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Topic: OT:so where do canned coffees come from (4 msgs / 199 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Hi all.  I look at what Sweet Maria's has to offer, plus what I have 
in my stash, and as I have said before, so many are new to me - 
almost all of them in their pure form.
I get that on a can of "Columbia Supreme" there are beans from 
Columbia in there - without knowing what the Supreme is all 
about.  The French Roast, I assume are some beans from somewhere 
taken to what they call French Roast and ground.
What I don't see are beans from Rwanda, Sumatra, India, Cameroon, and 
so on.  Maybe these are used in the "blend" (how loosely I use that 
word for I don't know if I know how to make a blend yet).
So, when General Mills, or any large company, goes out to make can 
after can of coffee where do they get it?  It must help the economy 
of the countries they get it from, but I wonder how much.  I also 
wonder if the fact that they are not going for the quality that many 
of us would want Tom to get us, do they hurt the growing and planting 
process, much less the environment.
One thing: I do not want to paint them as the big bad guys.  They 
server a purpose and I travel the world and many people are quite 
content to drink from a big plastic jar of Folgers or Chock Full of 
Nuts - EVEN IN COSTA RICA (that about caused a heart attack when I 
saw a can of Folgers in the Super Mas, which is primarily for 
visitors - even those who rent our house will bring it in though we 
provide fresh roasted coffee weekly at no additional charge.
Anyway, I am wondering how that much coffee is grown and processed 
and where it comes from, that's it.
Thank you,
Stephen

2) From: gin
Stephen:
there are tons of sites like this one where you can get lots of interesting information.http://www.gourmetcoffeeclub.com/cof_facts.htmginny
---- Stephen Carey  wrote: 
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3) From: Stephen Carey
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Thank you, this is the perfect site - somehow I missed it yesterday 
as I tried to put this all together in my head.
Thank you,
Stephen
At 08:21 AM 11/4/2007, you wrote:
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Thank you, this is the perfect site - somehow I missed it
yesterday as I tried to put this all together in my head.
Thank you,
Stephen
At 08:21 AM 11/4/2007, you wrote:
Stephen:
there are tons of sites like this one where you can get lots of
interesting information.
http://www.gourmetcoffeeclub.com/cof_facts.htmginny
---- Stephen Carey <steve> wrote: 
> Hi all.  I look at what Sweet Maria's has to offer, plus what I
have 
> in my stash, and as I have said before, so many are new to me -
> almost all of them in their pure form.
> 
> I get that on a can of "Columbia Supreme" there are beans
from 
> Columbia in there - without knowing what the Supreme is all 
> about.  The French Roast, I assume are some beans from
somewhere 
> taken to what they call French Roast and ground.
> 
> What I don't see are beans from Rwanda, Sumatra, India, Cameroon,
and 
> so on.  Maybe these are used in the "blend" (how
loosely I use that 
> word for I don't know if I know how to make a blend yet).
> 
> So, when General Mills, or any large company, goes out to make can
> after can of coffee where do they get it?  It must help the
economy 
> of the countries they get it from, but I wonder how much.  I
also 
> wonder if the fact that they are not going for the quality that many
> of us would want Tom to get us, do they hurt the growing and
planting 
> process, much less the environment.
> 
> One thing: I do not want to paint them as the big bad guys. 
They 
> server a purpose and I travel the world and many people are quite
> content to drink from a big plastic jar of Folgers or Chock Full of
> Nuts - EVEN IN COSTA RICA (that about caused a heart attack when I
> saw a can of Folgers in the Super Mas, which is primarily for 
> visitors - even those who rent our house will bring it in though we
> provide fresh roasted coffee weekly at no additional charge.
> 
> Anyway, I am wondering how that much coffee is grown and processed
> and where it comes from, that's it.
> 
> Thank you,
> 
> Stephen
> 
>
> homeroast mailing list
>
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4) From: raymanowen
" It must help the economy of the countries they get it from, but
I wonder how much.  I also wonder if the fact that
they are not going for the quality that many of us would want Tom to get us,
do they hurt the growing and planting process, much less the environment."
Big Coffee wants just One Thing: Bottom Line Profit; absolutely Nothing
Else. They help the local economy so much, they have the market cornered to
the extent that they restrain the price on the commodity and I've read some
reports of farmers converting to more lucrative crops that grow like weeds
and don't require endless attention.
Then you have to ask yourself, "Are they going to risk their livelihood on
an extremely labor intensive crop that can be destroyed by inattention at
any point?" We'll cry if we have to pay 50cents more for a pound of beans
that we must have, and their reward is a greater demand and a pittance for
their work.
Education, electric lights, refrigerators, indoor plumbing- do they have any
of this?
"Hey, Dad, I have a date tonight- can I take the mule?"
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
That kind of slavery would be abhorrent in this country, so we export it.
Big Coffee is nobody's friend- and we want to get bigger...
On Nov 4, 2007 1:54 AM, Stephen Carey  wrote:
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