HomeRoast Digest


Topic: asleep (literally) at the switch (8 msgs / 527 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Well, it is nice to be back here.  I have been on the West Coast, San 
Diego, producing a show for a client.  It went great, though I was in 
withdrawal for my coffee.  I couldn't get my act together to get 
everything I needed to take beans, grind them and brew them on-site, 
and I am still not sure I can do it with my schedule.  That said, the 
show went great, and we all came back wasted.  I took a red-eye back 
so I could make a number of doctors' appointments I had.  I did 
that.  Then the next day my accountant came out from LA to work with 
my bookkeeper and others on the company books as we plan for end of 
this busy part of the year and the end of the calendar year.
That said, very little sleep was had for the last 11 days.  But, 
still, I needed to roast, wanted to roast.  I had put some roasted 
beans in the freezer before I left so I would come back to some 
decent coffee, they held up well.  But roasting was to be done.
Tonight was the night.  I pulled out the IR2 and all of the 
accessories, chose my coffee for the week, Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 
at FC, or so I planned.  But my body had other plans.  I set the 
machine to the profile I use for this bean when taking it to FC, and 
it has room to spare for another few beans which I take to FC+.  I 
use sound, sight, and smell to stop the roast.
I disconnected the one smoke detector that sometimes goes off.  I 
connected the dryer duct hose to the ceiling fan, even remembering to 
turn the fan on this time.  I measured out my beans, 157 grams.  I 
turned on the machine, I held down the dryer duct with my hot mitts, 
I watched and listened, and somewhere in there I closed my 
eyes.  Just for a second, I thought.  I went out.  The "whir" of the 
machine, the noise of the beans as they were being blown around, all 
conspired to put this mind to rest.
My fingers got very hot, awakening me from my momentary slip into the 
world of the unconscious. Actually, it was a bit more than a 
moment.  I awoke to a rolling second crack just beginning.  I hit the 
cool button to stop the cycle and begin cooling the beans.  I feared 
I had ruined them.
I am somewhat surprised to see that the beans are a beautiful color, 
darker than I normally see with this bean, but still lovely.  The 
bean crunch still had a hint of chocolate to it.  I certainly 
expected to see patches of oil, but haven't found any.  I got 
lucky.  The bean went a bit past where I wanted it, but I don't think 
it is ruined.  It may not be the best, but I still can't wait to try 
it.  Since I missed much of the roast I am having a bit of trouble 
telling if I hit FC+ or beyond.  The lack of oil confuses me and that 
may be due to my eyes just wanted to close.
All said and done, it is nice to be back and roasting.  I leave again 
in a week, but for a shorter time.  I still won't be taking beans.  I 
haven't gotten all I need, nor have I figured out how to do it with 
our schedule, though I am close.  We get up between 4:30 and 5:00 
a.m., I hit the bed at 1:00 a.m. most nights, sometimes later.  I do 
that for 5 to 7 days.  That is production.  I do ship a lot out to 
the site in advance, so I figure I can get it all in order.  I wanted 
a Turkish grinder, but got an Armin Trusser for now.  It works very 
well, an Ebay purchase at a great price.  The burs are good and the 
grind is excellent, so far - three grinds only to date.  I could send 
that and an aeropress, plus a very good Thermos, in advance.  Then 
get up a few minutes early, grind and brew, make enough for the 
morning, which is a decent number of cups.  Then when all is over I 
can ship back.  For this next trip, no time.  And I have to see how 
this will affect my day, with that schedule every minute of sleep is 
needed, but so is good coffee.  Since I drink the coffee for the 
flavor, not just the caffeine, I switched to Red Bull and soda from 
the catering department, forgoing their coffee.  I didn't want to 
even try a Starbucks - though I thought of filling it with soy and 
sugar to mask the taste.  That seemed a waste.
So, maybe the plan of shipping things out will work or maybe it will 
be too much to do and I am better off just taking a few days off 
while on show site.
I did learn to get sleep before roasting.  I think I may have gotten 
lucky with this roast.  I may have something decent and I didn't have 
a fire, both good things.
It is so nice to be back.  I didn't even have time to read this list 
while on this trip.  I missed you all.
Stephen

2) From: Stephen Carey
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Well, it is nice to be back here.  I have been on the West Coast, San 
Diego, producing a show for a client.  It went great, though I was in 
withdrawal for my coffee.  I couldn't get my act together to get 
everything I needed to take beans, grind them and brew them on-site, 
and I am still not sure I can do it with my schedule.  That said, the 
show went great, and we all came back wasted.  I took a red-eye back 
so I could make a number of doctors' appointments I had.  I did 
that.  Then the next day my accountant came out from LA to work with 
my bookkeeper and others on the company books as we plan for end of 
this busy part of the year and the end of the calendar year.
That said, very little sleep was had for the last 11 days.  But, 
still, I needed to roast, wanted to roast.  I had put some roasted 
beans in the freezer before I left so I would come back to some 
decent coffee, they held up well.  But roasting was to be done.
Tonight was the night.  I pulled out the IR2 and all of the 
accessories, chose my coffee for the week, Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, 
at FC, or so I planned.  But my body had other plans.  I set the 
machine to the profile I use for this bean when taking it to FC, and 
it has room to spare for another few beans which I take to FC+.  I 
use sound, sight, and smell to stop the roast.
I disconnected the one smoke detector that sometimes goes off.  I 
connected the dryer duct hose to the ceiling fan, even remembering to 
turn the fan on this time.  I measured out my beans, 157 grams.  I 
turned on the machine, I held down the dryer duct with my hot mitts, 
I watched and listened, and somewhere in there I closed my 
eyes.  Just for a second, I thought.  I went out.  The "whir" of the 
machine, the noise of the beans as they were being blown around, all 
conspired to put this mind to rest.
My fingers got very hot, awakening me from my momentary slip into the 
world of the unconscious. Actually, it was a bit more than a 
moment.  I awoke to a rolling second crack just beginning.  I hit the 
cool button to stop the cycle and begin cooling the beans.  I feared 
I had ruined them.
I am somewhat surprised to see that the beans are a beautiful color, 
darker than I normally see with this bean, but still lovely.  The 
bean crunch still had a hint of chocolate to it.  I certainly 
expected to see patches of oil, but haven't found any.  I got 
lucky.  The bean went a bit past where I wanted it, but I don't think 
it is ruined.  It may not be the best, but I still can't wait to try 
it.  Since I missed much of the roast I am having a bit of trouble 
telling if I hit FC+ or beyond.  The lack of oil confuses me and that 
may be due to my eyes just wanted to close.
All said and done, it is nice to be back and roasting.  I leave again 
in a week, but for a shorter time.  I still won't be taking beans.  I 
haven't gotten all I need, nor have I figured out how to do it with 
our schedule, though I am close.  We get up between 4:30 and 5:00 
a.m., I hit the bed at 1:00 a.m. most nights, sometimes later.  I do 
that for 5 to 7 days.  That is production.  I do ship a lot out to 
the site in advance, so I figure I can get it all in order.  I wanted 
a Turkish grinder, but got an Armin Trusser for now.  It works very 
well, an Ebay purchase at a great price.  The burs are good and the 
grind is excellent, so far - three grinds only to date.  I could send 
that and an aeropress, plus a very good Thermos, in advance.  Then 
get up a few minutes early, grind and brew, make enough for the 
morning, which is a decent number of cups.  Then when all is over I 
can ship back.  For this next trip, no time.  And I have to see how 
this will affect my day, with that schedule every minute of sleep is 
needed, but so is good coffee.  Since I drink the coffee for the 
flavor, not just the caffeine, I switched to Red Bull and soda from 
the catering department, forgoing their coffee.  I didn't want to 
even try a Starbucks - though I thought of filling it with soy and 
sugar to mask the taste.  That seemed a waste.
So, maybe the plan of shipping things out will work or maybe it will 
be too much to do and I am better off just taking a few days off 
while on show site.
I did learn to get sleep before roasting.  I think I may have gotten 
lucky with this roast.  I may have something decent and I didn't have 
a fire, both good things.
It is so nice to be back.  I didn't even have time to read this list 
while on this trip.  I missed you all.
Stephen 
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Well, it is nice to be back here.  I have been on the
West Coast, San Diego, producing a show for a client.  It went
great, though I was in withdrawal for my coffee.  I couldn't get my
act together to get everything I needed to take beans, grind them and
brew them on-site, and I am still not sure I can do it with my
schedule.  That said, the show went great, and we all came back
wasted.  I took a red-eye back so I could make a number of doctors'
appointments I had.  I did that.  Then the next day my
accountant came out from LA to work with my bookkeeper and others on the
company books as we plan for end of this busy part of the year and the
end of the calendar year.
That said, very little sleep was had for the last 11 days.  But,
still, I needed to roast, wanted to roast.  I had put some roasted
beans in the freezer before I left so I would come back to some decent
coffee, they held up well.  But roasting was to be done.
Tonight was the night.  I pulled out the IR2 and all of the
accessories, chose my coffee for the week, Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma, at
FC, or so I planned.  But my body had other plans.  I set the
machine to the profile I use for this bean when taking it to FC, and it
has room to spare for another few beans which I take to FC+.  I use
sound, sight, and smell to stop the roast.
I disconnected the one smoke detector that sometimes goes off.  I
connected the dryer duct hose to the ceiling fan, even remembering to
turn the fan on this time.  I measured out my beans, 157
grams.  I turned on the machine, I held down the dryer duct with my
hot mitts, I watched and listened, and somewhere in there I closed my
eyes.  Just for a second, I thought.  I went out.  The
"whir" of the machine, the noise of the beans as they were
being blown around, all conspired to put this mind to rest. 
My fingers got very hot, awakening me from my momentary slip into the
world of the unconscious. Actually, it was a bit more than a
moment.  I awoke to a rolling second crack just beginning.  I
hit the cool button to stop the cycle and begin cooling the beans. 
I feared I had ruined them.  
I am somewhat surprised to see that the beans are a beautiful color,
darker than I normally see with this bean, but still lovely.  The
bean crunch still had a hint of chocolate to it.  I certainly
expected to see patches of oil, but haven't found any.  I got
lucky.  The bean went a bit past where I wanted it, but I don't
think it is ruined.  It may not be the best, but I still can't wait
to try it.  Since I missed much of the roast I am having a bit of
trouble telling if I hit FC+ or beyond.  The lack of oil confuses me
and that may be due to my eyes just wanted to close.
All said and done, it is nice to be back and roasting.  I leave
again in a week, but for a shorter time.  I still won't be taking
beans.  I haven't gotten all I need, nor have I figured out how to
do it with our schedule, though I am close.  We get up between 4:30
and 5:00 a.m., I hit the bed at 1:00 a.m. most nights, sometimes
later.  I do that for 5 to 7 days.  That is production.  I
do ship a lot out to the site in advance, so I figure I can get it all in
order.  I wanted a Turkish grinder, but got an Armin Trusser for
now.  It works very well, an Ebay purchase at a great price. 
The burs are good and the grind is excellent, so far - three grinds only
to date.  I could send that and an aeropress, plus a very good
Thermos, in advance.  Then get up a few minutes early, grind and
brew, make enough for the morning, which is a decent number of
cups.  Then when all is over I can ship back.  For this next
trip, no time.  And I have to see how this will affect my day, with
that schedule every minute of sleep is needed, but so is good
coffee.  Since I drink the coffee for the flavor, not just the
caffeine, I switched to Red Bull and soda from the catering department,
forgoing their coffee.  I didn't want to even try a Starbucks -
though I thought of filling it with soy and sugar to mask the
taste.  That seemed a waste.  
So, maybe the plan of shipping things out will work or maybe it will be
too much to do and I am better off just taking a few days off while on
show site.  
I did learn to get sleep before roasting.  I think I may have gotten
lucky with this roast.  I may have something decent and I didn't
have a fire, both good things.  
It is so nice to be back.  I didn't even have time to read this list
while on this trip.  I missed you all.  
Stephen
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3) From: Jeff Bensen
Stephen -
I too have fallen asleep at the switch, fortunately without major 
incident. At worst, I've wound up with a slightly darker roast than 
planned. No fires yet, knock wood.
Your travel schedule sounds similar to mine. I've just come off of 
seven weeks of little or no sleep while flying to San Diego, Utah, 
Maryland and DC. That's one of the reasons I rarely post to the list, 
and do not get the luxury of reading it on a regular basis. I do, 
however, receive every email and save it in a folder via a filter. 
When I need some info, I run a search through the several years worth 
of archives on my computer. This group is a gold mine of ideas, 
opinions and information.
I rarely travel without some homeroast, a Zass Turkish grinder, hot 
pot, 32 oz double-wall stainless french press, a small scrub brush 
and a thermos. I toss it all in my checked bag, surrounded by 
clothes. Making coffee in the morning does not impact my schedule 
very much. I intersperse that activity with showering and shaving. 
When I get back to my room at night I spend about 10 minutes cleaning 
everything and setting it up for the next morning.
More than once I have opened my thermos in a conference room with 20 
other engineers and heard the presentation come to a halt as the 
aroma floods the room. Questions such as 'What is that?' usually 
follow. Although I have described homeroasting to numerous people, 
there have been no converts to date.
I actually made my last trip, a quick 3-day jaunt, without my coffee 
equipment. I was out of roasted beans and had no time to roast before 
leaving (I chose sleep instead). What a wake up call that was! By day 
two I gave up trying to find drinkable coffee and switched to diet 
Coke. The next time I'm faced with this situation, I think I'll give 
up a little sleep and roast a quick batch before leaving.
The day after I got back I fired up the roaster, pulling out some of 
last year's Brazil Yellow Bourbon and IMV. Drank my first vac pot of 
the Brazil just after cooling the roast. Even with no rest it was 
excellent. A pot of the IMV will follow in a few hours. It's great to 
be back home.
- Jeff Bensen
   Palm Bay, FL
At 08:47 AM 10/8/2007, Stephen Carey wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Robert Gulley
Stephen
My first roast with the IR2 was with that bean and I roasted just 
about to the point you did, wanting to see the whole process, even if 
I went a bit dark. Les (from the list) told me I was fortunate to 
have picked this bean as my first from the sampler pack because it 
has a wide latitude for roasts. I did enjoy it, even if some of the 
tastes that would have been there at a lighter roast were a bit muted 
- (my poor palate can't tell yet!).
Glad you had your mitts on!
RG
At 09:34 PM 10/7/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Stephen Carey
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I am going to have to get everything and do this.  If I am getting up 
at 4:30, I can find the 10 minutes to grind and brew, besides, I am 
the producer, I can be 10 minutes late.  I will get swarmed over at 
the control table, but one engineer offered to build a little coffee 
nook in one of the larger cases that usually house TV monitors for 
the cameras - not a bad idea - see, they want it.  In this case, I 
would ship ahead a bit more coffee, my hand grinder, and let them get 
a decent drip brewer or how water heater for a French Press.  I have 
been convinced.   Can't do it Monday, when I leave next, but for my 
next show I can.  Thanks for the ideas.
Also, glad you didn't go up in flames as you drifted off.  I was 
lucky with the bean, it is forgiving and tastes quite good.  It ends 
with a mixture of chocolate and a kind of fruit taste I can't 
describe, maybe just fruity as opposed to one type.  It does seem 
less bright than usual, but still smooth and refreshing.
Stephen
At 05:44 AM 10/9/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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I am going to have to get everything and do this.  If I
am getting up at 4:30, I can find the 10 minutes to grind and brew,
besides, I am the producer, I can be 10 minutes late.  I will get
swarmed over at the control table, but one engineer offered to build a
little coffee nook in one of the larger cases that usually house TV
monitors for the cameras - not a bad idea - see, they want it.  In
this case, I would ship ahead a bit more coffee, my hand grinder, and let
them get a decent drip brewer or how water heater for a French
Press.  I have been convinced.   Can't do it Monday, when
I leave next, but for my next show I can.  Thanks for the
ideas.
Also, glad you didn't go up in flames as you drifted off.  I was
lucky with the bean, it is forgiving and tastes quite good.  It ends
with a mixture of chocolate and a kind of fruit taste I can't describe,
maybe just fruity as opposed to one type.  It does seem less bright
than usual, but still smooth and refreshing.
Stephen
At 05:44 AM 10/9/2007, you wrote:
Stephen -
I too have fallen asleep at the switch, fortunately without major
incident. At worst, I've wound up with a slightly darker roast than
planned. No fires yet, knock wood.
Your travel schedule sounds similar to mine. I've just come off of seven
weeks of little or no sleep while flying to San Diego, Utah, Maryland and
DC. That's one of the reasons I rarely post to the list, and do not get
the luxury of reading it on a regular basis. I do, however, receive every
email and save it in a folder via a filter. When I need some info, I run
a search through the several years worth of archives on my computer. This
group is a gold mine of ideas, opinions and information.
I rarely travel without some homeroast, a Zass Turkish grinder, hot pot,
32 oz double-wall stainless french press, a small scrub brush and a
thermos. I toss it all in my checked bag, surrounded by clothes. Making
coffee in the morning does not impact my schedule very much. I
intersperse that activity with showering and shaving. When I get back to
my room at night I spend about 10 minutes cleaning everything and setting
it up for the next morning.
More than once I have opened my thermos in a conference room with 20
other engineers and heard the presentation come to a halt as the aroma
floods the room. Questions such as 'What is that?' usually follow.
Although I have described homeroasting to numerous people, there have
been no converts to date.
I actually made my last trip, a quick 3-day jaunt, without my coffee
equipment. I was out of roasted beans and had no time to roast before
leaving (I chose sleep instead). What a wake up call that was! By day two
I gave up trying to find drinkable coffee and switched to diet Coke. The
next time I'm faced with this situation, I think I'll give up a little
sleep and roast a quick batch before leaving.
The day after I got back I fired up the roaster, pulling out some of last
year's Brazil Yellow Bourbon and IMV. Drank my first vac pot of the
Brazil just after cooling the roast. Even with no rest it was excellent.
A pot of the IMV will follow in a few hours. It's great to be back
home.
- Jeff Bensen
  Palm Bay, FL
--=====================_351382859==.ALT--

6) From: Lynne Biziewski
Stephen -
It's so nice to see you are back - I missed your posts!
I have managed to ruin (totally burned) almost all of my stainless steel
pans,
not from falling asleep, but because I get distracted very easily. So much
so
that I started to worry that I was losing it - or just getting old fast! But
I realize
that I tend to be a bit absent minded, and some times I'm worse than others.
I solved my problem by a.) heating water for my coffee, occasional cups of
tea,
and $$ stretching ramen soups in my small Farberware coffeemaker. Whoo-hoo!
Found a good use for it - heats it up to a perfect temp, and I pour into my
FP. And
b.) now I never leave anything on or in the stove & go in another room
without
putting on the timer.
Since I started doing this - I've only had a couple of near-misses -
fortunately my
son went into the smoke filled kitchen & retrieved the smoldering mess in
the oven
both times.
Despite all of this, the only time my landlord has noticed anything (I made
sure he
replaced the batteries in the smoke alarm - which is in the hallway, around
the corner
from the kitchen) was when he was around when I roasted coffee.
Told me it "smelled like burning trash..." See if HE gets any brew!!
(then again, it was about a year ago that he thought my coffee roasting
was someone smoking something questionable.... he's not the brightest
kid on the block, by any means..)
Anyway, I wish you the absolute best w/the doctor visits. Sending a big
hug, too.
Wish I had an Aeropress & a decent Zass to send you for your trips - going
without homeroast is AWFUL!!
Lynne

7) From: Lynne Biziewski
You too!
Also, glad you didn't go up in flames as you drifted off.
<Snip>
One of the things I've discovered is that I can get very creative in order
to save beans - the only thing is, I can't
stand over roasting - but if that happens, I'll gift it off to someone who
actually likes burned beans. I've re-roasted
many a time in order to save something I couldn't drink, usually a result of
underroasting.
one engineer offered to build a little coffee nook in one of the larger
<Snip>
Hooray!! A coffee nook set-up would be great for your travels - you should
delegate the hand grinding, too.
 ; > })

8) From: Stephen Carey
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sounds like we both better keep batteries in our smoke detectors!!!
<Snip>
<Snip>
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sounds like we both better keep batteries in our smoke
detectors!!!
<snip>
Since I started doing this - I've only had a couple of near-misses -
fortunately my
son went into the smoke filled kitchen & retrieved the smoldering
mess in the oven
both times. 
<snip>
Lynne
--=====================_353522937==.ALT--


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