HomeRoast Digest


Topic: My Oh My Misty Valley (26 msgs / 1124 lines)
1) From: Vicki Smith
(no Behmor here folks)
I am sipping my first Misty Valley this AM--less than 24 hours after I 
roasted. Oh my. It smelt like candy apples as I ground it (not the 
caramel kind, the hard candy shell kind), and is wonderful in the cup. I 
only ordered 5 pounds of it, and may need to order some more before it 
goes poof for this year.
I roasted it in my bread machine. I have recently been using a technique 
for beans that I want to pull at city/city plus that worked really well 
for the Misty. I have been beginning the roast as usual, but when the 
beans appear to be about 60 seconds or so away from 1st crack, I have 
been lowering the heat gun temp and getting an extra minute or so before 
1st crack begins. I go back into high mode when I want 1st to begin. 
With the Misty, I began 1st at 11 minutes.
The result seems to be that 1st crack itself is more compact--more beans 
*pop* at once. It seems that I am getting more of a true city/city+ than 
I was when the 1st crack period was longer. I was concerned that I would 
lose some brightness and dull the roast by doing this, but, so far, this 
has not been the case. Adding a minute or so into the time before 1st 
does not appear to result in anything baked tasting.
vicki

2) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_266476484==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Enjoy.  I have yet to roast my first, and will be doing it on an IR2, 
but my plans are similar to yours, pulling the temp. down before I 
want the first crack.  It may take me a few roasts to get it right, 
but I can't wait to taste what you taste or to come close to a roast 
of IMV that Dennis sent me - pure heaven.
Congratulations and enjoy.
Stephen
At 08:44 AM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_266476484==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Enjoy.  I have yet to roast my first, and will be doing
it on an IR2, but my plans are similar to yours, pulling the temp. down
before I want the first crack.  It may take me a few roasts to get
it right, but I can't wait to taste what you taste or to come close to a
roast of IMV that Dennis sent me - pure heaven.
Congratulations and enjoy.
Stephen
At 08:44 AM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
(no Behmor here folks)
I am sipping my first Misty Valley this AM--less than 24 hours after I
roasted. Oh my. It smelt like candy apples as I ground it (not the
caramel kind, the hard candy shell kind), and is wonderful in the cup. I
only ordered 5 pounds of it, and may need to order some more before it
goes poof for this year.
I roasted it in my bread machine. I have recently been using a technique
for beans that I want to pull at city/city plus that worked really well
for the Misty. I have been beginning the roast as usual, but when the
beans appear to be about 60 seconds or so away from 1st crack, I have
been lowering the heat gun temp and getting an extra minute or so before
1st crack begins. I go back into high mode when I want 1st to begin. With
the Misty, I began 1st at 11 minutes.
The result seems to be that 1st crack itself is more compact--more beans
*pop* at once. It seems that I am getting more of a true city/city+ than
I was when the 1st crack period was longer. I was concerned that I would
lose some brightness and dull the roast by doing this, but, so far, this
has not been the case. Adding a minute or so into the time before 1st
does not appear to result in anything baked tasting.
vicki
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_266476484==.ALT--

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks, Vicki. I've been tempted to try to slow that part of the
roast, but haven't had the courage to try it yet for fear of baking
the roast.
Brian
On Nov 18, 2007 8:44 AM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
I have recently been using a technique
<Snip>

4) From: Vicki Smith
I'm sure you could bake the roast doing this, but probably not by adding 
in only a minute or so. My goal was a compressed first crack, and this 
seemed to do it.
v
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Linda Reese
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Good morning Stephen, as a word of caution, the IMV produces a great =
deal of chaff!  I recently roasted some in my relatively new IR2 and set =
off the smoke alarm for the first time in almost 2 years of roasting (by =
means other than the IR2).  If I hadn't been next to the machine to hit =
the cool button it could have been disastrous.  The chaff totally =
clogged the machine. That's when the reptilian part of my brain, the =
section that sometimes pulls up useful information but too late to =
totally avoid danger, seemed to recall a warning to back off on batch =
size when roasting high chaff coffees in the IR2.  Perhaps this is a =
warning with which you are already familiar.  I had to back off to =
approximately 100 grams to safely roast the IMV. 
On the plus side, I didn't destroy the roaster and I didn't set anything =
on fire, so all ended well except for that batch of IMV which was pretty =
much incinerated. The IR2 and I have not been a good match; my Behmor is =
due to be delivered this coming Wed., take care, Linda

6) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_272926156==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Thank you, Linda.  I have been given the warning about batch size and 
then making appropriate roasting adjustments.  I will now head even 
more caution.  I have had some roasts that put so much chaff out that 
I worried, but it came just as the roast ended and I was lucky.  One 
person suggested an outdoor roast with the lid off, but I don't think 
that would get rid of enough of it.
I will just take great caution, BUT, I will NOT roast it for 
Thanksgiving.  I am too busy in my life to have to go and find a new 
place to live!!!!
When I do roast it, I will let you know how it goes and how the fire 
department is, should it comes to that - wish that it doesn't!!!!!!
Thank you again for the word of warning.  That is what I love about 
this group.  We take care of each other.
Have a great holiday, Linda.  All the best,
Stephen
At 12:39 PM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_272926156==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Thank you, Linda.  I have been given the warning about
batch size and then making appropriate roasting adjustments.  I will
now head even more caution.  I have had some roasts that put so much
chaff out that I worried, but it came just as the roast ended and I was
lucky.  One person suggested an outdoor roast with the lid off, but
I don't think that would get rid of enough of it.  
I will just take great caution, BUT, I will NOT roast it for
Thanksgiving.  I am too busy in my life to have to go and find a new
place to live!!!!
When I do roast it, I will let you know how it goes and how the fire
department is, should it comes to that - wish that it
doesn't!!!!!!
Thank you again for the word of warning.  That is what I love about
this group.  We take care of each other.
Have a great holiday, Linda.  All the best,
Stephen
At 12:39 PM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
Good morning
Stephen, as a word of caution, the IMV produces a great deal of
chaff!  I recently roasted some in my relatively new IR2 and set off
the smoke alarm for the first time in almost 2 years of roasting (by
means other than the IR2).  If I hadn't been next to the machine to
hit the cool button it could have been disastrous.  The chaff
totally clogged the machine. That's when the reptilian part of my brain,
the section that sometimes pulls up useful information but too late to
totally avoid danger, seemed to recall a warning to back off on batch
size when roasting high chaff coffees in the IR2.  Perhaps this is a
warning with which you are already familiar.  I had to back off to
approximately 100 grams to safely roast the IMV. 
On the plus side, I didn't destroy the roaster and I didn't set anything
on fire, so all ended well except for that batch of IMV which was pretty
much incinerated. The IR2 and I have not been a good match; my Behmor is
due to be delivered this coming Wed., take care, Linda

7) From: raymanowen
"Adding a minute or so into the time before 1st does not appear to result in
anything baked tasting."
I give or take time to suit Yours Truly. Drifting lazily to 1st and beyond,
and stretching 2nd until it goes supercritical is fun roasting. If this is
baked, I'll take baked. Why I roast for the Celtic Marauder that criticizes
everything...
I thought my roast of Liquid Amber blend was pretty good when I stopped it
just as the sleet storm of 2nd started to rip.  The Celtic Critic's comment
on the first double shot of it:
"It's good, Love.*
**But*- why have I had to wait this long for a shot like this???"
"Always learning, my Love- these are the last of an espresso blend that came
on our 34th anniversary. Drink all you want, I'll make more."
Oops- not so fast. I decided to clean the Carpesso between shots, so I'd
brew another with a totally clear shot of hot water. 30 minutes later, I
made it happen. I couldn't believe I got that much gunk and residual brew
out of a machine I had been just heating up and pulling short blanks and
wiping out with a white terry cloth towel since new year's almost!
Finally! Crystal clear and no grounds in the effluent from the Copressa. I
wonder if I could make such a FUBAR design on my own? A built-in mini Hotsy
flash steam boiler for the 2 second auto clean cycle whenever desired after
shots, and the steam wand. Downline from the main shot heater and
independent of it. Also an on-demand individual cup heater, when desired.
FUBAR my way.
BTW- the glass scale says my joystick tamping pressure is 19lb 8oz. I pushed
it up to 20#, but that's higher than normal for me. I was afraid the
wobbling foot was causing fissures in the coffee puck, but the compaction is
a mild settling, not a sharp compression.
This morning's shot was ground at 19, "Best Yet!"
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
I'll keep playing with it. If the grinder turns red, Blame Ginny!
On Nov 18, 2007 6:44 AM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Vicki Smith
It's easy to forget that it's just coffee--not gold. If we try something 
and it doesn't work, but we learned something from it, good on us.
I'm not made of money. I doubt anyone here is. That being said, we're 
all in it for the long haul and having some sub-optimal coffee now and 
again, or even tossing the occasional roast, is really not the end of 
the world.
I turned a friend on to roasting, and the man is sooo timid. I keep 
telling him that the way to figure it out is by learning from those who 
  have gone before us and from both our own successes and our failures. 
I swear, the man had to take a Valium before he tried a new bean for the 
fist six months.
For me, one of the plusses in Bread Machine/Heat Gun roasting was that 
there definitely wasn't *one true way* of doing it when I began. I'm 
pretty sure that is still true.
v
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Larry Johnson
I know that IR2s are not identical, and what works for one will not
work for the other; that said, I have a way of dealing with high chaff
coffees in mine. I keep my Ovglove handy and whenever I feel that
chaff is building to a detrimental level, I twist off the top lid (the
one with the screen. I then "bounce" the floating chaff collector with
a spoon or something, which releases some of the chaff to blown out.
Sometimes I even hook it out of there, dump it, and put it back in
(carefully!). I always take it out for the cooling cycle. I never have
more than a couple of beans escape; usually none. Obviously, YMMV.
On Nov 18, 2007 12:39 PM, Linda Reese  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

10) From: Frank Awbrey
Vicki, do you have a website or blog discussing your bm roasting. I am
seriously considering going to either, the bm or dg method  or the sc/to and
would like to read some about the bm. I have seen a "Trillum" bm at local
thrift store. Anyone know anything about this machine make? Thx in advance.
If anyone has used both the hg/db/bm method and the sc/to (I did pick up a
"free to good home" sc popper Friday) method, could you please give
comparisons to the two roasts? I am wanting to go from the smaller
batch-size pop corn popper to something a little larger, so I only have to
do one or two roasts (batches) a week. Currently, roasting 3 batches of
green beans in my popper takes me an hour+ and only gives me enough drinking
coffee for 4-5 days (two cups a day).
Again, thx,
On 11/18/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

11) From: Vicki Smith
I have some information on bread machine roasting here: http://coffeecrone.com/roasting/faq.htmThere is more information on my site about it--linked from that page.
I haven't done much to go into the small things I am discovering as i go 
along, but there is enough information to get someone started.
Some bread machines work better than others, it seems. I use a Sunbeam 
5891. Even new it is less that $50. It works flawlessly. The same 
machine is also available under the Oster label.
v
Frank Awbrey wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Frank Awbrey
Thx, Vicki, I enjoyed your site. I w/bookmark it for future reference.
On 11/18/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

13) From: Eddie Dove
Yup!  Vicki's website is just like Vicki ... awesome and ever helpful!
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 11/18/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Vicki Smith
Oh blush, Eddie. When I was being interviewed for the Imbibe magazine 
piece, I was very clear about the trailer park nature of my favourite 
roasting method. I'm pretty sure the editors were scared that if they 
had sent a photographer out my way, instead of to you, they would have 
been stuck with a very weird picture.
I feel honoured to be here with folks who can teach me so much.
v
Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Larry Johnson
And you have graciously returned the favor. I originally tried the
HG/BrM method based on what I learned from your site (including your
links) and convo with you. It's my favorite roasting method, though I
still occasionally resort to laziness and use my iR2 when I don't need
a big batch and/or am in a hurry.
Thanks for showing me the way. ;-)
On 11/18/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

16) From: Vicki Smith
I think most of us need a back-up method, no matter what our primary 
roaster/method might be. For some folks, the back-up is a really good 
local professional roaster, for others, another method.
I have not used my IR2 in over a year, but I like knowing it is there. 
If I buy a Behmor next time I will be in the states, I will probably 
Tradition my IR2.
It may seem weird to be waiting for a trip down south, but by the time I 
add in Canadian shipping, duty, and taxes, added cost definitely becomes 
an issue. We go to the US once or twice a year and usually stay long 
enough so that I can bring a purchase this size back duty free.
v
Larry Johnson wrote:
hough I
<Snip>

17) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_350301812==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Vicki, your site really show me what the bread machine/heat gun 
roasting is all about and how it works.  That may be my way one day, 
especially if I ever have to roast more than I do in my IR2 for more 
than just once every six months.  So far I haven't had to other than 
for gifts and that is just two quick roasts.
Once a month I do roast about a pound for my mother, so your way is 
making more sense as I type.  But, for me, I have too much to learn 
to change yet.  You will know when I do.  Great site, thank you for 
your kindness in sharing it.
Stephen
At 05:19 PM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_350301812==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Vicki, your site really show me what the bread machine/heat
gun roasting is all about and how it works.  That may be my way one
day, especially if I ever have to roast more than I do in my IR2 for more
than just once every six months.  So far I haven't had to other than
for gifts and that is just two quick roasts.
Once a month I do roast about a pound for my mother, so your way is
making more sense as I type.  But, for me, I have too much to learn
to change yet.  You will know when I do.  Great site, thank you
for your kindness in sharing it.
Stephen
At 05:19 PM 11/18/2007, you wrote:
It's easy to forget that it's
just coffee--not gold. If we try something and it doesn't work, but we
learned something from it, good on us.
I'm not made of money. I doubt anyone here is. That being said, we're all
in it for the long haul and having some sub-optimal coffee now and again,
or even tossing the occasional roast, is really not the end of the
world.
I turned a friend on to roasting, and the man is sooo timid. I keep
telling him that the way to figure it out is by learning from those
who  have gone before us and from both our own successes and our
failures. I swear, the man had to take a Valium before he tried a new
bean for the fist six months.
For me, one of the plusses in Bread Machine/Heat Gun roasting was that
there definitely wasn't *one true way* of doing it when I began. I'm
pretty sure that is still true.
v
raymanowen wrote:
I give or take time to suit
Yours Truly. Drifting lazily to 1st and beyond,
and stretching 2nd until it goes supercritical is fun roasting. If this
is
baked, I'll take baked. Why I roast for the Celtic Marauder that
criticizes
everything...
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_350301812==.ALT--

18) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'm curious to know what profile you are using on your iR2?  I know that
the machines can vary somewhat but at the same time, the profile not
only controls the heat but also the speed of the fan.  If the fan slows
down too much then the heat can spike.  I've been roasting IMV with my
iR2 for the last couple of weeks and the results are OUTSTANDING.  This
is one of the most wonderful, fruity coffees I've ever had!  I'm
roasting 150g every batch and roasting to a FC to FC+.  The profile that
I use is:
 
Phase I - 360 deg for 5 min
Phase II - 380 deg for 4 min
Phase III - 400 deg for 2 min
Phase IV - 415 deg for 4 min
 
 
This is the profile that I've been using for everything for the last few
months.  I have a thermocouple rigged up so the probe is in the bean
mass and I've been stopping the above IMV roast at 460 deg F which
usually comes at ~10 - 10.5 minutes elapsed. (I hit the cool button
before it goes into the final 4min roast phase).
 
The other important factor might be that I ran one of those dryer hoses
from the top of my iR2 up to the small vent fan on the ceiling of my
utility (roasting) room.  It's not a very strong fan... you can barely
feel the suction at the iR2 end, but I'm sure it has an impact on the
temp profile.
 
Anyway, I just wanted the iR2 folks to know that I'm getting terrific
results on 150g of IMV.   I'd love to hear from anyone who might try to
duplicate this setup and profile.
 
carlos
Linda Reese said....
 
Good morning Stephen, as a word of caution, the IMV produces a great
deal of chaff!  I recently roasted some in my relatively new IR2 and set
off the smoke alarm for the first time in almost 2 years of roasting (by
means other than the IR2).  If I hadn't been next to the machine to hit
the cool button it could have been disastrous.  The chaff totally
clogged the machine. That's when the reptilian part of my brain, the
section that sometimes pulls up useful information but too late to
totally avoid danger, seemed to recall a warning to back off on batch
size when roasting high chaff coffees in the IR2.  Perhaps this is a
warning with which you are already familiar.  I had to back off to
approximately 100 grams to safely roast the IMV. 
On the plus side, I didn't destroy the roaster and I didn't set anything
on fire, so all ended well except for that batch of IMV which was pretty
much incinerated. The IR2 and I have not been a good match; my Behmor is
due to be delivered this coming Wed., take care, Linda 
	 

19) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_483731968==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Carlos,
I have to say that I have not tried IMV 
yet.  Getting there, just not ready, a bit 
nervous.  Glad it has been working so well for 
you, and I will try your profile, if that is okay.
I have about four profiles I tend to use, 
adjusting as I go along, I rely on my sight, 
sound, and smell so much, that I cut some short 
and let some go longer than planned.
I will say that most of my profiles are shorter 
than yours and hit the heat higher near the 
end.  I also roast 155 grams, usually, but it can 
change depending on what I am going for.  I am 
totally exhausted tonight from work and meds, I 
mean just one of those days.  However, it was 
important that I connect with you.  Also, I will 
get you some of my profiles, promise.  Just give me a day or two, okay.
Congrats again on the nice work and on sharing it with us.  It means a lot.
Oh, I use the dryer hose to the ceiling fan and 
it makes a world of difference, it makes the 
machine run line the manual says it 
will.  Seriously.  I will certainly duplicate 
your set up and profile on the IMV and see what I 
get!!!!  I will let you know before I do, either 
on the list of off.  I have to sleep now, I am so 
sorry.  The meds just win sometimes.
Stephen
At 03:48 PM 11/20/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_483731968==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Carlos,
I have to say that I have not tried IMV yet.  Getting there, just
not ready, a bit nervous.  Glad it has been working so well for you,
and I will try your profile, if that is okay.
I have about four profiles I tend to use, adjusting as I go along, I rely
on my sight, sound, and smell so much, that I cut some short and let some
go longer than planned.
I will say that most of my profiles are shorter than yours and hit the
heat higher near the end.  I also roast 155 grams, usually, but it
can change depending on what I am going for.  I am totally exhausted
tonight from work and meds, I mean just one of those days.  However,
it was important that I connect with you.  Also, I will get you some
of my profiles, promise.  Just give me a day or two, okay.
Congrats again on the nice work and on sharing it with us.  It means
a lot.
Oh, I use the dryer hose to the ceiling fan and it makes a world of
difference, it makes the machine run line the manual says it will. 
Seriously.  I will certainly duplicate your set up and profile on
the IMV and see what I get!!!!  I will let you know before I do,
either on the list of off.  I have to sleep now, I am so
sorry.  The meds just win sometimes.
Stephen
At 03:48 PM 11/20/2007, you wrote:
Im curious to know what profile you are
using on your iR2?  I know that the machines can vary somewhat but
at the same time, the profile not only controls the heat but also the
speed of the fan.  If the fan slows down too much then the heat can
spike.  Ive been roasting IMV with my iR2 for the last couple of
weeks and the results are OUTSTANDING.  This is one of the most
wonderful, fruity coffees Ive ever had!  Im roasting 150g every
batch and roasting to a FC to FC+.  The profile that I use is:
 
Phase I  360 deg for 5 min
Phase II  380 deg for 4 min
Phase III  400 deg for 2 min
Phase IV  415 deg for 4 min
 
 
This is the profile that Ive been using for everything for the last few
months.  I have a thermocouple rigged up so the probe is in the bean
mass and Ive been stopping the above IMV roast at 460 deg F which
usually comes at ~10  10.5 minutes elapsed. (I hit the cool button
before it goes into the final 4min roast phase).
 
The other important factor might be that I ran one of those dryer hoses
from the top of my iR2 up to the small vent fan on the ceiling of my
utility (roasting) room.  Its not a very strong fan you can barel=
y
feel the suction at the iR2 end, but Im sure it has an impact on the
temp profile.
 
Anyway, I just wanted the iR2 folks to know that Im getting terrific
results on 150g of IMV.   Id love to hear from anyone who
might try to duplicate this setup and profile.
 
carlos
 
Linda Reese said.
 
Good morning Stephen, as a word of caution, the IMV
produces a great deal of chaff!  I recently roasted some in my
relatively new IR2 and set off the smoke alarm for the first time in
almost 2 years of roasting (by means other than the IR2).  If I
hadn't been next to the machine to hit the cool button it could have been
disastrous.  The chaff totally clogged the machine. That's when the
reptilian part of my brain, the section that sometimes pulls up useful
information but too late to totally avoid danger, seemed to recall a
warning to back off on batch size when roasting high chaff coffees in the
IR2.  Perhaps this is a warning with which you are already
familiar.  I had to back off to approximately 100 grams to safely
roast the IMV. 
On the plus side, I didn't destroy the roaster and I didn't set anything
on fire, so all ended well except for that batch of IMV which was pretty
much incinerated. The IR2 and I have not been a good match; my Behmor is
due to be delivered this coming Wed., take care, Linda 
 
--=====================_483731968==.ALT--

20) From: Brett Mason
Hey Stephen,
You'll like the IMV...
One thing to try is not raising the heat at the end, and instead, letting
the flavors develop more - or so the theory goes.  I think it's correct, bu=
t
you should at least try it out...
Regards,
Brett
On Nov 20, 2007 10:49 PM, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
ll
<Snip>
 go
<Snip>
st
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
oo
<Snip>
tch
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
ity
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
he
<Snip>
her
<Snip>
on
<Snip>
lls
<Snip>
all
<Snip>
he
<Snip>
ad
<Snip>
due
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

21) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_516738703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Thank you, Brett, I will do just that and let the 
flavors come out to where they can taste so wonderful.
At 07:37 AM 11/21/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_516738703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Thank you, Brett, I will do just that and let the flavors
come out to where they can taste so wonderful.
At 07:37 AM 11/21/2007, you wrote:
Hey Stephen,
You'll like the IMV...
One thing to try is not raising the heat at the end, and instead, letting
the flavors develop more - or so the theory goes.  I think it's
correct, but you should at least try it out... 
Regards,
Brett
On Nov 20, 2007 10:49 PM, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote:
Carlos,
I have to say that I have not tried IMV yet.  Getting there,
just not ready, a bit nervous.  Glad it has been working so well for
you, and I will try your profile, if that is okay.
I have about four profiles I tend to use, adjusting as I go along, I
rely on my sight, sound, and smell so much, that I cut some short and let
some go longer than planned.
I will say that most of my profiles are shorter than yours and hit
the heat higher near the end.  I also roast 155 grams, usually, but
it can change depending on what I am going for.  I am totally
exhausted tonight from work and meds, I mean just one of those
days.  However, it was important that I connect with you. 
Also, I will get you some of my profiles, promise.  Just give me a
day or two, okay.
Congrats again on the nice work and on sharing it with us.  It
means a lot.
Oh, I use the dryer hose to the ceiling fan and it makes a world of
difference, it makes the machine run line the manual says it will. 
Seriously.  I will certainly duplicate your set up and profile on
the IMV and see what I get!!!!  I will let you know before I do,
either on the list of off.  I have to sleep now, I am so
sorry.  The meds just win sometimes.
Stephen
At 03:48 PM 11/20/2007, you wrote:
I'm curious to know what profile you ar=
e
using on your iR2?  I know that the machines can vary somewhat but
at the same time, the profile not only controls the heat but also the
speed of the fan.  If the fan slows down too much then the heat can
spike.  I've been roasting IMV with my iR2 for the last couple of
weeks and the results are OUTSTANDING.  This is one of the most
wonderful, fruity coffees I've ever had!  I'm roasting 150g every
batch and roasting to a FC to FC+.  The profile that I use is:
 
Phase I  360 deg for 5 min
Phase II  380 deg for 4 min
Phase III  400 deg for 2 min
Phase IV  415 deg for 4 min
 
 
This is the profile that I've been using for everything for the last
few months.  I have a thermocouple rigged up so the probe is in the
bean mass and I've been stopping the above IMV roast at 460 deg F which
usually comes at ~10  10.5 minutes elapsed. (I hit the cool button
before it goes into the final 4min roast phase).
 
The other important factor might be that I ran one of those dryer
hoses from the top of my iR2 up to the small vent fan on the ceiling of
my utility (roasting) room.  It's not a very strong fan you can
barely feel the suction at the iR2 end, but I'm sure it has an impact on
the temp profile.
 
Anyway, I just wanted the iR2 folks to know that I'm getting terrific
results on 150g of IMV.   I'd love to hear from anyone who
might try to duplicate this setup and profile.
 
carlos
 
Linda Reese said.
 
Good morning Stephen, as a word of caution, the IMV
produces a great deal of chaff!  I recently roasted some in my
relatively new IR2 and set off the smoke alarm for the first time in
almost 2 years of roasting (by means other than the IR2).  If I
hadn't been next to the machine to hit the cool button it could have been
disastrous.  The chaff totally clogged the machine. That's when the
reptilian part of my brain, the section that sometimes pulls up useful
information but too late to totally avoid danger, seemed to recall a
warning to back off on batch size when roasting high chaff coffees in the
IR2.  Perhaps this is a warning with which you are already
familiar.  I had to back off to approximately 100 grams to safely
roast the IMV. 
On the plus side, I didn't destroy the roaster and I didn't set
anything on fire, so all ended well except for that batch of IMV which
was pretty much incinerated. The IR2 and I have not been a good match; my
Behmor is due to be delivered this coming Wed., take care, Linda 
 
-- 
Cheers,
Brett
http://homeroast.freeservers.com
--=====================_516738703==.ALT--

22) From: Vicki Smith
When I was using my IR2, I found the "letting the flavors develop" part 
difficult with beans I wanted to roast to C or C+. It may just have been 
my particular roaster, but slowing down the time to 1st crack was hard. 
Knowing when 1st had ended was also hard.
v
Stephen Carey wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Larry Johnson
I have the same problems, Vicki. When I use the iR2, I have to do
trial and error about 160 grams at a time. Fortunately I am hacking
away at stash reduction, so I don't mind missing a roast by a little.
I'll just tweak the profile and roast again. Not tossing anything,
though; sometimes I blend them, sometimes I alternate between them in
brewing. It's helping to learn what the different roasts are really
like on a given bean.
On 11/21/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

24) From: raymanowen
"When I was using my IR2, I found the "letting the flavors develop" part
difficult... It may just have been my particular roaster, but slowing down
the time to 1st crack was hard.
Knowing when 1st had ended was also hard."
I wanted one of the I-R's myself until questions like "...for X coffee, how
many scoops can I use, which button do I push and for how long?" became
common.
You obviously did the right thing by returning some electric appliances to
their native use!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Nov 21, 2007 7:19 AM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

25) From: an iconoclast
On Nov 18, 2007 5:13 PM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
Great site, Vicki.  HG/BM is an option for us to replace HG/DB/BBQ.
Especially if we can roast at least 1.5 lbs at a time. I bookmarked
your site for future reference.  Good work.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

26) From: Vicki Smith
I was going to suggest it to you Ann when I read about your arthritic 
hands. 1.5 pounds is not a problem in my machine.
v
an iconoclast wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest