HomeRoast Digest


Topic: FP Travel (23 msgs / 843 lines)
1) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Joe - plastic beakers for french press... I just don't like them. I 
guess my bias is that they scuff and scratch, are difficult to get 
truly clean  when the surface is abraded, and that glass is just 
better ... Then, like a hypocrite, i use the aeropress. Do you who 
have plastic (okay, polycarbonate) french press beakers really like 
them? I think it is better to buy a whole new low-end bodum press for 
travel, rather than replace the glass beaker in the nicer presses 
with a plastic one ...
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

2) From: Les
Tom,
My wife gave me a wonderful French Press from Tupperware.  It is European
Tupperware.  It has a glass carafe surrounded by  a nice clear plastic.
What I really like is it has a floating insulated washer that floats on top
of the hot coffee.  It really does keep the coffee nice an hot as well as
protect the glass carafe.  I sure wish they were more available here.
Les
On 10/2/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
A tupperware french press ... wow, going to have to google that!
Tom
Tom,
My wife gave me a wonderful French Press from Tupperware.  It is 
European Tupperware.  It has a glass carafe surrounded by  a nice 
clear plastic.  What I really like is it has a floating insulated 
washer that floats on top of the hot coffee.  It really does keep the 
coffee nice an hot as well as protect the glass carafe.  I sure wish 
they were more available here.
Les
On 10/2/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
<sweetmarias> 
wrote:
Joe - plastic beakers for french press... I just don't like them. I
guess my bias is that they scuff and scratch, are difficult to get
truly clean  when the surface is abraded, and that glass is just
better ... Then, like a hypocrite, i use the aeropress. Do you who
have plastic (okay, polycarbonate) french press beakers really like
them? I think it is better to buy a whole new low-end bodum press for
travel, rather than replace the glass beaker in the nicer presses
with a plastic one ...
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

4) From: Sandy Andina
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I do not notice any flavor difference with the polycarbonate beakers-- 
in fact, they taste better than the stainless steel thermal press  
mugs (which are dribble cups anyway). Never had them scratch--I rinse  
them in hot water and use a dishcloth, never put them in the  
dishwasher (I have polycarb drinking glasses and despite mfr. claims,  
they can chip or even crack when handled roughly--though not scratch.  
However, cheaper clear acrylic can "etch" in the dishwasher).  It's  
not a matter of losing the use of a glass FP when it shatters--it's  
the major PITA of having to get glass fragments out of your clothes  
and possibly even having to discard them.  I would NEVER pack glass  
or ceramic in checked bags if flying--the risk is just too great.   
Remember, I even had a glass FP beaker shatter in a cloth tote when I  
traveled by car.
On Oct 2, 2007, at 3:53 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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I do not notice any flavor difference with the polycarbonate beakers--in =
fact, they taste better than the stainless steel thermal press mugs =
(which are dribble cups anyway). Never had them scratch--I rinse them in =
hot water and use a dishcloth, never put them in the dishwasher (I have =
polycarb drinking glasses and despite mfr. claims, they can chip or even =
crack when handled roughly--though not scratch. However, cheaper clear =
acrylic can "etch" in the dishwasher).  It's not a matter of losing =
the use of a glass FP when it shatters--it's the major PITA of having to =
get glass fragments out of your clothes and possibly even having to =
discard them.  I would NEVER pack glass or ceramic in checked bags if =
flying--the risk is just too great.  Remember, I even had a glass FP =
beaker shatter in a cloth tote when I traveled by car.
On =
Oct 2, 2007, at 3:53 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee =
wrote:
Joe - plastic beakers for french = press... I just don't like them. I guess my bias is that they scuff and = scratch, are difficult to get truly clean  when the surface is abraded, = and that glass is just better ... Then, like a hypocrite, i use the = aeropress. Do you who have plastic (okay, polycarbonate) french press = beakers really like them? I think it is better to buy a whole new = low-end bodum press for travel, rather than replace the glass beaker in = the nicer presses with a plastic one ... Tom--                   = "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"       =     Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria        =               http://www.sweetmarias.com      =         Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com    Sweet Maria's Coffee - = 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA            = phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-44-455743508--

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
The lower end Bodum Brazil polycarbonate beakered I got for travel a number
of years ago came with a totally different one piece plunger with soft
silicone outer edge, doesn't scratch the poly. Don't know if they still come
with this plunger or the usual multipiece SS.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

6) From: Sandy Andina
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Mine came with that scratchless plunger.
On Oct 2, 2007, at 6:58 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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Mine came with that scratchless =
plunger.
On Oct 2, 2007, at 6:58 PM, miKe mcKoffee =
wrote:
The lower end Bodum Brazil = polycarbonate beakered I got for travel a numberof years ago came with a totally different one piece = plunger with softsilicone outer edge, doesn't = scratch the poly. Don't know if they still comewith this plunger or the usual multipiece = SS. Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.ne=t/~mckona/PNWGVI.htm Kona Konnaisseur miKe = mcKoffeewww.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes = etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimatelythe quest for Koffee Nirvana is a = solitary path. To know I mustfirst not = know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal = enlightenmentfound exploring the many = divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before. Sweet = Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/  From: homeroast-admin= s.sweetmarias.com [mailto:homeroast-adm= in] On Behalf Of Tom = & Maria - Sweet Maria's CoffeeSent: = Tuesday, October 02, 2007 1:54 PM Joe - plastic beakers for french = press... I just don't like them. I guess my = bias is that they scuff and scratch, are difficult to get truly = clean  when the surface = is abraded, and that glass is just better = ... Then, like a hypocrite, i use the aeropress. Do you who have = plastic (okay, polycarbonate) french press beakers really like them? I = think it is better to buy a whole new low-end bodum press for travel, = rather than replace the glass beaker in the nicer presses with a = plastic one ... Tom homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-47-467815702--

7) From: Kevin Creason
I have a stainless steel Thermos (Nissan) brand press that use quite 
regularly at home as well as tote it to my study group to make fresh 
coffe, tote it camping....
It's fantastic, and I'm not just saying that as a reformed Delorean 
owner who still loves the looks of bare stainless steel.
It has a plastic handle and base, and lid, but has been holding up for a 
year now and I still love it. Keeps coffee hot enough for an hour, 
though the metal could possibly start to effect the taste by then, but 
not as much it cooling down in a glass or plastic beaker.
(I haven't read all the replies on the subject, I apologize if someone 
else has already mentioned this great product)
-Kevin

8) From: stereoplegic
note on the silicone "scratchless" plunger: make sure the hole in the 
lid through which the plunger goes is narrow enough to allow the plunger 
to depress w/ as little horizontal movement as possible. my plastic 
FP/tumbler has a very wide opening, so many course grounds as well as 
fines get through the side silicone lining around the plunger if i don't 
make absolutely sure i'm pressing straight down.
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Sandy Andina
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That's why I stopped using a Bodum clear acrylic FP travel cup--the  
plunger wiggled too much and sometimes would even separate and plunge  
through the center of the screen, leaving the screen suspended  
halfway down. The Nissan and Starbucks stainless thermals work better  
but impart a metal taste to the coffee as it cools. There's a "boot"  
shaped 20-oz. press (colored enameled exterior) that Intelligentsia  
sells, but I don't like to have to make that big a cupful (almost a  
small pot) to drink, and making less than a full one gives  
inconsistent results.
Good grief, it looks like I've established the Chicago Museum of  
Unsatisfactory French Press Devices.
On Oct 2, 2007, at 10:28 PM, stereoplegic wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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That's why I stopped using a Bodum clear acrylic FP travel cup--the =
plunger wiggled too much and sometimes would even separate and plunge =
through the center of the screen, leaving the screen suspended halfway =
down. The Nissan and Starbucks stainless thermals work better but impart =
a metal taste to the coffee as it cools. There's a "boot" shaped 20-oz. =
press (colored enameled exterior) that Intelligentsia sells, but I don't =
like to have to make that big a cupful (almost a small pot) to drink, =
and making less than a full one gives inconsistent results.
Good grief, it looks like = I've established the Chicago Museum of Unsatisfactory French Press = Devices. On Oct 2, 2007, at 10:28 PM, stereoplegic = wrote:
note on the silicone = "scratchless" plunger: make sure the hole in the lid through which the = plunger goes is narrow enough to allow the plunger to depress w/ as = little horizontal movement as possible. my plastic FP/tumbler has a very = wide opening, so many course grounds as well as fines get through the = side silicone lining around the plunger if i don't make absolutely sure = i'm pressing straight down. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-52-478988990--

10) From: Matthew Evans
Travel with plastic french press (OK with Lexan prench press)
   
  I know this isn't the kind of travel you're talking about, but I do alot of hiking and rafting that calls for some backcountry coffee.  I have tried many different methods of making my morning brew.  I tried the pour over, it took too long and was very cumbersome (especially for 4 guys), I tried the Moka pot, but it was too heavy and didn't make enough.  I tried the Ilsa "neopolitan" method (which is awesome, but the coffee gets cold too fast), and finally I ran across a "french press" contraption that goes inside your Nalgene bottle.  So now I put my french press ground coffee in, pour 200 degree water into my Nalgene bottle (that all hikers have many of), and slide the french press in.  Voila, I've got 32 oz of piping hot, delicious coffee that stays hot inside that Nalgene no matter what temperature it is outside.  I took care of 7 hiker buds with two of these with very little hassle.  It was awesome to share my home-roasted coffee with guys sitting around the fire 4
 or 5,000 feet up by a mountain lake.  I haven't noticed any problem with taste, and it's really easy.
   
  Matt
  Roasting in AK, only the strong survive!!
---------------------------------
 Check out  the hottest 2008 models today at Yahoo! Autos.

11) From: Robert Joslin
Hey Matt
     I've not seen the device you've described.  Where can they be
purchased?
Thanks
Josh
On 10/3/07, Matthew Evans  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Matthew Evans
Josh,
   
  I purchased it at REI.... if you don't have an REI around you, you can go to REI.com and search for it.  It's called the Press-Bot.  Just get a Nalgene bottle ($12-$15) with a wide-mouth, then the Press-Bot for $20 and you're set.
   
  Cheers,
   
  Matt
---------------------------------
Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally,  mobile search that gives answers, not web links. 

13) From: Brian Kamnetz
Matt,
Did you say that Nalgene  bottles insulate the coffee? I looked on the
web for Nalgene bottles and they looked like plain plastic bottles, so
I was wondering.
Brian
On 10/4/07, Matthew Evans  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: JoAnne Phillips
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We will be traveling in a couple of weeks so I investigated this.  I  
don't think it will take me from my beloved AP, but I found something  
interesting.  It is called a Java Grinder and you can see it here:http://www.rei.com/product/739919Is anyone familiar with this?  It just might be what I'm looking for  
- not for home, but for traveling.
JoAnne in Tucson
On Oct 4, 2007, at 1:58 PM, Matthew Evans wrote:
Josh,
I purchased it at REI.... if you don't have an REI around you, you  
can go to REI.com and search for it.  It's called the Press-Bot.   
Just get a Nalgene bottle ($12-$15) with a wide-mouth, then the Press- 
Bot for $20 and you're set.
Cheers,
Matt
Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not web  
links.
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We will be traveling in a =
couple of weeks so I investigated this.  I don't think it will take me =
from my beloved AP, but I found something interesting.  It is called a =
Java Grinder and you can see it here:
Is =">http://www.rei.com/product/7399=19
Is = anyone familiar with this?  It just might be what I'm looking for - = not for home, but for traveling.
JoAnne in = Tucson On Oct 4, 2007, at 1:58 PM, Matthew Evans = wrote:
Josh, =   I purchased it at REI.... if you don't have an REI = around you, you can go to REI.com and search for it.  It's called the = Press-Bot.  Just get a Nalgene bottle ($12-$15) with a wide-mouth, = then the Press-Bot for $20 and you're set.   = Cheers,   Matt
Yahoo! oneSearch: = Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not = web links. = --Apple-Mail-3-639326399--

15) From: Robert Joslin
Matt
Got several favorite REI stores although none are near.  One in your
neighborhood on Northern Lights in Anchorage, the biggest of the 3 (old
water plant) in Denver, and in old town Albuquerque.  Guess I'll check it
out on line.
Thanks.                                               Josh
On 10/4/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: stereoplegic
i looked into one but read in reviews that it was slow and hard to hold 
in place while grinding (makes sense, look at it's shape). like our man 
Brett, i'd go for a Zassenhaus or a Trosser (actually i did go for two 
Trossers, thx to Brett. both work great and grind much quicker than i 
was expecting).
JoAnne Phillips wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Matthew Evans
Brian,
   
  They're actually Lexan... for what it's worth.  They do an amazing job of keeping things hot.  I can sit around for an hour at 40-50 degrees, hanging out by the morning camp fire, and my coffee is still piping hot when I pour the last of it into my cup.  When I do winter overnights I will sometimes put boiling water in a Nalgene bottle and throw it in the bottom of my sleeping bag for a little extra warmth, when I get up 7 or 8 hours later the bottle will still be very warm to the touch.  Not sure what the physics are... just know it works for me!!
   
  Beats the heck out of cowboy coffee!!
   
  Cheers,
   
  Matt
---------------------------------
Need a vacation? Get great deals to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel. 

18) From: John Brown
i have one do you want it?
JoAnne Phillips wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: David
Or you could try this onehttp://espressoparts.com/product/GO_GREENER/Go_Greener_Go_Travel_Coffee_Kit.html--- John Brown 
<Snip>
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<Snip>
,
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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20) From: Sandy Andina
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I considered that but went with the larger-capacity Traveler II for  
four bucks more.  Plastic grinders are static-prone; some address  
this by lining the grinds chamber with foil, others by "huffing" into  
it so that the moisture in their breath will inhibit static. I just  
spread tissues or washcloths out beneath it to catch the grinds that  
leap out. However, I moved up to a Zass Turkish--heavier, but faster  
and no static.
On Oct 4, 2007, at 8:23 PM, JoAnne Phillips wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-67-647689877
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I considered that but went with the larger-capacity Traveler II for four =
bucks more.  Plastic grinders are static-prone; some address this by =
lining the grinds chamber with foil, others by "huffing" into it so that =
the moisture in their breath will inhibit static. I just spread tissues =
or washcloths out beneath it to catch the grinds that leap out. However, =
I moved up to a Zass Turkish--heavier, but faster and no =
static.
On Oct 4, 2007, at 8:23 PM, JoAnne Phillips =
wrote:
We will be traveling in a couple of weeks so I = investigated this.  I don't think it will take me from my beloved AP, = but I found something interesting.  It is called a Java Grinder and = you can see it here:
Is =">http://www.rei.com/product/7399=19
Is = anyone familiar with this?  It just might be what I'm looking for - = not for home, but for traveling.
JoAnne in = Tucson On Oct 4, 2007, at 1:58 PM, Matthew Evans = wrote:
Josh, =   I purchased it at REI.... if you don't have an REI = around you, you can go to REI.com and search for it.  It's called the = Press-Bot.  Just get a Nalgene bottle ($12-$15) with a wide-mouth, = then the Press-Bot for $20 and you're set.   = Cheers,   Matt
Yahoo! oneSearch: = Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not = web links. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-67-647689877--

21) From: Sean Cary
I did not find any good reviews on the Press Bot - and waived off on it.
I am using a Big Sky Bistro 20oz press mug every day and it works
great - getting some dust from the Zassenhaus Turkish, but I am not
really bothered by it.  The Zassenhaus is not as consistent as I would
like, but WAY better then a whirly blade.
Sean
In Fallujah - and it has been under 100 almost everyday!
Ramadi is in my future shortly and I am stoked - have not been there yet!
On 10/4/07, Matthew Evans  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Steven Van Dyke
At 10:05 PM 10/4/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Hey!
That's pretty much what I had in my travel case - until I got my Zass 
Turkish.  Toss in a small IBIS pot to heat the water, the coffee, and 
a few 'accessories' and you've got it. 

23) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks, Matt. That is very interesting. I've never heard of this
material before. Good to know.
Brian
On 10/4/07, Matthew Evans  wrote:
<Snip>


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