HomeRoast Digest


Topic: RK Drum Question (12 msgs / 334 lines)
1) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Probably a silly question that's been answered many times but I couldn't
find it on RK's website.  I'm considering stepping up to larger capacity
(than iR2) and increasing my knowledge of roasting.  The RK drum appears
to been the majority vote for this (let me know if you feel otherwise).
I'm just wondering, is it undesirable to use a propane BBQ that's been
used for food?   It would probably be difficult, but I would imagine
that one could buy a used grill and steam clean it back down to the bare
metal but I don't know if this is worth the trouble.  Also, if one has a
grill setup does it need to be 100% dedicated to coffee?  Of coarse I
wouldn't want to impart any other flavors to the coffee roast... just
wondering if that's a risk or not.
 
Assuming that it would be best to buy new and dedicate the grill but
just wanted to know if this was a hard requirement.   Also, are there
brands/sizes of grills that are ideal for the RK and highly recommended?
Thanks in advance for your replies.
 

2) From: Terry Stockdale
At 01:00 PM 11/4/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Carlos,
I'm leary of mixing grilling food and roasting 
coffee, but some others have said that it works fine.
With the prices we pay for coffee beans, the $99 
for a cheap gas grill seems to be reasonable 
insurance.  If you look at my RK Drum pages, you'll see my setup.
Terry
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My Coffee Pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffee/rkdrum_roaster.phpMy computer tips site and newsletters:http://www.terryscomputertips.com =">http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffeeMy RK Drum Pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffee/rkdrum_roaster.phpMy computer tips site and newsletters:http://www.terryscomputertips.com =

3) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Carlos, I have several customers that use the same grill for cooking =
food and roasting coffee, and swear there is no transfer of flavors in =
either direction, I can not answer this personally as I have always used =
a dedicated grill for roasting.
Cleaning a used grill that you mentions should be just fine.
I like grills with a low hood profile like the Webber design.
The smaller the roasting chamber the less propane is needed to keep it =
hot, no need for wasted space.
Load size will greatly effect the grill you choose to use.
1 to 2 lbs 30k will be fine
2 to 3 lbs 36k
4 lbs, well let me say that I use a 36k and it needs to run wide open to =
roast 4lbs in the desired 20min target time.
Good luck and I'm sure you will get several suggestion as this list is =
quite useful in all coffee related matters.
Ron Kyle
RK

4) From: Jerry Procopio
I use a dedicated grill for roasting, but mostly for convenience.  I 
don't want to have to remove grates and ceramic briquets every time I 
want to roast coffee, nor do I want to have to put them back in every 
tome I want to burn a steak or dead chicken.  That said, I don't see 
where there would be a problem using a grill that was previously used 
for grilling food to roast coffee in nor do I believe there would be any 
noticeable ill effects using a dual use grill.
I use a 50K btu Fiesta (10K is for the useless side burner) and have no 
problem roasting 6# in 20 - 23 minutes.
Jerry
Mejia, Carlos wrote:
<Snip>
begin:vcard
fn:JavaJerry
n:;JavaJerry
org;quoted-printable:JavaJerry's™ Custom Home Roasted Coffee Beans ;RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
email;internet:JavaJerry
title:HomeRoaster
tel;cell:757.373.3500
note;quoted-printable:JavaJerry's™ Custom Home Roasted Coffee Beans
=
	RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
x-mozilla-html:TRUE
urlhttp://members.cox.net/javajerry/javajerry.shtmlversion:2.1
end:vcard

5) From: Floyd Lozano
Be careful of overbuying in the grill department.  I bought the Target stor=
e
brand (forget the name) grill, a 3 burner 48k btu beast for $180 (or less o=
n
sale).  I have to run only 2 burners of the 3 most of the time to keep the
heat low enough to not blow through the roast too fast, and I'm roasting in
Boston, where it is fairly cool these days.  During the summer days when it
was in the 75-85 range, 2 burners was almost too much for 1lb, and roasting
1/2 lb would have meant one burner.  Just be aware there may be a challenge
if you overbuy on the BTU side - I would definitely say 48k is your max
(though I have yet to see how it performs in the wind and show!)
-F
On 11/5/07, Jerry Procopio  wrote:
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6) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's better to have reserve power than not enough or barely enough power. Be
careful not to under buy!
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Floyd Lozano
Sent: Monday, November 05, 2007 5:17 AM
Be careful of overbuying in the grill department.  I bought the Target store
brand (forget the name) grill, a 3 burner 48k btu beast for $180 (or less on
sale).  I have to run only 2 burners of the 3 most of the time to keep the
heat low enough to not blow through the roast too fast, and I'm roasting in
Boston, where it is fairly cool these days.  During the summer days when it
was in the 75-85 range, 2 burners was almost too much for 1lb, and roasting
1/2 lb would have meant one burner.  Just be aware there may be a challenge
if you overbuy on the BTU side - I would definitely say 48k is your max
(though I have yet to see how it performs in the wind and show!) 
-F
On 11/5/07, Jerry Procopio  wrote: 
I use a dedicated grill for roasting, but mostly for convenience.  I
don't want to have to remove grates and ceramic briquets every time I 
want to roast coffee, nor do I want to have to put them back in every
tome I want to burn a steak or dead chicken.  That said, I don't see
where there would be a problem using a grill that was previously used 
for grilling food to roast coffee in nor do I believe there would be any
noticeable ill effects using a dual use grill.
I use a 50K btu Fiesta (10K is for the useless side burner) and have no
problem roasting 6# in 20 - 23 minutes. 
Jerry
Mejia, Carlos wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Mike Koenig
Carlos,
I go back and forth between meat and coffee on my grill all the time,
with no ill effects whatsoever.  After using the grill for food, I
simply heat the grill on high for ~15 minutes, which turns any food
residue to a nice fine white ash.  I use a Weber, which has steel heat
diffusers above the flame, so I really don't need to do anything to
change over between food and coffee, and the chaff falls through and
out the bottom without much burning.
Now that I'm learning what sort of profiles I need, I'm pretty happy with i=
t.
I live in a townhouse, so I'm limited in what I can keep on my patio,
which is the primary reason I don't have a dedicated grill.
--mike
On 11/4/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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8) From: Jared
I recently got an RK and love it.  I also bought a dedicated grill and thin=
k
if you have the space it is the best move.  After getting the new grill hom=
e
I decided to use the old grill for the coffee roaster.  I just scraped out
any food residue and have had no problems with food smells in the old
roaster.  On a side note.   I have thick but relatively inexpensive welding
gloves  and  two ov-gloves  and much prefer the ov-gloves  to handle the
very hot drum after roasting.  Jared
On 11/4/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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9) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
  miKe,
  How do you think the TEC would work with an RK?
  Mike
  It's better to have reserve power than not enough or barely enough =
power. Be careful not to under buy!
  Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
  www.mcKonaKoffee.com
  URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:
 http://www.mckoffee.com/  Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who =
have gone before.
  Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archives
 http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

10) From: mirrera
I'm with Mike -- my grill also does double duty.  Though new to RK drum roasting (~10 roasts), I haven't seen any ill effects either way, and I use the grill for food several times a week.  Like Mike, I also burn off food residue before using it for coffee.
Given space, I may have gone with a dedicated grill, but I'm roasting on my back porch, which is all the outdoor space I have, so it really wasn't an option.  Plus you'd like to think that after spending $4k on a grill, you would never have to buy another.  
Like Floyd, I'm in Boston, but I'd say that you can't overbuy, as long as what you get is quality.  I can put 90k BTUs onto the beans, so I could turn 4# into charcoal pretty quickly.  But my grill (a 36" DCS) has very good control, so I have no problem stretching 1# to 14 minutes.  I'm not worried about being able to roast in the winter, either (apart from standing in the snow).
I also use OVE Gloves, and they work fine with the drum.  You have to be pretty quick, though, as they start to get hot after 20-30 seconds.  You should be dumping by then, anyway.  The key is that they let you pull that pin relatively easily -- I've heard many times that people have problems with the pin, but I have not.
Though I still like my HG/DB for the intimacy of the roasting experience, I have now drunk the RK Drum Kool-Aid, and will primarily use that for roasting (the drum, not the Kool-Aid).
-AdkMike
 ---------

11) From: Floyd Lozano
Ok, I should have put in this caveat - if you are going to buy a blast
furnace, get a quality one with low end control.  My cheapie grill does not
have this control.  It goes from very hot to supernova.  I suppose you could
achieve this low end control by throttling at the tank (i.e. maybe only open
it up a quarter or half turn), though I am no expert in such things!
The ove gloves are key.  I use them too.  Heed the warnings on dampness - do
NOT get them wet, or you will feel it hardcore when you pick up the drum.  I
still do have occasional trouble with the pin, but if you use needlenose
pliers as RK does, then you should not have an issue.
-F
On 11/5/07, mirrera  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
 
Thank folks for all the great advice!  I don't have much room on my
small deck which is why I was thinking of double duty on my current
grill.  However, I may need to go for a new grill for a couple of
reasons.  I have a Webber with two burners (don't remember the model or
BTUs) that I bought about 6 yrs ago.  It may not be powerful enough to
roast the 2 or 3 lb batches planned.  Also, I notice when I cook on this
grill that it has a definite hot spot in the top right quadrant.  It's
slightly cooler on the top left and much cooler on the front burner
(left and right side).  I'm thinking the left to right temperature
difference could preclude obtaining an even and consistent roast. I
haven't really done any maintenance on the burners and the unevenness
may be something that I can fix or adjust...not sure, but if so it's
probably not hot enough anyway.  So, it looks like I need to find
something in the ~40,000 BTU range.   
 
~carlos


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