HomeRoast Digest


Topic: finally roast 50 and more (4 msgs / 410 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Well, it took some time, like a long time, it is just me here at home 
drinking coffee.  Sure, I have given some roasts as gifts, but I 
would like to get better at what I am doing before I give too much 
away, though I have learned that even roasts that I miss the sweet 
spot on by more than I would hope to still is better than any can and 
most people like it.  They also can tell I am getting better.
So my IR2 and I have gotten to roasts 50, 51, and 52.  The last three 
all India Baba Budan - Mandelkhan Estate - wow, what a bean.  I love 
it.  I also have found it a touch forgiving.  My last roast was 
larger than I usually roast and I took the lack of air flow into 
consideration, I was still surprised at how fast it hit its first 
crack, but still, the color is perfect and the early bean crunch 
tastes good.  After a bit of rest it should be quiet good - or so I 
hope for it is a gift.  The first batch I will finish off tomorrow 
morning, the second I will make a decent dent in tomorrow evening 
when I have guests over.  It will have rested a full day and a half, 
which I have found is just fine for this bean.
I started this venture on July 18th, man, it has taken a long time to 
get here.  And, actually, I started well before that for I paid 
attention to this list and others for a full month before buying a 
roaster and my first beans from SMs.  I still have a stash of about 
27 pounds which I want to work down, mostly so I can taste them 
all.  Most are coffees I can't say I have ever tasted and each roast 
provides a special experience.  The work Tom and his team do is 
evident, the sharing you all are willing to do adds to my chances of 
success, and a decent roaster and patience are proving to be more fun 
than I could have imagined.  Sure, I wish I could roast faster, for I 
love it so much, but that would mean giving much more away and while 
most would not call me selfish, I want to taste the work, I don't 
know how else to get better.  I do have my stash of 5 and 10 pounds 
of one kind that I have dialed in on and give as a 
gift.  Occasionally, to a true coffee lover I will give something 
that is totally new to me.  They love that I am willing to share and 
they still are amazed that one can roast their own coffee - now I 
have to get them roasting their own, that would be a win for me.
If I can keep the travel down a bit - more trips this month, stay 
healthy, well I can roast a bit more, I hope.
Thank you all, for trust me, I know that I could not get to my piddly 
little number of 50 some roasts without your generosity of spirit and 
free sharing of information.  No, that is not lost on me at all.  Thank you.

2) From: JoAnne Phillips
Hey Stephen,
You started on July 18th.  I think that is fabulous that you are  
already comfortable with your iRoast and doing well enough to give  
some away.  I started on April 19 of '05 with a Fresh Roast 8 and the  
sampler pack and didn't buy an iRoast until this year!!  I turned out  
many good roasts with that little machine and have kept good records  
and learned from every one, but it has been a long fun road.
This list has helped me learn how to manage the iRoast and now I feel  
comfortable enough to give coffee away.  One of the best things I  
learned was to roast the same coffee and keep everything the same and  
only change one thing and keep good records.  By the time I was about  
five roasts into the bag I was turning out what I wanted and had  
learned how to allow for the slight differences in ambient  
temperature (I roast outside).  At first I tried a different coffee  
every time and I was confusing myself something awful.
Now I'm eyeing a better grinder as the bottom-of-the-line burr  
grinder I bought back in the beginning has dulled blades and I'm  
getting a lot of fines. I'm the only coffee drinker in our home and  
while my husband will take a sip of whatever I'm drinking he never  
takes more than that.  I keep good records of the difference in rest  
days too.  At first I'd grind and drink the next day, but now I know  
I missed a lot of flavor that way.  My other big discovery was the AP.
You are doing just great - you just don't know it.
JoAnne in Tucson
On Nov 3, 2007, at 6:00 PM, Stephen Carey wrote:
Well, it took some time, like a long time, it is just me here at home  
drinking coffee.  Sure, I have given some roasts as gifts, but I  
would like to get better at what I am doing before I give too much  
away, though I have learned that even roasts that I miss the sweet  
spot on by more than I would hope to still is better than any can and  
most people like it.  They also can tell I am getting better.
So my IR2 and I have gotten to roasts 50, 51, and 52.  The last three  
all India Baba Budan - Mandelkhan Estate - wow, what a bean.  I love  
it.  I also have found it a touch forgiving.  My last roast was  
larger than I usually roast and I took the lack of air flow into  
consideration, I was still surprised at how fast it hit its first  
crack, but still, the color is perfect and the early bean crunch  
tastes good.  After a bit of rest it should be quiet good - or so I  
hope for it is a gift.  The first batch I will finish off tomorrow  
morning, the second I will make a decent dent in tomorrow evening  
when I have guests over.  It will have rested a full day and a half,  
which I have found is just fine for this bean.
I started this venture on July 18th, man, it has taken a long time to  
get here.  And, actually, I started well before that for I paid  
attention to this list and others for a full month before buying a  
roaster and my first beans from SMs.  I still have a stash of about  
27 pounds which I want to work down, mostly so I can taste them all.   
Most are coffees I can't say I have ever tasted and each roast  
provides a special experience.  The work Tom and his team do is  
evident, the sharing you all are willing to do adds to my chances of  
success, and a decent roaster and patience are proving to be more fun  
than I could have imagined.  Sure, I wish I could roast faster, for I  
love it so much, but that would mean giving much more away and while  
most would not call me selfish, I want to taste the work, I don't  
know how else to get better.  I do have my stash of 5 and 10 pounds  
of one kind that I have dialed in on and give as a gift.   
Occasionally, to a true coffee lover I will give something that is  
totally new to me.  They love that I am willing to share and they  
still are amazed that one can roast their own coffee - now I have to  
get them roasting their own, that would be a win for me.
If I can keep the travel down a bit - more trips this month, stay  
healthy, well I can roast a bit more, I hope.
Thank you all, for trust me, I know that I could not get to my piddly  
little number of 50 some roasts without your generosity of spirit and  
free sharing of information.  No, that is not lost on me at all.   
Thank you.

3) From: raymanowen
Sir,
I hope you are allowing for the fact that home roasters (the Matcheens) are
designed to see light use, as in, a family of maybe 1.2 coffee aficionados.
If you let someone watch you roast, you're using the roaster as a Teaching
Device, which probably constitutes a warranty violation. The people for whom
you roast might not be aware that, in addition to consuming your green
coffee supply, they are contributing to the early demise of your roaster.
I am well aware or the joy you have in roasting, me too-  I think from the
time you get a home roaster, its days are numbered, and the clock runs down
much faster, if you you use it for a "family" of 2 or 3+. Taxi cabs and
Polizei cars that look like normal passenger cars- are greatly "beefed up"
to take the abuse.
Lacking the government or commercial backing for your roaster, you might
consider the inexpensive alternatives to purpose-built home roasting
devices. Heat guns are designed for paint stripping or floor tile removal.
Coffee roasting is a gimme for real ones that sell for $25 at Homer's Depot
to a c-note at Grainger's.
A Kitchen Aid mixer bowl goes for about $40 at Target, but I could buy an
arm load of Thrift Store Bread Machines for $40.
I hear there's a Hellacious Thrift Store in Orange County, CA. We have four
bread machines, with two devoted to bread use only. We experiment with
different grains ground in blenders added to a whole wheat recipe. Also
dough for Bagels, English muffins, Irish soda bread, pizza and some strange
tortillas!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
When one is not kneading dough, one is agitating coffee beans...
On 11/3/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Stephen Carey
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Ray, I couldn't agree with you more, but on one point.
My friends who I roast for, all but one, insist on paying me for the 
time, coffee and wear on the roaster, which I divide up and put 
toward my stash and toward my next roaster - which, I hope, won't be 
for a while.  I have a number of constraints that limit what I can 
use right now, though who knows what the future may hold.  Besides, I 
love the simplicity of the IR2 as I get to know the various beans.
In time I see something much different, but I am hoping it is truly 
in time - like a year.  Then I will be on here asking for help in 
going the route of so many others.
My problem still comes down to how little I roast at one time and I 
don't want to increase it just to give it away - except to my paying 
friends and that was their idea.  They looked at the IR2 and had the 
feeling it might NOT be a machine for the ages.
But, I believe it has a lot to teach me if I play with the 
profiles.  If I just hit one and don't do much more than hit the cool 
button I fear I won't be getting the best roasts from the bean, you 
know stretching a roast, bringing the heat up faster on certain 
beans, so on.  Then again, I could be wrong.
Stephen
At 09:42 PM 11/3/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Ray, I couldn't agree with you more, but on one
point.
My friends who I roast for, all but one, insist on paying me for the
time, coffee and wear on the roaster, which I divide up and put toward my
stash and toward my next roaster - which, I hope, won't be for a
while.  I have a number of constraints that limit what I can use
right now, though who knows what the future may hold.  Besides, I
love the simplicity of the IR2 as I get to know the various
beans.
In time I see something much different, but I am hoping it is truly in
time - like a year.  Then I will be on here asking for help in going
the route of so many others.
My problem still comes down to how little I roast at one time and I don't
want to increase it just to give it away - except to my paying friends
and that was their idea.  They looked at the IR2 and had the feeling
it might NOT be a machine for the ages.
But, I believe it has a lot to teach me if I play with the
profiles.  If I just hit one and don't do much more than hit the
cool button I fear I won't be getting the best roasts from the bean, you
know stretching a roast, bringing the heat up faster on certain beans, so
on.  Then again, I could be wrong.
Stephen
At 09:42 PM 11/3/2007, you wrote:
Sir, 
I hope you are allowing for the fact that home roasters (the Matcheens)
are designed to see light use, as in, a family of maybe 1.2 coffee
aficionados. 
If you let someone watch you roast, you're using the roaster as a
Teaching Device, which probably constitutes a warranty violation. The
people for whom you roast might not be aware that, in addition to
consuming your green coffee supply, they are contributing to the early
demise of your roaster. 
I am well aware or the joy you have in roasting, me too-  I think
from the time you get a home roaster, its days are numbered, and the
clock runs down much faster, if you you use it for a "family"
of 2 or 3+. Taxi cabs and Polizei cars that look like normal passenger
cars- are greatly "beefed up" to take the abuse. 
Lacking the government or commercial backing for your roaster, you might
consider the inexpensive alternatives to purpose-built home roasting
devices. Heat guns are designed for paint stripping or floor tile
removal. Coffee roasting is a gimme for real ones that sell for $25 at
Homer's Depot to a c-note at Grainger's. 
A Kitchen Aid mixer bowl goes for about $40 at Target, but I could buy an
arm load of Thrift Store Bread Machines for $40.
I hear there's a Hellacious Thrift Store in Orange County, CA. We have
four bread machines, with two devoted to bread use only. We experiment
with different grains ground in blenders added to a whole wheat recipe.
Also dough for Bagels, English muffins, Irish soda bread, pizza and some
strange tortillas! 
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
When one is not kneading dough, one is agitating coffee beans...
On 11/3/07, Stephen Carey
<
steve> wrote:
Well, it took some time, like a long time, it is just me here at home
drinking coffee.  Sure, I have given some roasts as gifts, but
I
would like to get better at what I am doing before I give too
much
away, though I have learned that even roasts that I miss the
sweet
spot on by more than I would hope to still is better than any can and
most people like it.  They also can tell I am getting
better.
So my IR2 and I have gotten to roasts 50, 51, and 52.  The last
three
all India Baba Budan - Mandelkhan Estate - wow, what a bean.  I
love
it.  I also have found it a touch forgiving.  My last roast
was 
larger than I usually roast and I took the lack of air flow into
consideration, I was still surprised at how fast it hit its
first
crack, but still, the color is perfect and the early bean crunch
tastes good.  After a bit of rest it should be quiet good - or
so I 
hope for it is a gift.  The first batch I will finish off
tomorrow
morning, the second I will make a decent dent in tomorrow
evening
when I have guests over.  It will have rested a full day and a
half,
which I have found is just fine for this bean. 
I started this venture on July 18th, man, it has taken a long time
to
get here.  And, actually, I started well before that for I
paid
attention to this list and others for a full month before buying
a
roaster and my first beans from SMs.  I still have a stash of
about 
27 pounds which I want to work down, mostly so I can taste them
all.  Most are coffees I can't say I have ever tasted and each
roast
provides a special experience.  The work Tom and his team do
is
evident, the sharing you all are willing to do adds to my chances of
success, and a decent roaster and patience are proving to be more
fun
than I could have imagined.  Sure, I wish I could roast faster,
for I
love it so much, but that would mean giving much more away and
while
most would not call me selfish, I want to taste the work, I
don't
know how else to get better.  I do have my stash of 5 and 10
pounds
of one kind that I have dialed in on and give as a
gift.  Occasionally, to a true coffee lover I will give
something 
that is totally new to me.  They love that I am willing to share
and
they still are amazed that one can roast their own coffee - now
I
have to get them roasting their own, that would be a win for
me.
If I can keep the travel down a bit - more trips this month, stay
healthy, well I can roast a bit more, I hope.
Thank you all, for trust me, I know that I could not get to my
piddly
little number of 50 some roasts without your generosity of spirit
and
free sharing of information.  No, that is not lost on me at
all.  Thank you.
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