan 18, 2008 5:30 PM, John Despres 
wrote:
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You want to post-roast blend.  So if you use a coffee scoop, scoop out 8 scoops of a nice DP and put it in with 2 scoops of anokha and blend them good, grind, brew, and enjoy.
 
Les
On Jan 18, 2008 5:30 PM, John Despres <john> wrote:
Les, I'm re-reading your pot - I haven't tried blends yet as I'm still
learning flavors of 
S.O. beans. Your suggestions sound great and I have
some good DP coffee and the Bali to try it with, but which way do the
percentages go? Is the Liberica the 10-20% or the other? So would it be
DP at 80% and the Liberica at 20%?
ou
Thanks for all your help. I greatly appreciate it.
John
Les wrote:
> No, No, No! Your inclination is wrong. This bean needs to be ramped up
> fast. You want to ramp up fast and then hold the temp down some and
> stretch out 1st crack. If you don't want the "barnyard" stay out of
> second crack and let it rest for at least 5 days. Full city plus is
> the perfect roast. The Liberica roasts hotter than other beans. I
> roast it 15 degrees hotter than my normal profiles. I have not roasted
> with a Genie, so I am hoping Eddie will jump in here. This is a hard
> (as in hard vs soft) bean. I hit first crack at 9:30 minutes in the RK
> and ended the roast at 14:30. I would also recommend that you roast up
> nice Dry Processed coffee. The new DP Brazil looks real good, and
> blend the Liberica at 10-20 percent. The blend I did with the Bali at
> 20% was simply stunning. I had nice blueberry with a lot of caramel
> and fruit. It makes an awesome fruit-bomb espresso! I like it straight
> too, but it is intense.
> Les
>
> On Jan 17, 2008 5:47 PM, John Despres <
john
> <mailto:john>> wrote:
>
>     Since I don't know a thing about Liberica beans, I'm looking for
>     suggested profiles for this bean. Fast, aggressive, high temp race to
>     first? Or a much slower crawl there? I'm inclined to use a slower
>     profile, trying to hit first about 13 min and second at 15. But, I
>     have
>     no idea. It's arriving tomorrow and I want to be ready. I'm using
>     a Gene
>     Cafe.
>
>     I don't want to attack this bean in the roaster I'm building, but I'll
>     have more on that later... Here's the goal: Heat on to warm the
>     basket,
>     add beans, motor on, roast, heat off, cool in 60 seconds and evacuate
>     the chaff, dump & rest.. If that doesn't work, I can always use a heat
>     gun in the bloody thing... I hope to roast 2 pounds with it but
>     will be
>     happy roasting 1.
>     --
>
>     John A C Despres
>
>     Hug your kids
>
>     616.437.9182
>     Scene It All Productions <http://www.sceneitallproductions.com/>>
>     JD's Coffee Provoked Ramblings
>     < http://jdscoffeeprovokedramblings.blogspot.com/>>
>
>    
>     homeroast mailing list
>     http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast>     To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
>     unsvbscribes) go to
>     http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>
>
--
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions <http://www.sceneitallproductions.com/>JD's Coffee Provoked Ramblings
<http://jdscoffeeprovokedramblings.blogspot.com/>homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to 
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings------=_Part_7242_640473.1200709471835--

13) From: homeroast
Got it! Thanks, Les.
Les wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

14) From: homeroast
I don't believe it is a very dense bean. I roast it with a fairly 
standard curve, and slow down the roast at the end to target my exact 
desired DOR (degree of roast). I have had good cups with the FC 
roast, even a bit of second. I have had good cups with just 24 rest 
too, but it certainly changes after 5 days or so. The point is, it's 
worth trying all along the way, keeping in mind that the flavors 
shift a LOT on this coffee. Our older roasts became very herbal and 
anise/licorice flavored, whereas 24-48 hours was very berryish, 
fruited. It also changes as it cools in the cup. I think I scared so 
many people off of the Anohki experience with my "barnyard and 
blueberries" description that the lot has lasted longer than I 
thought. But unlike a lot of coffees we stock, it has improved over 
time (the only other lots like this are the Monsooned ones, some 
Robusta, and of course the intentional Aged coffees).
Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com


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