HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Kona Konfessions (10 msgs / 219 lines)
1) From: Brett Mason
Alas the day was meant to arrive...  After all my vocal disdain for Konas, I
was just swept off my feet by one!
You guys were right, I was wrong, and seriously uneducated to boot!
Took my wife to lunch at a local cafe, and they served me a cup of their
Kona, from a melitta drip cone...  The coffee was sweet, nutty, and smooth.
This coffee shouldn't have been that good.  They keep all their coffee in
large jars, ground some day in the past.  They put a scoop into a cone
filter, put it over your cup, and pour boiling water through...  Not bitter,
not stale, not burnt, not weak ...  just about perfect!
I humbly repent of my anti-Kona derision...
OK, so what do you recommend for Kona, and how do you recommend roasting
it?
Also, was my assessment of the taste near where you identify Kona as being
in taste profile?
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

2) From: gin
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how do you really know it was kOna at aLL.
It may have bean a kenya left over from a starbucks event in Atlanta?
good lord brett, will you never learn???
ginny
---- Brett Mason  wrote: 
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3) From: Floyd Lozano
I had this experience this morning, with SM's Kowali Typica XF from this
past season, taken to a Cify+ / Full City.  My first little cup this morning
was heaven.  My second cup, horribly disappointing.  You see, I haven't been
keeping my thermos clean, and it really, really wrecked my coffee today.
The fine kona flavors were still there, but so was this nagging rancid
'bought it at the cafeteria downstairs' flavor.
So I gave the stainless steel thermos a soak with some Cafiza, and it
stripped out layers of brown gunk from inside the thermos.  It's like a
mirror in there now!  Sadly, the rubber gasket around the stopper is still a
nasty coffee brown and it smells like an old office coffeepot.  Can anyone
recommend a good cleaning method for this rubber gasket?  the 30 minute soak
didn't seemto do much for the gasket.  Will an overnight soak do any better?
-F
On 11/5/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Aaron
Brett, I sent you some kona to roast and try a year or so ago,  what 
happened, did you eat the beans green or something??
Ill let mikey edumacate you... it'll give him a bit of training in 
dealing with those type of customers who's lips move when the read a 
stop sign :)
Aaron

5) From: Eddie Dove
Brett,
I did have the Hawaiian Kona  Purple Mountain Farm, roasted as
prescribed by Tom and it made a very good cup.  I still have two
pounds of the Hawaiian Kona  Moki's Farm left to roast though ...
perhaps I should roast it this weekend.
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Nov 5, 2007 1:50 PM, Brett Mason  wrote:
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, I
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h.
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er,
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it?
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g
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6) From: Aaron
Take it to city +  some say just into second crack, but it depends on 
the crop and year.....  I find that in this case, without starbucking 
it, it's better to go a little more on the roast, then less... don't 
risk grassy then.
it's drinkable in a day or two but i have found that it hits its peak 
about a week into resting..... then again, since the I roast only does 
5.5 ounce at a time.. by the time a week is up im just about out....
oh and the beans expand a lot, however they have very good movement 
throughout the roast so it shouldn't be a problem.
aaron

7) From: Brett Mason
Hi Aaron,
I enjoyed the Purple Mountain - but I think I may have taken it too dark, or
baked it or something, cause it didn't hit me like it should have.  The
problem wasn't the coffee, was the roasterer....
Was very much appreciated though!
B
On 11/5/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

8) From: David Morgenlender
Floyd,
I've been using a long soak in a baking soda solution, which has worked =
great.
I haven't tried it on a rubber stopper yet.
Dave
On Mon, 5 Nov 2007 17:26:35 -0500, you wrote:
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morning
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been
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still a
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anyone
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soak
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better?
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Konas,
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their
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smooth.
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 in
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bitter,
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roasting
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being
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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9) From: Sean Cary
oxlyclean...  Nasty what comes out.  I have my wife sending me some to
clean my stuff here - amazing stuff.
Sean
93.75 and counting...
On Nov 6, 2007 7:57 AM, David Morgenlender  wrote:
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10) From: Jim Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
    Although I've not roasted any Kona in a long time, all this talk =
about it reminds me that but for Kona I might never have started =
roasting coffee at all.
    When at a convention on the big island a long time ago I rented a =
car and went driving off the tourist routes and stumbled across a small =
shack where a totally unreformed former hippie rented horses to ride on =
an isolated beach.  He fixed us a couple cups of Kona that had won some =
contest the year before, explained to me that the locals could sell =
coffee as "Kona" if it had only some small percentage of genuine Kona =
beans (10 or 18 percent seems to ring a bell but may be totally wrong), =
and explained what I was drinking was 100% Kona.
    He sold me a roasted pound of it to take back to the hotel to drink =
in our room but suggested I try to buy green beans from a local =
plantation when I returned home.
    Upon returning to Texas I received a letter from him with the name =
of a plantation that said they'd be glad to sell and ship to me green =
Kona beans, and for several years I had a regular shipment of 25 pounds =
of Kona peaberry.
    Later I started roasting other coffees and, thanks to eventually =
finding Sweet Marias, have found so many others I prefer that I've not =
had a cup of Kona in years and years.
    But I think I'll buy a couple of pounds now when the new batches =
arrive and bring back memories.


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