HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Glass chimney for Poppery 1? (10 msgs / 282 lines)
1) From: Randall Nortman
A couple of months ago, I started pushing my West Bend Poppery Mark I
(the original) roasts up to 1/2 lb green.  I had to boost the fan
voltage and also remove the bottom metal plate and elevate the popper
on a wire cooling rack in order to get enough air flow to move the
beans with such a large batch, but it works.  However, with my current
tin can chimney, I'm having two problems: First, toward the end of the
roast when the beans are lighter, a handful of them end up flying out
the chimney.  Second, the join between the bakelite chamber and the
can chimney is far from smooth, and beans are getting caught in there
and not properly roasted.  These are minor problems, but I'd like to
fix them.
I'm interested in trying a glass chimney of some sort.  I bought what
appears to be a glass lamp chimney at a thrift store -- it is
cylindrical rather than the usual hurricane lamp shape, with a cheesy
engraved pattern of swans.  (Hey, it was cheap.)  But it's much too
wide to fit *into* the bakelite chamber, and also too wide to fit over
the cast aluminum base without leaving a gap where beans could
potentially fall through or get stuck.  I just don't see a good way to
attach it.  I think what I really need is something that fits just
right.  Ideally I would actually remove the bakelite completely and
just have the aluminum and glass (plastic and high temperatures really
just don't belong together in my opinion).
Has anybody done this?  Any pointers on where to procure the right
kind of chimney and how to attach it?  I would ideally like to avoid
getting the Dremel out and making any irreversible changes -- these
things are hard to find, and I don't want to end up ruining mine.
Thanks,
-- 
Randall

2) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Randall,
	Mike (Just Plain) of the Dalles, OR (I think that is where he
lives) has a heavily modded Poppery with a tall chute he might be able
to offer so great advice to help with that...
Dennis

3) From: Brett Mason
Try an aluminum "canning" funnel, and modify it as the connector between the
base and the glass.
"Swan Coffee Roastery" - I like it!
Brett
On 11/9/07, Randall Nortman  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: Gary Townsend
Randall,
Check out the most informative discussion on modding a P1 I've ever seen:http://www.homeroasters.org/and register (it's free!). Look for the forum thread on building a coffee
roaster, and click on it.
Once you are there look for the article on Modifying the Poppery 1...
I dunno how fast you can read, but pour yourself a fat cup of coffee, sit
back and enjoy!
Gary
On Nov 9, 2007 2:31 PM, Randall Nortman wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Aaron
I ended up using a campbells soup can with both ends cut out,  made a 
great chimney and was cheap too!!!  and fit perfectly down the pipe as 
well...
umm maybe it wasn't cambells i cant remember anymore but it was a tin 
can....  glass can chip crack, a tin can wont.
aaron

6) From: Brett Mason
What I am using right now - the digital thermometer works great with the PII
and the soup can too!
B
On Nov 9, 2007 6:26 PM, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Wes Tyler
Randall..a glass lamp chimney will solve all the afore mentioned problems with no mods to the P1. I got mine from Hobby Lobby. The base is 3" or 1/16th smaller and the top tapers to 2" and is smooth. I did remove (Dremel tool) the spline from the bakelite chamber down about 1" to let the chimney sit straight. I made a cookie can chaff catcher that works very well. I can see the roast, catch all the beans and catch the chaff. I roast on an enclosed porch and get very little chin music from the Sec'y of War. Hope this helps.
Wes
----- Original Message ----
From: Randall Nortman 
To: homeroast
Sent: Friday, November 9, 2007 3:31:15 PM
Subject: +Glass chimney for Poppery 1?
A couple of months ago, I started pushing my West Bend Poppery Mark I
(the original) roasts up to 1/2 lb green.  I had to boost the fan
voltage and also remove the bottom metal plate and elevate the popper
on a wire cooling rack in order to get enough air flow to move the
beans with such a large batch, but it works.  However, with my current
tin can chimney, I'm having two problems: First, toward the end of the
roast when the beans are lighter, a handful of them end up flying out
the chimney.  Second, the join between the bakelite chamber and the
can chimney is far from smooth, and beans are getting caught in there
and not properly roasted.  These are minor problems, but I'd like to
fix them.
I'm interested in trying a glass chimney of some sort.  I bought what
appears to be a glass lamp chimney at a thrift store -- it is
cylindrical rather than the usual hurricane lamp shape, with a cheesy
engraved pattern of swans.  (Hey, it was cheap.)  But it's much too
wide to fit *into* the bakelite chamber, and also too wide to fit over
the cast aluminum base without leaving a gap where beans could
potentially fall through or get stuck.  I just don't see a good way to
attach it.  I think what I really need is something that fits just
right.  Ideally I would actually remove the bakelite completely and
just have the aluminum and glass (plastic and high temperatures really
just don't belong together in my opinion).
Has anybody done this?  Any pointers on where to procure the right
kind of chimney and how to attach it?  I would ideally like to avoid
getting the Dremel out and making any irreversible changes -- these
things are hard to find, and I don't want to end up ruining mine.
Thanks,
-- 
RandallDo You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

8) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
Hobby Lobby, I never thought to look there.
I am using a Presto PopLite (1400 watts) that the wife found at a
garage sale. It too has a 3" diameter throat (after the plastic top
was removed) and our storm lamps chimney works good. Well, actually I
had to make an aluminum collar to go around the chimneys base to give
it just a touch more diameter.
However the wife was making noises about not being able to use the
lamps if we need them, (been here 25 years and haven't 'used' them
yet) so I have promised to find replacements, for the roaster chimney
that is.
Also, This unit typically finished a roast within 4 minutes AND I use
a 100ft. cord to slow it down. But I get very little movement with a
1/2 cup load, So I am in continual swirl mode with the units base.
Thanks for the tip Wes.
TerryT
On Nov 9, 2007 8:51 PM, Wes Tyler  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

9) From: Michael Dhabolt
Randall,
If you decide to do away with the bakelite section and mount a glass
chimney directly to the aluminum roast chamber casting, you have
several options:
Easiest / cheapest is a lantern chimney with a 3 inch base, you ought
to be able to find them at your local hardware store - be very tender
with the bulged portion - thin glass - fragil - sharp.
Best / most expensive is the 3" Bake A Round tube that can be found on
Ebay and elsewhere sometimes (not real often).  The majority of the
Bake A Round tubes are too large - the small tubes were originally
sold (most of them) as pairs and were good heavy pyrex and the right
diameter (3" O.D.).  These are becoming increasingly rare, and the bid
price usually reflects that fact,  Make sure it is the small diameter
before bidding.
The compromise is a straight tube glass lantern chimney.  I usually
get them from:
Southern Lamp & Supply
4746 US Highway 441 S
Sylva, NC 28779
828-631-3088
their stock # for the clear chimney is CHIM310.
Mike (just plain)

10) From: Homeroaster
Campbell's soup can was what I used 'before' the internet to allow the 
roasted beans to hit the temps they needed to hit and to keep the them from 
flying out the top when I put a decent amount of beans in the roaster.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************


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