HomeRoast Digest


Topic: whirley pop roast (4 msgs / 178 lines)
1) From: Frank Awbrey
I tried doing a whirley pop roast tonight for the first time. Roasted a cup 
and a half (15 oz or so) of Honduras FTO San Marcos-Cocosam Coop. Has anyone 
tried that, yet? For being a first time WP roast, it doesn't "look" too bad, 
although it roasted really quick. First crack started somewhere around 2 3/4 
minutes. I pulled it somewhere around 6 minutes. I was hoping to get it to 
go 10-12 minutes or so. I don't think it got into second crack too much, 
although it is a little darker (actually not too much, though) than what I 
wanted, I don't have any noticeable oils on it (yet) and not a whole lot of 
smoke that I could see. Probably a full city or fc+ roast.
I tried using a thermometer, but took it out about half way through the 
roast. It was just pretty much in the way. Next time I roast this way, I 
will only use about 1/3 heat instead of 1/2 on my electric stove and go from 
there.
What I did like about it is doing just the one roast and getting enough done 
for about a weeks worth of coffee drinking. This would have taken 3, maybe 4 
roasts in my air popper to roast this much. Will see how it tastes either 
tomorrow or Friday.
Thx, for listening, Frank
ps, How's the Arizona get together looking? Here's hoping I can make it.

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
Frank,
I haven't used this method and am far from expert with any method, but
my guess would be that it is underroasted. But I certainly could be
wrong. I'm looking forward to hearing more about this roast.
Brian
On 10/4/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
Hello Frank,
I like the thermometer as a way to gauge the heat level relative to first
crack.  We know what temp. first crack is at, I compare that to my
thermometer reading.   My thermometer always reads 285 degrees when I hit
first crack.
I was pre-heating the vessel too hot.  I was preheating to 350-400 on my
thermometer.  Now, I pre-heat to about the first crack temp (instead of
preheating my beans).
When your whirley popper is new, it runs a bit hotter than when it gets
coated.  I read that on SM's Stovetop Popper Method - quoted from that
page..."*PLEASE NOTE:* A thermometer is going to give an incurrate reading
when the inside of the popper is shiny and reflective, so use a LOWER heat
until the popper is broken in and seasoned."
I have never reached first crack that quickly, the fastest for me was about
4 minutes.
I have a gas stove, so I can't compare to the values on the electric stove,
but I start out on #3 (med. low) to preheat, dump the beans in and raise
temp to #5 (medium), one minute after first crack, lower heat to #3.
My  ATTFC (average time to first crack) is now about 8 minutes.  I have been
putting in about 12 oz of beans.  I'm slowly working my way up, but I don't
have the courage to go to 16 oz all at once.  I need to adjust the agitator
a bit first.
Hopefully, some of my reflections are helpful to you.  This group has been
so helpful to me, I hope I can contribute a bit.
I have not tried the Honduras FTO San Marcos-Cocosam Coop, let us know your
impressions.
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA
On 10/3/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Tom Ulmer
I ground down the gears on two different Whirly-Pops before moving to =
drum
roasting. The third unit is still in reserve. My typical roasting =
session is
five different 12 ounce roasts. The Whirly-Pop works quite well and can
produce outstanding coffee. One can achieve great control with a little
practice and forethought. 
On my electric stove I used a cast iron griddle on the burner for a more
consistent temperature - disclaimer - most flat cook tops recommend not
using cast iron but in my opinion as long as you don't drop it on the
surface it's no risk. I found it necessary to find a burner setting that
peaked at 475F (after that I agree the thermometer is useless unless =
you're
datalogging) and locate a stool I could rest against while still =
attending
to the roast. You can control the length of the roast quite easily by =
simply
lifting the Whirly-Pop and swirling the beans easily stretching the =
roast as
long as you'd like. In time you will know when the cracks are going to =
occur
by smell and smoke production.
My cooling strategy involved a quick exit outside to an industrial =
pedestal
fan and a couple of colanders, blowing the chaff into the driveway. I =
still
use the same method of cooling but my drum roasting has moved into the
garage.


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