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Topic: Coffee: Recent Developments aka Diedrich's Roasting Workshop (3 msgs / 205 lines)
1) From: Jim Gundlach
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On Oct 10, 2007, at 8:04 AM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
I did some looking around for this book.  Price is around $200 for  
250 pages.  If there was ever an invitation to copyright violation,  
this is it.  Amazon makes some of the pages available on line and one  
can pick up some interesting tidbits of information that I find raise  
more questions than they answer.  Something that is typical of  
scientific research.  for example:
    They summarize research that shows that the amount of  
polysaccharide present is well correlated with maximum espresso foam  
stability.  They also note that robustas generally have higher  
polysaccharide content than arabica's.  But given that  
polysaccharides are generally tasteless, it would suggest that what  
we generally recognize as a good stable foam from a fresh roasted  
arabica is correlated with a rather tasteless component of roasted  
coffee.  I also believe that what ever it is in fresh roasted arabica  
coffees that produce a good espresso foam that disappears as the  
arabica coffee stales must be something besides polysaccharides.
     In general I find most of the material in the sample of pages I  
looked at and devoted to bivariate relationships that are not that  
helpful.  It is like much of the health research that makes it into  
the popular press.  Sensational and easy to understand bivariate  
relationships that don't work like you would expect when you apply  
them to the real multi-variate world that we live and roast in.  In  
other words, it is interesting to read about but be a cautious  
skeptic in applying what you take from it.
     pecan jim
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On Oct 10, 2007, =
at 8:04 AM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:

 A must-have reference book for = the serious roast 

person is titled,

=

"Coffee. Recent = Developments" from the World Agricultural 

Series. This is a

250-page book covering the = chemistry of coffee in thorough detail.

=
I did some looking around = for this book.  Price is around $200 for 250 pages.  If there was = ever an invitation to copyright violation, this is it.  Amazon makes = some of the pages available on line and one can pick up some interesting = tidbits of information that I find raise more questions than they = answer.  Something that is typical of scientific research.  for = example:   They summarize research that shows that the = amount of polysaccharide present is well correlated with maximum = espresso foam stability.  They also note that robustas generally have = higher polysaccharide content than arabica's.  But given that = polysaccharides are generally tasteless, it would suggest that what we = generally recognize as a good stable foam from a fresh roasted arabica = is correlated with a rather tasteless component of roasted coffee.  I = also believe that what ever it is in fresh roasted arabica coffees that = produce a good espresso foam that disappears as the arabica coffee = stales must be something besides polysaccharides.  
    In general I find = most of the material in the sample of pages I looked at and devoted to = bivariate relationships that are not that helpful.  It is like much of = the health research that makes it into the popular press.  Sensational = and easy to understand bivariate relationships that don't work like you = would expect when you apply them to the real multi-variate world that we = live and roast in.  In other words, it is interesting to read about = but be a cautious skeptic in applying what you take from = it.
   =  pecan jim= --Apple-Mail-8--1022145189--

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
?? I didn't say that ??
 
Actually working, typed while Kona Blue Sky roast sample batch #2
roasting...first batch was #1 this is F, next XF...
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jim Gundlach
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2007 9:24 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Re: Coffee: Recent Developments aka Diedrich's Roasting Workshop
On Oct 10, 2007, at 8:04 AM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
A must-have reference book for the serious roast 
person is titled,
"Coffee. Recent Developments" from the World Agricultural 
Series. This is a
250-page book covering the chemistry of coffee in thorough detail.
I did some looking around for this book. Price is around $200 for 250 pages.
If there was ever an invitation to copyright violation, this is it. Amazon
makes some of the pages available on line and one can pick up some
interesting tidbits of information that I find raise more questions than
they answer. Something that is typical of scientific research. for example:
They summarize research that shows that the amount of polysaccharide present
is well correlated with maximum espresso foam stability. They also note that
robustas generally have higher polysaccharide content than arabica's. But
given that polysaccharides are generally tasteless, it would suggest that
what we generally recognize as a good stable foam from a fresh roasted
arabica is correlated with a rather tasteless component of roasted coffee. I
also believe that what ever it is in fresh roasted arabica coffees that
produce a good espresso foam that disappears as the arabica coffee stales
must be something besides polysaccharides. 
In general I find most of the material in the sample of pages I looked at
and devoted to bivariate relationships that are not that helpful. It is like
much of the health research that makes it into the popular press.
Sensational and easy to understand bivariate relationships that don't work
like you would expect when you apply them to the real multi-variate world
that we live and roast in. In other words, it is interesting to read about
but be a cautious skeptic in applying what you take from it.
pecan jim

3) From: John Moody
If you have some time to kill, you may find interesting historical reading
in this book.
All about Coffee By William Harrison Ukers
Published 1922, The Tea and Coffee Trade Journal Company, 796 pages
The entire thing can be read online or downloaded from books.google.com
John


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