HomeRoast Digest


Topic: please define "rest" (9 msgs / 213 lines)
1) From: Larry Selzler
I've seen a lot of reference to "resting".  Some times up 3 or more days.  =
Does this mean you leave it out in the open for that long?  Or do you leave=
 in open for 24 hrs then seal it and let it rest?  I'm just a bit confused.=
 After I roast it I've just put it in a mason jar and put the lid on tight.=
  After joining and reading, I now leave the lid on loose for 12 or so hour=
s.  My question is how long before I put the lid on tight, in general.
 =
Larry 

2) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
A few hours like 4 or 5. Rest depends on type of coffee and personal =
taste. For me and most of my favorites that equates to 4 days post =
roast. But you have to find what pleases you best.

3) From: Brett Mason
For me, resting is placing the beans in a jar, sealing it, and not leaving
it open to oxygen...  I open, spoon some beans, and close it up.
Better precision might be to place one brew-load in a sealed place for 3-4
days, like a valved bag...  Others do this better than me.  But in my
amateur approach, I spoon beans out, trying not to displace the CO2 in the
jar - heavier than O2, th ebeans don't get oxygenated...
B
On 10/27/07, Larry Selzler  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
Rest is what I'll get after we have our Grand Re-Opening the first of the
New Year:-) Yes 3 days or more will be needed! 
However just finished 15 pounds worth our new Ohana Blend now resting for
it's introduction at the Kafe Thursday. IMO 4 to 5 days rest minimum for
shots. Can you believe all roasted doing CCR HotTop back to back batches all
day? Insane yes, ego involved yes, but I'm not going to be having someone
else's Koffee's at our Kafe! Will just appreciate the Bad Boy all that much
more once he's completed, shipped and installed to say the least.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry Selzler
	Sent: Saturday, October 27, 2007 9:52 PM
	
	I've seen a lot of reference to "resting".  Some times up 3 or more
days.

5) From: Homeroaster
Rest is taking a couple of deep breaths after roasting, and before grinding.
It is a term used by roasters in years past to describe staling beans before 
putting them in a can.
Homeroasters picked up on it and now it's become something magical, as if 
there is a level of staling that makes properly roasted coffee taste better. 
I personally think it is a waste of good aromatics and delicate flavors to 
allow them to dissipate over days or even weeks as some have described.
If your homeroast doesn't taste great just out of the roaster, you're doing 
something wrong.
Resting coffee used for espresso has some merit.  This keeps the coffee from 
being overly bubbly when pulling shots.
Everyone is allowed their opinion.  That's mine.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

6) From: Rick Copple
Larry Selzler wrote:
<Snip>
The strict definition of "rest" is how long the beans sit from the time 
you roast them to the time you brew them, irregardless of how long they 
are exposed to the air. So people like the flavor of certain beans so 
many days after roasting than they do, say, one day after roasting. That 
is a taste issue, though as indicated, certain uses like espresso do 
need that longer rest time.
When to tighten the mason jar, Tom says on SM site a minimum of four 
hours to allow gassing to replace O2 with the rest. Any time after that, 
clamp it down until you're ready to brew.
-- 
Rick Copple

7) From: Aaron
Rest basically means letting the beans sit in a container for a while.   
Another way to look at it is to say  'age'...
for the first day don't use a sealed container because the gasses from 
the recent cooking can buildup pressure and cause problems.  after that, 
store them in whatever you want to.    Some folks use vaccuum bags, some 
use mason jars,  others just use plastic bags.
The length of time a bean has to 'rest' depends on the bean really, 
there is no set rule of thumb.   some need only a few days, others like 
kona, need a good week or more at times to really reach their peak flavor.
Aaron

8) From: George
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
REST means that you won't have to roast coffee for that many days since =
you just roasted.  It's usually most desirable to roast the amount of =
coffee that you will drink within a 5 to 10 day period of time.  That =
way you get 5 to 10 days to REST before you have to roast again.  ;-)
GeorgeM

9) From: Larry Selzler
Thanks for the help with "rest".  I will let it "degas", but my wife tends =
to get upset when I "degass"
 
Larry 
----- Original Mess=
age ----
From: George 
To: homeroast=
arias.com
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2007 8:17:13 AM
Subject: Re: +pleas=
e define "rest"
 
DIV {
MARGIN:0px;}
REST mean=
s that you won't have to roast coffee for 
that many days since you just =
roasted.  It's usually most desirable to 
roast the amount of coffee that=
 you will drink within a 5 to 10 day period of 
time.  That way you get 5=
 to 10 days to REST before you have to roast 
again.  ;-)
 
Geo=
rgeM


HomeRoast Digest