HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: apologies and waaay off topic (10 msgs / 437 lines)
1) From: Vicki Smith
I've been pretty much MIA in this group for the past several months. I 
apologize. Most (if not all) of whatever success I have had with coffee 
roasting comes from the information and support I have gotten from this 
group and I take seriously what I feel is my responsibility to 
contribute when I can.
That being said, I have been inactive for some really good reasons. 
There was my wonderful, and long overdue, vacation with my sweetie, 
which involved roasting on beautiful Hornby Island and drinking 
magnificent coffee in some of the most beautiful places in North 
America. I was soooo close to miKe's home town, but felt like this was 
probably not the time to intrude on his life. Now, when he gets his cafe 
up and running, I'll take a trip over the mountains just for that!!
The other thing that happened is that when we got home, there was a 
letter from the government telling me that I had completed the process 
for becoming a citizen and that I was to report for the oath in three 
days time in Calgary (100 miles or so from here). All together, this has 
been a seven year journey, and it was a very big deal for me.
I know that most of my US friends don't really understand why I would 
want to become a Canadian, even after I tell them that I do not have to 
give up my US citizenship to do so. And certainly, as I looked around 
the room and saw that of the 100 people being welcomed into citizenship, 
the overwhelming majority came from countries where they had little or 
no opportunity for economic success or the free exercise of rights we 
too often take for granted here, in both the US and Canada.
Still, it was important to me to be able to vote and be involved in the 
"responsibilities" part of what citizenship is all about. The "rights" 
were mine from the day I got a residency visa.
It was one of the most moving and important days of my life. I only wish 
each and every person in both countries could have the opportunity to 
think deeply about the kinds of things that come up as one ponders 
ponders making a decision to become a citizen. Even though I did not 
come from a land where I was forced to live in fear or in  abject 
poverty, deciding to stand up and become part of Canada in this way was 
very, very special.
I also wanted to that the people on this list who are in our nations' 
armed forces. My stepson got back from Afghanistan about the same time 
Dennis returned to the US. As a mom, watching our adult children take on 
another responsibility of citizenship  can be overwhelming in its own right.
Just saying...
Vicki

2) From: Stephen Carey
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Congratulations on taking the oath.  Others don't need to understand 
it, you do, and that is what counts. Heck, a lot of people probably 
can't even understand why you roast your own coffee.
Very pleased that your stepson returned, as did Dennis.  Though most 
of us don't know each other personally, I feel there is a connection 
and we can feel the angst and pain that others go through, and we 
care what happens.
Again, good to have you back.  Look down the list and you will find 
an interesting thread about your favorite and best, hit the nail on 
the head, thread, which is quite interesting.  Would love to know 
yours, should you desire to share about it.
No matter, you are back and we are glad that is the case.
All the best,
Stephen
At 10:07 AM 10/21/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Congratulations on taking the oath.  Others don't need
to understand it, you do, and that is what counts. Heck, a lot of people
probably can't even understand why you roast your own coffee.
Very pleased that your stepson returned, as did Dennis.  Though most
of us don't know each other personally, I feel there is a connection and
we can feel the angst and pain that others go through, and we care what
happens.
Again, good to have you back.  Look down the list and you will find
an interesting thread about your favorite and best, hit the nail on the
head, thread, which is quite interesting.  Would love to know yours,
should you desire to share about it.
No matter, you are back and we are glad that is the case.
All the best,
Stephen
At 10:07 AM 10/21/2007, you wrote:
I've been pretty much MIA in
this group for the past several months. I apologize. Most (if not all) of
whatever success I have had with coffee roasting comes from the
information and support I have gotten from this group and I take
seriously what I feel is my responsibility to contribute when I
can.
That being said, I have been inactive for some really good reasons. There
was my wonderful, and long overdue, vacation with my sweetie, which
involved roasting on beautiful Hornby Island and drinking magnificent
coffee in some of the most beautiful places in North America. I was soooo
close to miKe's home town, but felt like this was probably not the time
to intrude on his life. Now, when he gets his cafe up and running, I'll
take a trip over the mountains just for that!!
The other thing that happened is that when we got home, there was a
letter from the government telling me that I had completed the process
for becoming a citizen and that I was to report for the oath in three
days time in Calgary (100 miles or so from here). All together, this has
been a seven year journey, and it was a very big deal for me.
I know that most of my US friends don't really understand why I would
want to become a Canadian, even after I tell them that I do not have to
give up my US citizenship to do so. And certainly, as I looked around the
room and saw that of the 100 people being welcomed into citizenship, the
overwhelming majority came from countries where they had little or no
opportunity for economic success or the free exercise of rights we too
often take for granted here, in both the US and Canada.
Still, it was important to me to be able to vote and be involved in the
"responsibilities" part of what citizenship is all about. The
"rights" were mine from the day I got a residency
visa.
It was one of the most moving and important days of my life. I only wish
each and every person in both countries could have the opportunity to
think deeply about the kinds of things that come up as one ponders
ponders making a decision to become a citizen. Even though I did not come
from a land where I was forced to live in fear or in  abject
poverty, deciding to stand up and become part of Canada in this way was
very, very special.
I also wanted to that the people on this list who are in our nations'
armed forces. My stepson got back from Afghanistan about the same time
Dennis returned to the US. As a mom, watching our adult children take on
another responsibility of citizenship  can be overwhelming in its
own right.
Just saying...
Vicki
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
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3) From: Brett Mason
Congratulations Vicki - this is a big and very important step!  If you live
there,a nd plan to do so for a long time, citizenship is a step to more
involvement, more "ownership" of your country, etc.
For me, many years in the provinces of the Philippines have helped me
understand the things I love about my country.  I would that everyone have
the opportunity to think and consider what makes them a citizen, and then
take appropriate steps to embrace it...
Smiles from Iowa for you!
Brett & Debbie
On 10/21/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: Sandy Andina
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No apologies necessary. I have Canadian cousins and my best friend,  
from Nova Scotia, still has not become a US citizen despite having  
lived here nearly 25 years.  Her son enjoys dual citizenship.  There  
is nothing wrong, IMHO, with wanting to become part of a country in  
which you've lived for so long to such an extent that it has become  
part of you.  I didn't know that one could hold dual citizenship  
other than by being born in one country and born to a citizen of the  
other (or, in the case of we Jews, being automatically entitled to  
Israeli citizenship as well, though I don't see myself availing  
myself of the latter). In the case of Canada, we have so much  
heritage and history in common and (except for that abortive little  
"Pig War" in the San Juans) have always been allies except during the  
Revolution.
And despite recent ideological differences, Canadians have fought and  
died alongside Americans in Desert Storm, Bosnia, Somalia and Iraq.
On Oct 21, 2007, at 9:07 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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No apologies necessary. I have Canadian cousins and my best friend, from =
Nova Scotia, still has not become a US citizen despite having lived here =
nearly 25 years.  Her son enjoys dual citizenship.  There is nothing =
wrong, IMHO, with wanting to become part of a country in which you've =
lived for so long to such an extent that it has become part of you.  I =
didn't know that one could hold dual citizenship other than by being =
born in one country and born to a citizen of the other (or, in the case =
of we Jews, being automatically entitled to Israeli citizenship as well, =
though I don't see myself availing myself of the latter). In the case of =
Canada, we have so much heritage and history in common and (except for =
that abortive little "Pig War" in the San Juans) have always been allies =
except during the Revolution.
And despite recent = ideological differences, Canadians have fought and died alongside = Americans in Desert Storm, Bosnia, Somalia and Iraq. On Oct = 21, 2007, at 9:07 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
The other thing that happened is = that when we got home, there was a letter from the government telling me = that I had completed the process for becoming a citizen and that I was = to report for the oath in three days time in Calgary (100 miles or so = from here). All together, this has been a seven year journey, and it was = a very big deal for me. I know that most of my US = friends don't really understand why I would want to become a Canadian, = even after I tell them that I do not have to give up my US citizenship = to do so. And certainly, as I looked around the room and saw that of the = 100 people being welcomed into citizenship, the overwhelming majority = came from countries where they had little or no opportunity for economic = success or the free exercise of rights we too often take for granted = here, in both the US and Canada. Still, it was important to me to = be able to vote and be involved in the "responsibilities" part of what = citizenship is all about. The "rights" were mine from the day I got a = residency visa. It was one of the most moving and important days of = my life. I only wish each and every person in both countries could have = the opportunity to think deeply about the kinds of things that come up = as one ponders ponders making a decision to become a citizen. Even = though I did not come from a land where I was forced to live in fear or = in  abject poverty, = deciding to stand up and become part of Canada in this way was very, = very special.Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-53--55025700--

5) From: Vicki Smith
The dual thing doesn't really work both ways--at least not technically. 
A Canadian who achieves US citizenship is supposed to renounce their 
Canadian. No one checks, and many don't do it, but it is supposed to 
happen that way.
v
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Michael Wascher
As in the US.
The Canadian version is less specific than the US version.
*THE OATH OF CITIZENSHIP (Canadian):*
*From this day forward, I pledge my loyalty and allegiance to Canada and Her
Majesty Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada. I promise to respect our
country's rights and freedoms, to defend out democratic values, to
faithfully observe our laws and fulfill my duties and obligations as a
Canadian citizen.*
In the US you swear to the oath 3 times, before an examiner who specifically
ask if you understand it and its meaning; before an examiner & witnesses
that swear that you have been a resident of the US & attest to your
character (the examiner again discusses the meaning of the oath); and then
at the ceremony at which you are finally granted US citizenship.
Oath of Allegiance for Naturalized Citizens (US):
"I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and
abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state,
or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen;
that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United
States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will
bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf
of the United States when required by *the* law; that I will perform
noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required
by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian
direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely
without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."
In some cases, USCIS allows the oath to be taken without the clauses:
". . .that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by
law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the
United States when required by law. . ."
Yet I've met a number of naturalized US citizens who claim they have dual
citizenship.
--MikeW
On 10/21/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities. Truth isn't." --Mark Twain

7) From: Vicki Smith
Mike, the Canadian government requires that its citizens who have become 
US citizens report to the Canadian consulate, be interviewed, and 
renounce citizenship formally to the government of  Canada. The net 
result is that whatever the person has sworn to do as part of the 
citizenship ceremony, the Canadian government still considers them 
Canadian until this is done. Most folks apparently never go through with it.
v
Michael Wascher wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: MichaelB
On 10/21/07, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
It's not what the individual claims that determines that status; it's what
the countries allow and accept. It's true that individuals can hold
citizenship in more than one country. Doesn't mean the countries involved
recognize and accept that status. It might be quite the opposite. For
example, US immigration officials will tell you something like "If you
declare yourself a national of another country you jeopardize your US
citizenship." The supposed rule of thumb is that if you are a resident of a
country that makes you become a citizen after being a resident for a certain
time period (e.g., Israel), or that you have a compelling reason, the US
will not do anything. But you can live as a resident in Canada forever and
not be required to become a citizen, so you are in jeopardy. IMO nothing to
worry about, but it's there just the same.
--
MichaelB

9) From: Vicki Smith
Well, as  US citizen, I still have to file a US tax return as well as a 
Canadian one. As Canadian taxes are higher, so far I haven;'t had to pay 
taxes to the US whilst earning my living here. There are also 
arrangements in place (and administered by both countries) so that my US 
Social Security are formally blended with Canada Pension benefits, so 
there seem to be lots of arrangements in place for people in my situation.
I have never heard of a naturalized Canadian having their US citizenship 
yanked away. It could happen, but it would probably not be a popular 
move in Ottawa, and no one is particularly interested in rocking that boat.
v
MichaelB wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Larry Johnson
Congratulations, Vicki. I'm very happy for you.
On 10/21/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J


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