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Topic: New Roaster was Re: +First Harbor Freight Heat Gun dead (3 msgs / 73 lines)
1) From: Jim Gundlach
On Nov 5, 2007, at 11:58 AM, David Morgenlender wrote:
<Snip>
David,
       I enjoy using the Heat Gun to roast.  Especially after I got a  
bow mounted to the stirring mechanism of a bread machine.  Hand  
stirring next to the heat got a bit tiring.  I have been through five  
heat guns in my years.  I started with a Wagner (sp?) paint stripper,  
its frame melted from feedback heat.  I then went to a Master Tools   
good solid professional model, it was a bit heavy and my arm would  
start to ache.  Then I got a Milwaukee 8986-20.  It is a great gun, by  
far my favorite.  I picked up the two ten dollar Harbor Freight ones  
just to see how long they lasted.  That is, I got the planning to keep  
track of how long they ran before they died.  One of them does not get  
as hot as it is supposed to and will barely roast half a pound.  It  
has two roasts on it and is still running but I doubt if I will use it  
enough to wear it out.
My current efforts involve using a Sunpentown turbo oven with a 1500  
watt micro carbon fiber heating element on a set of nested stainless  
steel bowls which are in turn  mounted on a modified bread machine for  
stirring.  Once I figure out how to insulate the bowls so I don't lose  
so much heat, I think I will have a two pound roaster that will give  
me good, manual, control over the heat profile for less than $150.   
Cooling is rather neat.  All I do is remove the turbo oven top and set  
a small fan face down in the bowl and the heat and chaff are gone in a  
couple of minutes.  If anyone has an idea on something to insulate the  
bowls with, I would appreciate it.
     pecan jim

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
David,
Jim mentions that Master heatguns are quite heavy. I have a 751b and
it weighs nearly 4 pounds, and has a very long handle that gives the 4
pounds quite a lot of leverage against your hand, with the bottom line
being that it is pretty heavy to try to hold during a roast. I got
around that with a tripod build for hanging kettles over campfires. I
have some photos of my set-up in action and would be happy to send
them to you if you email me OFFLINE. The 751b puts out lots of heat. I
can easily roast a pound at a time but don't often do that. I usually
roast half a pound at at time, because that amount lasts me a week and
I don't want more than that roasted at a time. When I am trying to
ramp up 10 degrees/minute, the heat gun is probably 8-10 inches from
the beans. When I am trying to ramp 30 degrees/minute it is probably
something like 4-6 inches from the beans.
Brian
On Nov 5, 2007 4:09 PM, Jim Gundlach  wrote:
I then went to a Master Tools
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3) From: Justin Marquez
Remember the ol' Western movies....  "Ummm white man build BIG fire, stand
far back.  Indian build small fire, sit close..."
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 11/5/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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