HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Observations on Zassenhaus grinders (22 msgs / 652 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Jim Gundlach
I'm inclined to go overboard on testing and examining things and when  
I decided to get a hand grinder  I bought f four previous generation  
Zassenhaus grinders and three non-Zass ones.  With these I only got a  
consistent grind with the Zass knee Mill and a unbranded turkish  
grinder made in Czechoslovakia. I  passed the three Box Mills on to  
kids and friends who had no grinder or just a week whacker.  On the  
ones I had, the Knee Mill and the Czech made one are the only ones  
that had solid anchors at both the top and bottom of the  rotating  
burr shaft.  My conclusion was that the loose bottom of the grinding  
shaft on the Box Mills was responsible for  producing inconsistent  
grinds.
   In response to the several reports of inconsistent grinds produced  
by the newer Zassenhause grinders, I wonder if any of you who are  
noticing inconsistent grind  have Knee Mills.  Has anyone out there  
bought a Knee Mill, if so can you report on how consistent it grinds?
       pecan jim

3) From: Sean Cary
When I was in Iraq last year I purchased a no kidding Turkish Grinder
made in Turkey from a Turkish vendor outside the PX in Camp Victory,
Baghdad...
I never really intended to use it, but will have to give it a look
over when I get home.  It was like $25.00 or so and I got an
Ibrik/czeve or whatever you want to call it...  (the Turkish folks
called it a cezve)
Coincidentally - I got my hair cut by a Turkish barber today. Strange?
 All that and Nancy Pelosi failed to have our supplies cut off via
Turkey.
Oh well.
Sean
On 10/19/07, Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: James Raven
I commend you Sean for your continued posts from where you are and your app=
reciation of a quality cup of coffee, imagining what must be served as a re=
gular where you are. sorry our people in charge are doing such a lousy job =
keeping you guys supplied with neccessities, like grinders and such for cam=
p roast?
Hava Better Day, & Thanks -  TRULY!!!!   Next duty, find a different grinde=
r?
<Snip>
cribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettingsClimb to the top of the charts! Play Star Shuffle: the word scramble =
challenge with star power.http://club.live.com/star_shuffle.aspx?icid=starshuffle_wlmailtextlink_oc=t=

5) From: Sean Cary
yeah, I am just roughing it...  The Zass is actually pretty good, just
need to find it's sweet spot for my press mug.
Honestly, it really is not bad here in Fallujah, but I refuse to drink
the coffee from the "Coffee Mess" in my shop.  I have been here about
three months, and the coffee maker has not been cleaned yet...we have
no running water in or about the office where I work.  Coffee they
drink is a mix of Folgers, Maxwell House and whatever someone gets in
a care package, all ground up and put into an old Maxwell House
container with a duct taped lid...that says "Good Coffee".
I do get to thankfully travel about - I subsist on Diet Coke and Rip
It when I am "outside the wire"...no amenities in some of the places I
go, and travel is really a PIA here, you can't just hop in the car and
go 9 miles to the next base, you either convoy or fly...for obvious
reasons I choose to fly, so I travel as light as possible.
We have way more then I would choose to have, I would rather have it
tougher to live here and maybe we could get out of here quicker...I am
not looking forward to a 3rd tour in '09.
Sean
On 10/19/07, James Raven  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Zara Haimo
<Snip>
I have a knee mill I got 3-4 years ago from Tom before they stopped 
production.  It rivals my Mazzer Mini for the quality of the grind it 
produces.  Until I bought the Mazzer, it was my daily grinder for both 
espresso and French press.  These days I take it with me on trips, but don't 
use it much at home.  My only complaints about the Zass are:
o The setting tends to wander a bit - I need to pickup some Locktite so it 
won't drift.
o  There are no clear reference markers so you can get easily from one 
coarseness setting to another - I've marked some spots with a permanent 
marker.
o The collection box is awkward for transferring grinds to a portafilter 
basket - I now use a grain/canning funnel between the box and the basket.

7) From: Aaron
I just recently bought one of their turkish grinders.
It takes a bit getting used to, a small change in the knob will make a 
large change in grind coarseness.  So far it has seemed very 
consistant.  I have ran the range from well, shaved chunkies for a drip 
brew to pretty much a powder with the burrs in full contact to try 
something with the swissgold.  (wow was that an awesome cup),  the only 
problem I have to report, which seems to be a zass thing is that the 
setting likes to walk.  Even with the turkish mill and the adjustment 
screw being spring loaded it will still walk.    Yes loctite is a must 
with a zass but otherwise it's a great grinder.
I also have an older one, im told is probably 30 years old or so and it 
works flawlessly as well, a bit more span on the adjustment though it's 
not as sensitive, but fantastic grinder,  however again, it walks....
either way a fine grinder if you can get one
Aaron

8) From: Erik Snapper
How long does it take to grind for a few cups of coffee with the Zass
turkish? I have a turkish grinder (no-brand imported from Turkey) and it
takes me 3 minutes of cranking to grind a mere 10 grams of coffee at a
medium-fine setting. Is that typical?
On 10/19/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Brett Mason
seems like a long time..  Try going more coarse - does the time get better?
Takes me 1 minute to do 2.5 oz. for a 12-cup french press - in my knee mill
zass or my box mill zass....
Regards,
Brett
On 10/19/07, Erik Snapper  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

10) From: Aaron
Erik, I have seen that there are two turkish mill types out there now, 
and one is a bit bigger than the other.
It depends on how fine you are grinding it.  If you are doing a drip 
brew, you can grind fairly coarse and it can go in a minute.  If you are 
grinding finer, then yes a few minutes might be about right.  Nobody 
said they were fast,  if time is an issue, then get an electric grinder.
I got mine for the portability and the snob factor, so that when 
everyone at work sees me grinding my beans by hand, then smells when I 
put the hot water to the grounds, and I take a sip and go Aaaahhh,  now 
THIS is the way coffee is supposed to be, and they smell the lingering 
aroma... it's all worthwhile.
Ahh the speed at which you turn the handle will affect the grind time 
too.. not trying to be a smart ass, it's just the way it is....
aaron

11) From: Erik Snapper
Ok, thanks Brett and Aaron. My turkish grinder is already on its coarsest
setting, which is still relatively fine. Given that I normally have 20-40g
of coffee in the morning, I just didn't want to be cranking for over 10
minutes straight... I'll probably be investing in a Zass turkish or knee
mill for my travel/backup grinder, but my laziness is a factor since about 3
minutes is probably my limit. I crank it at a good speed too :) I just think
this grinder is slow, but wanted to be sure given the price tag on a Zass.
On 10/19/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Robert Joslin
Jim
     I bought one of the newer Zass kneemills from Tom about 3 weeks ago to
replace the one which I gave to a needy drinker a few  years ago.  The new
one delivers a really nice, uniform grind.  I tested several different grind
settings with three brewing methods (no, I didn't try espresso)....all
produced good cups.  The only difference I note between the new one and the
older one is that the new unit seems to me to be about 1/3 larger in size
than my old (30 yr ) one was and of course the new unit is a little stiff
but that will smooth out with more use.                 Happy Roasting
Josh
On 10/19/07, Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Pun intended?  :)
  I bought one of the newer Zass kneemills... which I gave to a needy =
drinker.

14) From: Aaron Scholten
Is this kind of like the movie waterboy where he asks,  umm what part of 
the snake are we eating. ........ snakes really don't have parts but.... 
if I had to name one... id say you are eating his knee.
Aaron
Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Derek Bradford
Interesting observation, Jim.  I've complained bitterly about my Zass,
but it is a box mill.  It does not have a lower burr anchor as the
knee mill does.
--Derek
-- 
Check out my blog: www.blynic.com
Every path but your own is the path of fate.  --Thoreau

16) From: Brett Mason
I am currently refinishing an old Armin Trosser.  The axle is secured top
and bottom, so it should turn out to be a great grinder...
Brett
On 10/20/07, Derek Bradford  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

17) From: Chris Lott
This seems like a difference that people selling Zass grinders might
want to note... I just ordered one a few days ago, thankfully the knee
mill, but I had no idea there was a diff in the mechanism...
On 10/20/07, Derek Bradford  wrote:
<Snip>
c
--
Chris Lott

18) From: Brett Mason
Since I have a Zass knee mill and a Zass box mill, perhaps I can comment...
Neither Zass makes the dusty fines that make coffee bitter.
The axle on the knee mill is supported below and above, making it a bit more
consistent, but not a lot more consistent.
The axle on the box mill is supported above, and kept in place by the mass
of the beans being ground.
Do understand that the Zasses all work by shaving parts of the bean until
the pieces are smaller than the gap between the burrs, and then gravity
takes over and the grounds fall through.  This is true of all conical burr
mills, and also true of vertically mounted disk mills.  The more brittle a
bean (dryer / more fragile), the more likely the bean will fracture into
pieces and fall through.  This of course makes the mill appear to be
unreliable, and inconsistent.  (The same happens when you hit a bean with a
hammer - shatters into variable sized pieces).  The whirley-blade grinder
does the same, only worse, it keeps spinning the grounds, and pulverizes
anything the blade hits...
It's not a problem with the zass - it's a trait.  That's how they work...
Being more diligent on grind technique may reduce the effects of a moving
axle - some may comment - I haven't noticed the problem on my box mill.  But
then, I use it every day and don't even think about it...
Primary criterion:  How's your coffee taste?
Brett
On 10/20/07, Chris Lott  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

19) From: James Raven
I Like your Quote, get to read lots of really appropriate quotes that truly=
 apply to this group. 
How Freakin cool.
Jim
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettingsBoo!Scare away worms, viruses and so much more! Try Windows Live OneCare=
!http://onecare.live.com/standard/en-us/purchase/trial.aspx?s_cid=wl_hotma=ilnews=

20) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-43--110371424
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetNDOWS-1252;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I have a Zass Turkish, and I think I will follow the method proposed  
earlier for ensuring consistency--resetting each time to the true  
zero point. I never use it for espresso, as I have no opportunity to  
do so in my travels; but I do switch between small Swissgold pourover  =
filter cone, paper basket filter (when there's a machine in my hotel  
room), Aeropress and French Press, so my grind varies constantly.
On Oct 20, 2007, at 8:54 PM, David Echelbarger wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-43--110371424
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetNDOWS-1252
I have a Zass Turkish, and I think I will follow the method proposed =
earlier for ensuring consistency--resetting each time to the true zero =
point. I never use it for espresso, as I have no opportunity to do so in =
my travels; but I do switch between small Swissgold pourover filter =
cone, paper basket filter (when there's a machine in my hotel room), =
Aeropress and French Press, so my grind varies =
constantly.
On Oct 20, 2007, at 8:54 PM, David Echelbarger =
wrote:
From:homeroast-admin= s.com [mailto:homeroast-adm= in]On Behalf OfBrett = Mason Sent:Saturday, October 20, 2007 = 3:45 PM To:homeroast= s.com Subject:Re: +Observations on = Zassenhaus grindersSince I have a Zass knee mill = and a Zass box mill, perhaps I can comment... Neither Zass makes the = dusty fines that make coffee bitter. The axle on the knee mill is = supported below and above, making it a bit more consistent, but not a = lot more consistent. Th= e axle on the box mill is supported above, and kept in place by the mass = of the beans being ground. Do understand that the Zasses all work = by shaving parts of the bean until the pieces are smaller than the gap = between the burrs, and then gravity takes over and the grounds fall = through. This is true of all conical burr mills, and also true of = vertically mounted disk mills. The more brittle a bean (dryer / more = fragile), the more likely the bean will fracture into pieces and fall = through. This of course makes the mill appear to be unreliable, and = inconsistent. (The same happens when you hit a bean with a hammer - = shatters into variable sized pieces). The whirley-blade grinder does = the same, only worse, it keeps spinning the grounds, and pulverizes = anything the blade hits... It's not a problem = with the zass - it's a trait. That's how they work... Being more = diligent on grind technique may reduce the effects of a moving axle - = some may comment - I haven't noticed the problem on my box mill. But = then, I use it every day and don't even think about it... Primary criterion: = How's your coffee taste? Brett, I have a box mill and like = it, coffee tastes fine for travel but it will not make espresso because = the burrs are not set right the shaft is not centered correctly. = It is a newer one and did not live up to its = billing. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-43--110371424--

21) From: Brian Kamnetz
Sandy,
I'd be interested in hearing whether you notice differences or not.
Brian
On 10/21/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-57--52430860
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Well, I'm off to MI for a gig next weekend, so I will try it and let  
you know.
On Oct 21, 2007, at 2:23 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-57--52430860
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Well, I'm off to MI for a gig next weekend, so I will try it and let you =
know.
On Oct 21, 2007, at 2:23 PM, Brian Kamnetz =
wrote:
Sandy, I'd be = interested in hearing whether you notice differences or not. On = 10/21/07, Sandy Andina <sandraandina> = wrote: I have a Zass Turkish, and I = think I will follow the method proposedearlier = for ensuring consistency--resetting each time to the true zeropoint. I never use it for espresso, as I have no = opportunity to do so in mytravels; but = I do switch between small Swissgold pourover filter cone, = paperbasket filter (when there's a = machine in my hotel room), Aeropress andFrench = Press, so my grind varies constantly. homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-57--52430860--


HomeRoast Digest