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Topic: A Combo Posting (3 msgs / 202 lines)
1) From: Bernard Gerrard
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Congratulations and thanks to Sweet Marias.  You have brought great 
pleasure into many lives.  /Ad multos annos.
/Coffee snobbery.  Yes, it is true.  If snob is too strong a word, what 
about SICA (_S_eriously _I_nformed _C_offee _A_ddict)?  "No thank you.  
I am a SICA."  when offered Starbucks.  Or,  "I used to like that coffee 
before I became a SICA."  Not to be confused with sicko.
Dark roasting.  My take, as others, is that it is a combination of 
factors.  Basic ignorance, profit margin (cheap beans) and  trendiness 
thanks to the ubiquitous Starbucks.   Where I live (North East 
USA.....no additional info.)  There has been a local coffee 
roasting/cafe business for years.   Ten to 15 years ago this was hot 
stuff where many different coffees could be obtained.  The owner/roaster 
was into the dark roast thing and seriously opinionated to boot.  
Virtually all the glass storage units were dark with the oil sludge that 
accumulates from that type of roast.  In addition there were countless 
varieties of  "candy" coffees in some of the weirdest flavors.  Even I, 
ignorant as I basically was in those days, found the basic varietal 
coffees burnt tasting with little to differentiate them one from the 
other except in acidity.  The first thing a new owner of the 
establishment did was stop the mindless flavor stuff, reduce the number 
of varietals and "lighten up" a bit.  He said to me that he had 
complaints that there was no longer Hazel Nut-Mocha-Irish 
Creme-Watermelon flavor anymore. He did have those flavoring extracts 
for do it your selfers!
The "amateur" term should not be indulged in.  Reflect, dear Reader,  
that we do know our basics and whatever our real or imagined degree of 
expertise we are light years ahead of most of the Big Roasters.  Just 
because we roast for ourselves in small quantities does not constitute 
amateurism.  We are "small batch experts". 
/ Now raise a cup of your best in thanks to Tom and Maria for bringing  
us to a degree of Enlightenment.   May they have every success, 
happiness and prosperity!   /
.................Bernard C Gerrard
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Congratulations and thanks to Sweet Marias.  You have brought great
pleasure into many lives.  Ad multos annos.
Coffee snobbery.  Yes, it is true.  If snob is too strong a word,
what about SICA (Seriously Informed Coffee Addict)? 
"No thank you.  I am a SICA."  when offered Starbucks.  Or,  "I used to
like that coffee before I became a SICA."  Not to be confused with
sicko.
Dark roasting.  My take, as others, is that it is a combination of
factors.  Basic ignorance, profit margin (cheap beans) and  trendiness
thanks to the ubiquitous Starbucks.   Where I live (North East
USA.....no additional info.)  There has been a local coffee
roasting/cafe business for years.   Ten to 15 years ago this was hot
stuff where many different coffees could be obtained.  The
owner/roaster was into the dark roast thing and seriously opinionated
to boot.  Virtually all the glass storage units were dark with the oil
sludge that accumulates from that type of roast.  In addition there
were countless varieties of  "candy" coffees in some of the weirdest
flavors.  Even I, ignorant as I basically was in those days, found the
basic varietal coffees burnt tasting with little to differentiate them
one from the other except in acidity.  The first thing a new owner of
the establishment did was stop the mindless flavor stuff, reduce the
number of varietals and "lighten up" a bit.  He said to me that he had
complaints that there was no longer Hazel Nut-Mocha-Irish
Creme-Watermelon flavor anymore. He did have those flavoring extracts
for do it your selfers! 
The "amateur" term should not be indulged in.  Reflect, dear Reader, 
that we do know our basics and whatever our real or imagined degree of
expertise we are light years ahead of most of the Big Roasters.  Just
because we roast for ourselves in small quantities does not constitute
amateurism.  We are "small batch experts".  
 Now raise a cup of your best in thanks to Tom and Maria for
bringing  us to a degree of Enlightenment.   May they have every
success, happiness and prosperity!   
.................Bernard C Gerrard
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2) From: Larry Johnson
An excellent post, sir. My hat would be off to you, if I wore a hat.
On 10/16/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>
ure into many lives.  Ad multos annos.
<Snip>
out SICA (Seriously Informed Coffee Addict)?  "No thank you.  I am a SICA."=
  when offered Starbucks.  Or,  "I used to like that coffee before I became=
 a SICA."  Not to be confused with sicko.
<Snip>
s.  Basic ignorance, profit margin (cheap beans) and  trendiness thanks to =
the ubiquitous Starbucks.   Where I live (North East USA.....no additional =
info.)  There has been a local coffee roasting/cafe business for years.   T=
en to 15 years ago this was hot stuff where many different coffees could be=
 obtained.  The owner/roaster was into the dark roast thing and seriously o=
pinionated to boot.  Virtually all the glass storage units were dark with t=
he oil sludge that accumulates from that type of roast.  In addition there =
were countless varieties of  "candy" coffees in some of the weirdest flavor=
s.  Even I, ignorant as I basically was in those days, found the basic vari=
etal coffees burnt tasting with little to differentiate them one from the o=
ther except in acidity.  The first thing a new owner of the establishment d=
id was stop the mindless flavor stuff, reduce the number of varietals and "=
lighten up" a bit.  He said to me that he had complaints that there was no =
longer Hazel Nut-Mocha-Irish Creme-Watermelon flavor anymore. He did have t=
hose flavoring extracts for do it your selfers!
<Snip>
t we do know our basics and whatever our real or imagined degree of experti=
se we are light years ahead of most of the Big Roasters.  Just because we r=
oast for ourselves in small quantities does not constitute amateurism.  We =
are "small batch experts".
<Snip>
 to a degree of Enlightenment.   May they have every success, happiness and=
 prosperity!
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

3) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-77--498979431
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On Oct 16, 2007, at 8:17 AM, Bernard Gerrard wrote:
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Utterly NOTHING wrong with being an "amateur" in the true sense of  
the word:  one who does what (s)he does for the sheer love of it.
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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On Oct 16, 2007, at 8:17 AM, Bernard Gerrard =
wrote:
The "amateur" term should not be = indulged in.  Utterly NOTHING wrong = with being an "amateur" in the true sense of the word:  one who does = what (s)he does for the sheer love of it. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-77--498979431--


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