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Topic: Liberica varietal and Kona/now Heavenly Hawaiian (6 msgs / 175 lines)
1) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Am I confused are is HH the guys with the gift shop in Kona? HH has a 
reputation I think (the people, not the coffee) that has a few dents 
in it, but then again so does everyone in Kona :-0  I jest, but as 
far as the Liberica graft, it is common in many places (where they 
can afford to do it on a mass scale) and was researched extensible in 
Colombia at Cenicafe. I was there and saw the liberica seedlings in 
the nursery for this purpose. The idea is partly that grafting to 
robusta might have cup implications, not immediately, but if plants 
are derived from such a graft. Not being a geneticist, I am not 
exactly sure if hybridization / mutation through grafting is a 
reality, or just a franken-myth. Can somebody on the list answer that 
question?
Tom
Mike, I hope Tom offers a Heavenly Hawaiin KONA someday. I' ve been enjoying
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

2) From: Jim Gundlach
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On Oct 11, 2007, at 6:29 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
I know of an experiment conducted back in the early 60's that grafted  
male sterile (flowers did not produce viable pollen)  plant material  
to fertile-male root stock with controlled within flower only  
pollination that produced some viable seeds.  I hope that makes sense  
but it was interpreted as support for the argument for hybridization  
through grafting.  I believe it involved the petunia.  This was from  
lectures in my undergraduate biology classes at Oklahoma State back  
in 1967.   This is not my area but I would guess that some of the  
more recent discoveries that led to using viruses to transmit DNA  
across species could lead to a hypothesis that the male fertility  
could have been transmitted through viral transmission of DNA from  
the root stock to the flowering tissue.
      pecan jim
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On Oct 11, 2007, =
at 6:29 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:

 Not being a geneticist, I am = not exactly sure if hybridization / mutation through grafting is a = reality, or just a franken-myth. Can somebody on the list answer that = question?


I know of an experiment = conducted back in the early 60's that grafted male sterile (flowers did = not produce viable pollen)  plant material to fertile-male root = stock with controlled within flower only pollination that produced = some viable seeds.  I hope that makes sense but it was interpreted = as support for the argument for hybridization through grafting.  I = believe it involved the petunia.  This was from lectures in my = undergraduate biology classes at Oklahoma State back in 1967.   This = is not my area but I would guess that some of the more recent = discoveries that led to using viruses to transmit DNA across species = could lead to a hypothesis that the male fertility could have been = transmitted through viral transmission of DNA from the root stock to the = flowering tissue.           pecan = jim= --Apple-Mail-10--907738512--

3) From: Clay Spence
The nutrients and other stuff supplied by the rootstock to the
branches could easily vary with the rootstock and have a strong effect
on the coffee without any changes in DNA. That doesn't mean there
aren't genetic changes. An anecdote: The piece of land I grew up on
had been owned by someone who obviously loved fruit trees. Among the
others, there were a couple of lemon trees with orange branches
grafted on. The oranges were much more tart than typical oranges. Too
bad they didn't complete the experiment by grafting lemon branches
onto an orange tree.
Clay

4) From: Robert Joslin
Couldn't resist putting in my two cents worth.  A rootstock permitted to
develop branches, leaves, fruit and seed from its own tissue.....those
things should display characteristics of the rootstock.  Its function is
usually considered to be basically mechanical.  Grafted material above the
rootstock SHOULD reflect characteristics of the graft only.  I've seen pecan
grafted on hickory rootstock and the nuts tasted like......pecans, not
hickorynuts.  BUT certain scion/rootstock combinations in apples produce
unusual effects...dwarfing, altered fruiting patterns, etc., so I suppose it
is conceivable that the rootstock could have some effect on the fruit of the
coffee plant and ultimately the taste of the coffee. Its just very difficult
to imagine how.                Josh
On 10/11/07, Clay Spence  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: javafool
I have purchased HH and TOF coffee a few times and have realized the =
benefit
of Tom's careful cupping and reviews. They harvest their coffee the same
time of the year as other Kona growers, with some variation I suppose =
based
on altitude. But they do sell their coffee year round. Some I've had was
good, fresh Kona and others seemed to have lost the flavor highlights =
and
richness that fade with age. I am also sure the flavor and quality vary =
from
harvest to harvest due to weather. I decided my next HH/TOF purchase =
would
probably be when Tom decides the lot he buys is good enough to offer on =
the
SM site.
Terry

6) From: Kevin Creason
Subject:
re:+Liberica varietal and Kona/now Heavenly Hawaiian
From:
Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
Date:
Thu, 11 Oct 2007 16:29:12 -0700
To:
homeroast
 > The idea is partly that grafting to robusta might have cup 
implications, not immediately, but if plants are derived from such a graft.
 >Not being a geneticist, I am not exactly sure if hybridization / 
mutation through grafting is a reality, or just a franken-myth.
 >Can somebody on the list answer that question?
Tom, I'm no geneticist either but I watch one on tv.
My grandpa many years back planted seeds from a pear and got a 
hawthorne... or something like that. It flowered but never made a fruit 
if I got the story straight. So strange things can come out of graftings.


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