HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Wait on B1600> RE: Snobs sign it please ( Was: Re: +why do commercial roasters roast so dark?) (9 msgs / 592 lines)
1) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Right. I was thinking along the lines of consumer reviews and not the =
beta testers.

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
There are a number of home roast reviewers using the exact same unit as
production model, not beta or pre-production units. Units off the actual
production line in China, just shipped directly by-passing miles and months
of red tape before volume shipments come to market.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Dan Bollinger
Sent: Saturday, October 20, 2007 8:03 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: Wait on B1600> RE: Snobs sign it please ( Was: Re: +why do
commercial roasters roast so dark?)
Right. I was thinking along the lines of consumer reviews and not the beta
testers.

3) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I meant it as a suggestion...  Dan

4) From: Brett Mason
AND That's why they roast so dark!
Just following the Subject line....
Brett
On 10/20/07, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

5) From: Brett Mason
Some of us are non-mod seat-of-the-pants zen types who go by sight, sound,
smell, and gut...  They're not all scientists on the list.
We all make good coffee.  The scientists can tell you all the details!
Brett
On 10/20/07, James Raven  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

6) From: Brett Mason
I hear you James...  I too am amazed at the invention of many here regarding
precision coffee...
But don't mistake the approach for excellence.  There is a similar thread of
people who engross in the experience, and all their management occurs via
the senses rather than via sensors and controls...  For example, you can't
understand roasting until you've done at least one or two roasts in a
totally hands-on manner, such as wok / skillet / HGDB method.  What is
learned there can carry back to the development of precision roasters, but
without that understanding, you're just hoping...
OK, off my soapbox...  Oh, and today I ordered a Sweet Maria's digital
thermometer - the scientist in me might come out as well....
Brett
On 10/20/07, James Raven  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/21/07, Aaron Scholten  wrote:
<Snip>
When I first joined the list, there was a fair amount of discussion
about building large-batch roasters, with a running joke centered on
"jet engine and cement truck". I don't know why, but it made me laugh
every time someone mentioned it.
Brian

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
Oh boy, a chance to disagree with Brett!-)  "...you can't understand
roasting until you've done at least one or two roasts in a totally hands-on
manner, such as wok / skillet / HGDB method."
First I disagree more can necessarily be learned by those methods versus a
popcorn popper or simple Fresh Roast. In fact, being able to have the
process somewhat automatic with simple air roaster highly likely easier for
the beginner to become familiar with what happens during roasting stages
then more manual methods. Then becoming more intimate with the process
through varying degrees of manual roasting makes sense.
Oh, definitely believe it takes not one or two roasts but more like one or
two hundred roasts to 'begin' understanding the roast process. Then around
batch one thousand or so it really starts to sink in how little you know...
I know, didn't really necessarily disagree, but I tried! :-)
PS Another day for mcKona Koffee got started 'late' 'bout 6am, but this one
is going to be a really biggy day!
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Saturday, October 20, 2007 5:55 PM
	To: homeroast
	Subject: Re: Wait on B1600> RE: Snobs sign it please ( Was: Re: +why
do commercial roasters roast so dark?)
	
	I hear you James...  I too am amazed at the invention of many here
regarding precision coffee...
	
	But don't mistake the approach for excellence.  There is a similar
thread of people who engross in the experience, and all their management
occurs via the senses rather than via sensors and controls...  For example,
you can't understand roasting until you've done at least one or two roasts
in a totally hands-on manner, such as wok / skillet / HGDB method.  What is
learned there can carry back to the development of precision roasters, but
without that understanding, you're just hoping... 
	
	OK, off my soapbox...  Oh, and today I ordered a Sweet Maria's
digital thermometer - the scientist in me might come out as well....
	Brett
	
	On 10/20/07, James Raven  wrote: 
		Well Brett, let me put it this way, At least the scientist
types aren't totally terrified of electricity and all the wiring that goes
along with it. That would probably become my first "Coffee Related Fire" and
would take my home to ashes. I just think it's cool what can be achieved
with some wnowledge and some wiring and old useless parts retrofitted to use
for the needed purposes, especially on some old popcorn popper or an old
roaster that would be junk to me might be rectified by some coffee
scientist, engineer, or twiddler with some time. 
		
		Jim
		From: homeroast
		To: homeroast 
		Subject: Re: Wait on B1600> RE: Snobs sign it please ( Was:
Re: +why do commercial roasters roast so dark?)
		Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2007 18:25:44 -0500
		
		Some of us are non-mod seat-of-the-pants zen types who go by
sight, sound, smell, and gut...  They're not all scientists on the list. 
		
		We all make good coffee.  The scientists can tell you all
the details!
		Brett
		
		On 10/20/07, James Raven  wrote:
		
		I don't think it matters to most of the hardcore roasters on
the list, no matter how good the machine is they are going to tweak it to
fit their usage and set up profiles established with other roasters, am i
correct?? Seems like lots of you are motorized, fan adding, wiring psychos
anyway but i appreciate the talent and ability to do those cool things to
such a plain piece of electrical equipment. Det Wired . . . ? 
		
		Jim
		From: danbollinger
		To: homeroast
 
		Subject: Re: Wait on B1600> RE: Snobs sign it please ( Was:
Re: +why do commercial roasters roast so dark?)
		Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2007 18:05:04 -0400
		
		I meant it as a suggestion...  Dan

9) From: Larry Johnson
You got it right, Jim; it is great. I roast with a heat gun / bread
machine most of the time, an IR2 every now and then, but I've still
got an old Fresh Roast 8, a couple of popcorn poppers, and a
whirly-pop pan stashed away for emergencies. This hobby is really some
fun.
On 10/22/07, James Raven  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J


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