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Topic: Filter paper was +Brewers (18 msgs / 568 lines)
1) From: Homeroaster
Psychologically, the brown filters look more wholesome, and good for the
universe.  Eww, yuck, a 'bleached' filter?  No way that can be good for
anything, right?  I believe the opposite is true.  Food grade filter paper
is 'bleached' with an oxygen process, which is not harmful in any way, and
leaves no residual taste or contaminants in the paper.  Brown paper, on the
other hand still has all the paper processing sludge in the paper, and it
leeches out when you brew with hot water.
Do the paper test.  Soak a plain white filter in a cup of hot water.  Soak
an unbleached brown filter in another cup.  Let it soak until the water is
cold.  Take a sip from each and compare.  If you still think the brown
filters taste better, then you go for it.  I'm betting you'll change your
tune.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

2) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
But Ed,
They have gone to the trouble of poking little holes in the brown filters,
or they look like holes. Maybe I better try the test...
Thanks for the heads up...Ed
TerryT
"PS. but the gang does agree with the better taste between the two. Maybe
its the woody flavor they enjoy."
On 11/1/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
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-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

3) From: Edward Bourgeois
Ed    I was visiting Peter @ Terroir a few weeks ago and they did some
similar testing with a number of name brand filters. In general the
natural brown did poorest and the white Filtropia that Tom has did
best. I think the Melitta were second. Ed B.
On 11/1/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
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4) From: Vicki Smith
They also make something called a coffee sock that is made of cloth. I 
found mine at a local health food store. It works well in my pourover in 
place of a #4 paper filter.
v
Edward Bourgeois wrote:
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5) From: Aaron
There's also something called a happy sock, which is filled with 
Happiness????
I think ill pass on the cloth filters.
Aaron
=======================
They also make something called a coffee sock that is made of cloth. I 
found mine at a local health food store. It works well in my pourover in 
place of a #4 paper filter.

6) From: Homeroaster
I wonder if they tested the white Chemex?
Interesting about the Filtropia and Melitta.
I know the Chemex filters have changed a bit over time, since I bought a
new,old stock pack of Chemex filters on Ebay to do a comparison.  The older
ones were a bit stiffer, maybe thicker.  No perceived taste difference, but
the older ones didn't form into the vent/pourspout channel as the new ones
tend to frequently do.  Frustrating.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

7) From: Homeroaster
I don't like the reusable stuff.  Too messy and labor intensive to keep 
clean.  If I were stranded on a desert island, or any island for that 
matter, I would want a brew sock.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

8) From: Justin Marquez
I agree completely with your post.  Some time ago (couple of years), I tried
the brown paper filters.  And then I tossed them out after a couple of brews
using them.  They imparted a really yucky taste to the coffee.  The white
filters do seem to mute the coffee when compared to non-filter style brews
(FP or cowboy coffee for example), but not a lot to me.  Adding a yucky
flavor was someting I could not stand.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 11/1/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
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9) From: Joseph Robertson
Terry,
The woody flavor I can live with, I love the out doors. It's the elements I
can't pronounce that I'm concerned about. Any one know a chemist?
I'm not that serious here, more curious than anything. For now I will stay
with Ed's analysis.
JoeR
On 11/1/07, TERRY TITSWORTH  wrote:
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10) From: Homeroaster
I think woody or cardboard is a great description of the flavor from brown 
filters.  I don't want it in my coffee.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

11) From: David Martin
On 11/1/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
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Those are really insightful comments. I don't use the drip method very
frequently anymore, but I must admit that the filters in my cupboard
are unbleached. I guess I fell victim to the cleverly-marketed myth
that these filters are somehow better quality and more environmentally
friendly. Which doesn't even make sense if I think about it for longer
than two seconds. It's hard to think critically 100% of the time,
which is what one has to do in the Misinformation Age, if one doesn't
want to get duped. Oh well, at least I never fell for the "sugar in
the raw" scam. :-)
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I'm aware of this problem, although I didn't realize it wasn't an
issue for regular bleached filters. Running plain water through the
filter before brewing with it helps, although I don't know if it helps
100%.
-Dave

12) From: raymanowen
Aqua Regia- extremely powerful oxidizer- would bleach Everything out for
you.
Ozone (Highly active oxidizing O3 molecules) might be your final answer. -ro
On 11/2/07, David Martin  wrote:
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

13) From: Justin Marquez
What is the "sugar in the raw" scam?
It is just less-processed/refined sugar.  Either you like or you don't.
They charge more for it, but if you enjoy it, then it is a call you make on
the cost.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 11/2/07, David Martin  wrote:
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14) From: David Martin
Well, OK. I partially retract that. My impression has been that S in
the R is just low quality, incompletely refined sugar cleverly
packaged to appeal to the natural foods set (of which I consider
myself a member, btw). But a few minutes on wikipedia shows that what
they're really selling is turbinado sugar, a perfectly legitimate
sweetener.
Still, I stand by the essence of my point. A lot of clever marketing
is a scam, in that it distracts the consumer from the true aspects of
the product, replacing it with a positive, but false, impression. So,
for example, when you shell out $1.60 for a *$, you're really paying
for the false belief that you're drinking a quality cup of gourmet
coffee, even though you could probably get a better cup at McDonald's.
When you buy unbleached filters, you get a warm fuzzy that doing so
somehow helps the environment and/or yields a better cup. Etc.
S in the R, with the name, and the pseudo-rustic, unbleached
packaging, falls into the same category, even if it is as good, or
better than, regular refined sugar.
Just my 2cents, and please, no offense intended!
-Dave
On 11/5/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
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15) From: Justin Marquez
No question that there is slick marketing involved in the selling of
turbinado sugar.  As it is less refined, it should cost less to make, yet it
sells for considerably more per pound than white sugar.  I happen to like
that flavor, don't use all that much of it anyway, so the additional cost is
justifiable to me - or at least that's my rationalization and I'm stickin'
to it!
You really must admire it when a marketing campaign sells something that
costs less to make for a premium.  I suppose that there IS some additional
cost to make special packaging and there is separate distribution to
consider, but if I had to make a wild guess, I bet their margin is at least
 doubled for "Sugar in the Raw" when compared to the white stuff.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 11/5/07, David Martin  wrote:
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16) From: Tom Ulmer
I suggest sampling a demerara sugar. The brand available at the local market
here, I believe, is a bit less than $4 for a 50 ounce dispenser.

17) From: Sandy Andina
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I use demerara (sometimes called "yellow-D brown") for Irish coffee--I  
muddle it together with the whiskey in the bottom of the cup till it  
makes a slurry, then pour in the coffee and finally spoon some freshly- 
whipped unsweetened heavy cream (whipped only till thick enough to  
float--you should almost still be able to pour it) on top.  I use  
turbinado only if I can't find demerara; and resort to sweetened  
squirt-whipped-cream only when desperate.
On Nov 6, 2007, at 10:58 AM, Tom Ulmer wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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I use demerara (sometimes =
called "yellow-D brown") for Irish coffee--I muddle it together with the =
whiskey in the bottom of the cup till it makes a slurry, then pour in =
the coffee and finally spoon some freshly-whipped unsweetened heavy =
cream (whipped only till thick enough to float--you should almost still =
be able to pour it) on top.  I use turbinado only if I can't find =
demerara; and resort to sweetened squirt-whipped-cream only when =
desperate.
On Nov 6, 2007, at 10:58 AM, Tom Ulmer =
wrote:
I suggest sampling a demerara sugar. The brand available = at the local market here, I believe, is a bit less than $4 for a 50 = ounce dispenser.

18) From: Lynne
I wonder if this is the same as the solid, brown, unrefined sugar they
sell in Mexica shops on the border towns for practically nothing?
Haven't seen it in any of the (many) hispanic markets around here, but
then again, I haven't looked for it...
Lynne
On 11/6/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
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