HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Turkey Safety SOS; Was +BBQ Turkey for Thanksgiving (34 msgs / 767 lines)
1) From: Lynne
O.K., I'm hope you guys can help me. I opened my turkey (defrosted in the
fridge, just like you are 'sposed to do) to put it in a brine.
Wish I had a camera, but I don't - parts of the turkey (what seems to be the
fat near both ends) are a greyish tan color! UGH - there is no smell, but
I'm don't want to poison my boys or myself.
I was thinking that just exposure to air could have caused this, but looking
at it, it seems to be (forgot the term) the part that is between the breast
and fat - but can't tell.
I have no car, and this was a donated turkey - so I don't know if these
people kept the turkeys under the best possible condition. Not to mention
that most of the turkeys in the stores are frozen, and tomorrow is
Thanksgiving!
What do you guys think? (My BP was skyrocketed high my last two dr visits -
trying not to get stressed!)
Lynne

2) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
Lynne,
You can try the turkey hotline, I'm sure they will be able to answer
your questions.
Safety first!  Hope your turkey is OK.  Maybe all you have to do is
trim off the gray parts.  Then be sure to use that thermometer to make
sure the meat cooks to the proper temp.
Have a happy and healthy Thanksgiving!
Bonnie P.
 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854)
This is the USDA Hotline, the Food Safety and Inspection Service
From their websitehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_111407_01/index.aspFSIS' virtual representative Ask Karen is available to provide food
safety information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at AskKaren.gov.
Consumers can also contact the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline with food
safety questions. Food safety experts are available year-round from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time to answer questions (English and Spanish).
On Thanksgiving, the Hotline is open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time.
The toll-free number is 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854). Recorded
messages are available 24 hours a day.

3) From: Lynne
Hi Bonnie -
Yeah, I tried that - was on hold for a long time. Had to go to school
(in the computer lab now).
I don't want to take any chances - I think I'll make lasagne instead -
I have all the ingredients, plus some frozen Italian sausage patties
that will make the meat-lovers (the guys) happy.
You know, I've cooked LOTS of poultry in my day, but this is a first -
I'm wondering if the bird was diseased. That's very common in the
industry - yuck, one of the things I learned in food safety class
before I transferred out of the class.
Lynne

4) From: Jared
If I was a betting man I would guess it is frost bite but agree that a
turkey hotline is the best plan of action.  You don't want uncle Sal
coming to dinner.  Jared

5) From: Brett Mason
Just me ...
Pitch the turkey, buy a new one not frozen, and get back on track with a
good known source...
You CAN try bowling across the kitchen floor a few times, prior to throwing
it out - they slide really well....
Brett
On 11/21/07, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

6) From: Floyd Lozano
like you i would have been very cautious but for what it's worth,
rotting poultry has a very distinct smell, as does most stuff that is
rotting.  it's probably nothing bad, and if it was just me i would
probably cut off the affected part and roast away, but with a kid or
2, i'd never take a chance!
On Nov 21, 2007 11:44 AM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Floyd Lozano
I rescind my earlier statement.  apparently when a bird goes bad, it
can happen quickly and there's no guarantee you'd actually smell it.
safety first.  turkey bowling!
-F
On Nov 21, 2007 12:47 PM, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: gin
Lynne:
packaging can do that. you turkey is fine, could be some freezer burn,  brine that baby, cook and enjoy.
ginny
---- Lynne  wrote: 
<Snip>

9) From: gin
Lynne:
packaging can do that. you turkey is fine, could be some freezer burn,  brine that baby, cook and enjoy.
ginny
---- Lynne  wrote: 
<Snip>

10) From: Lynne
OK, I conferred with my son ("Why are you asking ME?" "Because the only ones
who eat meat here are you, me, & your brother - and he's not here!").
First, we decided to toss it. Then, after we thought about trekking out into
the Wild World of Right-Before-A-Holiday Grocery Store this afternoon, by
bus, no less - and after he said "SAUSAGES (all I have in my freezer) do NOT
substitute for TURKEY!!"), we decided that we are going to be brave & cook
it. (Thought of the Simpsons episode, Homer: " I'm going right downstairs,
unfold the couch, unroll the sleeping ba- uh, goodnight.")
There is no smell - it's been refrigerated since I brought it home. I'm
probably just worrying too much.
It looks good otherwise - I'll pray over it for added insurance.
:P (it's now in a brine solution)
Thanks Gin & everyone! I'll let you know if I survive!
Lynne
On Nov 21, 2007 1:26 PM, gin  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: javafool
Lynne,
I think you received a lot of great advice on the turkey. I wanted to =
second
or third the temperature. 
Please make sure the bird is thoroughly cooked and it will put the odds =
way
in your favor. When cooking 
in an oven, I always used a cooking bag (thoroughly floured) and the =
bird
seemed to cook more quickly and 
evenly.
Happy Holidays to all,
Terry
Quote:OK, I conferred with my son ("Why are you asking ME?" "Because the
only ones
who eat meat here are you, me, & your brother - and he's not here!").
First, we decided to toss it. Then, after we thought about trekking out =
into
the Wild World of Right-Before-A-Holiday Grocery Store this afternoon, =
by
bus, no less - and after he said "SAUSAGES (all I have in my freezer) do =
NOT
substitute for TURKEY!!"), we decided that we are going to be brave & =
cook
it. (Thought of the Simpsons episode, Homer: " I'm going right =
downstairs,
unfold the couch, unroll the sleeping ba- uh, goodnight.")
There is no smell - it's been refrigerated since I brought it home. I'm
probably just worrying too much.
It looks good otherwise - I'll pray over it for added insurance.
:P (it's now in a brine solution)
Thanks Gin & everyone! I'll let you know if I survive!
Lynne

12) From: Aaron
Id not worry too much.  The bags they come in are not the greatest.  It 
can get freezer burnt, among other things.  trust me, if the bird went 
bad, you'd smell it immediately upon thawing.  The chances of only part 
of the bird going bad as in.. bad to make you sick, are slim, it'd be 
the whole thing.  Excessive freezing might make the flavor off but not 
make it unedible on a health scale.
At worse, if it is freezer burnt or 'dried out' you will taste it, and 
just throw that bit away and enjoy the rest of it.  If you smoke it, the 
'edges' will be 'extra crispy' to begin with generally so again, enjoy 
the gobbler and good eatin.
Aaron

13) From: Jared
Your Turkey is fowl.

14) From: Larry Johnson
I think you should just wing it.
On Nov 21, 2007 11:57 PM, Jared  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

15) From: Jim Carter
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
too chicken to drum up anything more offensive than "Get the flock outa 
here!"
Happy Thanksgiving, all.
-- Jim Carter
Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Lynne
hahahaha - it's 2:14 am & I just finished baking the pies (my usual...)
thanks for the bad jokes. Hopefully my turkey will turn out better (ha)
Happy Thanksgiving!
Lynne (very tired)
On Nov 22, 2007 12:46 AM, Jim Carter  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then
get busy and find out how to do it."
Theodore Roosevelt

17) From: Aaron
So if the dead turkey came back to haunt you,  would that be a poultrygeist?
Aaron

18) From: Lynne
Thanks Terry, Aaron & everyone else who wrote to me - just wanted to thank
all of you.
I brined the bird, and checked the baking times for a 16 lb turkey. Checked
the temp - according to my digital thermometer, it was done - VERY done - an
hr & half before we were supposed to eat. Great.
But it didn't look done to me, (I'm used to cooking huge turkeys - the skin
wasn't dark & crispy, and the wing didn't separate like it should), so I let
it cook longer, but I still had it out of the oven for awhle before we ate
(was ready to panic about leaving it out too long, but there was nothing I
could do.)
It was all needless worry - it turned out delicious, no one got sick & we
had a terrific day.
Just in case it was a failure, I whipped together homemade lasagne
w/homemade pasta. Made this last Christmas & my kids went crazy over it
again.
Hope everyone else had a terrific holiday also!
Lynne

19) From: Brett Mason
Well done!
Our outdoor BBQ in the Weber was a fiasco, but turned out the best turkey we
have ever had...  I struggled with getting the charcoal to go and keep
going, until I doubled up on the briquets and then it was all flames!
Indirect heat to the bird eventually worked, but the slow start meant a 6PM
dinner.  The brine worked magically, and once I took the charred skin off,
we had the best turkey we have ever had!
Coffee wasn't bad too!
Brett
On Nov 23, 2007 5:33 AM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

20) From: Lynne
Oh, man - how I wish I could do BBQ here - that sounds heavenly.
Most of our holidays used to end up hours late on a regular basis -
something like that is def. worth waiting for!
Oh, yeah - I realized yesterday morning that I forgot to roast coffee for
the day. So I ended up roasting two batches (I wanted to give some to my
daughters to take home, too - past holidays no one wanted coffee). Surprise
- two did, and even more surprise - it was still good (would have been
better with a longer rest, but better than they get on a reg. basis).
I gave my oldest daughter a belated birthday gift, too - I found a
discounted French Press I found in Marshalls - huge one (good for her & her
roommates) in pink (then I forgot to give her the beans I roasted - I'm sure
she'll return soon for them). She loved it.
Lynne
On Nov 23, 2007 6:47 AM, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Lynne
hahahaha
On Nov 22, 2007 6:43 AM, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Aaron
Good news there.  Glad the turkey worked out for you there.   BBQ and 
especially smoking, is very forgiving with a turkey.  The only hitch is 
that to do it right with a smoker can take a LONG time,  plan on all day 
as you have seen.  Get the temps up, and even though the skin may look 
dried out, charred, burnt in some cases, the meat underneath is going to 
pretty much fall off the bone it will be so tender and juicy.
Oh, and for next thanksgiving, here's another one of my favorite artery 
cloggers for those who deep fry their turkeys.   When it is done deep 
frying, throw corn on the cob in the oil and deep fry that,  just takes 
a few minutes and is waayyy delicious...
Aaron

23) From: Robert Gulley
Lynne
Homemade pasta! Aahh . . . since you must have leftovers of that 
lasagna anyway . . .
Love to hear of people making homemade pasta, grinding their own 
hamburger, making their own breads etc.; it must be part of the same 
gene that drives us to roast our own coffee. I call it the "quality gene!"
Since my wife was diagnosed with MS I have been taking over all of 
the cooking duties (love to cook anyway) and have equipped my kitchen 
to make a lot more homemade things and we enjoy it so much.
Glad to hear the turkey came out okay - hope you were able to keep 
the stress down to a manageable level!
Cheers!
RG
At 06:33 AM 11/23/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

24) From: Lynne
Robert -
I would be so happy with a life where I could grow all my own veggies &
fruit, make all my food from scratch (wait - I do that anyway)... thought it
was a latent hippie in me, but I agree - it goes right along with roasting
our own coffee. (Best gift I received in a long time - a friend passed on a
cast iron pot, complete with cover, to me - I bake bread, roast meats
(although I am leaning more towards a vegetarian diet - again - for health
reasons) in it. It's the kind that's made for camping, with legs, so if I
ever go camping (haven't in umpteen years), I'm all set.
I'm sorry to hear about your wife's MS. Cooking is such a great way to show
one's love - these diseases (which seem to be more prevalent these days...
maybe it just seems so) can be so frustrating.
Our day was wonderful yesterday. Actually there was no stress - amazing,
huh? My kids & I had the best day ever - had lots of food for both the
carnivores & vegetarians. Starting to realize that most of our stress in the
past came from certain individuals that are no longer a part of my life. I
wish them well - just want them to stay far away!
Lynne
P.S. I found this link a year ago - helped me refresh my mind on making it
again. Thought I'd pass it along, just in case anyone was interested (I used
semolina, which I get in Boston's North End [our 'Little Italy'], but in the
video they use regular flour). Man, it is SO easy... took no time at all,
and wow, does it impress!http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-fresh-pastaOn Nov 23, 2007 9:29 AM, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all> wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Larry Johnson
We also had a nice day yesterday, but my cooking efforts went almost
unnoticed. My daughter has come down with tonsilitis (which we are
fighting with Advil, vitamin C, and salt-water gargles until she can
see the doc on Monday), my son and his girlfriend had the noon meal at
girlfriend's mother's house, so they were still stuffed when they
showed up at my place. Good thing I kept it small.
There were two big hits, even with the lack of appetites; the chipotle
smashed sweet potatoes (Alton Brown's recipe) and the devil's food
cake with peanut butter frosting (my mom's recipe). Also; since I
wasn't cooking a monster feast, I had time to pimp my Kitchen Aid
mixer. Those of you who are curious can take a look at
www.myspace.com/lilboybrew.
Oh, and I enjoyed alternating between cups of CR Tres Rios - La
Magnolia (FC+) and Ethiopia Misty Valley (FC) brewed in my French
press. Roasted a lb of Brazil Morenhina Formosa for my son to take
back to Macon with him.
Glad to hear from those who had a nice holiday. This list feels more
and more every day like an extended family.
Happy holidays, all.
On Nov 23, 2007 10:07 AM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

26) From: Larry Johnson
Sorry, it appears that only MySpace members can view pics on another's
MySpace page. My bad.
If you're a member of Facebook, I also posted the pics there under
"Pimped Kitchen Aid". If you're not a member of either MySpace or
Facebook, you're still not missing much. Just a Kitchen Aid mixer with
some flame decals. No biggie.
On Nov 23, 2007 1:53 PM, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

27) From: Robert Gulley
Lynne
Cast iron is the best for so many things - I regularly use it for a 
lot of things - some you might not think of like french toast (makes 
the best french toast going!). Cast iron is just finiky about heat, 
but once you get the hang of it it really works great. Oddly enough I 
have yet to make chili in it - I have a nice doutch oven that would 
work well - but since things have to be well-seasoned for acidic 
foods like chili, I just got in the habit of using other pots for 
that when I first got my cast iron-ware.
We have moved more and more to "growing our own" where possible - 
just can't stand the thought o processed foods and preservatives any 
more. I am not a health food person by any means, but I think half of 
what's wrong with people's health today is the cr*p they put in 
packaged foods. Guess it's a control issue ;-); that's why I like 
roasting my own coffee, making my own pizza, and canning my tomatoes.
Cheers!
RG
At 10:07 AM 11/23/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

28) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Glad to hear it came out well .  Reminds me of my first try at turkey many
years ago when microwaves were just being popularized.  I thought it was
such a cool way of cooking that I tried it for my Thanksgiving turkey.  A
real disaster, that ended up tasting fine.  Byt the time I finished the meat
was falling off the bones; but people were chewing the bones! This year my
daughter's long time boyfriend was in charge of the turkey; organic turkey
that was fried.  The frying is much better than I expected; just a hint of
flavor from the oil, slightly moist; really once I got the idea of frying
out of my head it was really just about perfect.  A very nice dinner with
our two families. And, I give myself a little pat on the back for the
coffee, which notwithstanding the mediocrity of my beans -not from SM-was
still pretty good.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Lynne
Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 7:12 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: OT: Turkey Safety SOS; Was +BBQ Turkey for Thanksgiving
Oh, man - how I wish I could do BBQ here - that sounds heavenly. 
Most of our holidays used to end up hours late on a regular basis -
something like that is def. worth waiting for!
Oh, yeah - I realized yesterday morning that I forgot to roast coffee for
the day. So I ended up roasting two batches (I wanted to give some to my
daughters to take home, too - past holidays no one wanted coffee). Surprise
- two did, and even more surprise - it was still good (would have been
better with a longer rest, but better than they get on a reg. basis). 
I gave my oldest daughter a belated birthday gift, too - I found a
discounted French Press I found in Marshalls - huge one (good for her & her
roommates) in pink (then I forgot to give her the beans I roasted - I'm sure
she'll return soon for them). She loved it. 
Lynne
On Nov 23, 2007 6:47 AM, Brett Mason  wrote:
Well done!
Our outdoor BBQ in the Weber was a fiasco, but turned out the best turkey we
have ever had...  I struggled with getting the charcoal to go and keep
going, until I doubled up on the briquets and then it was all flames!
Indirect heat to the bird eventually worked, but the slow start meant a 6PM
dinner.  The brine worked magically, and once I took the charred skin off,
we had the best turkey we have ever had! 
Coffee wasn't bad too!
Brett

29) From: Dave Kvindlog
I'll never forget one of my earliest Boy Scout campouts with my son.  One o=
f
the experienced Assistant Scoutmasters decided to roast a turkey in a
cardboard oven.  Made a fancy oven with a chimney.  You can guess what
happened.  The turkey was roasting nicely when he had a chimney fire.  The
entire oven went up in flames.  The rest of the adults groaned when we all
drug the flaming remains into the nearby pond to extinguish the fire.  The
boys each had their own nice patrol dinners, but ours was headed to the
pond.  One heroic Scouter saved the hot turkey, scorching his own hands in
the process, and we rebuilt the oven -- much smaller and simpler this time
-- and after washing off the turkey we did finally get to enjoy a fine
dinner after all.  (But no coffee.  Bummer.)
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
On 11/24/07, MSMB  wrote:
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30) From: Brett Mason
Wowsers!  Good to have saved the Turkey...  Did they line the box with foil=
,
or did they miss that part?
We have recently upraded the coffee solution for the Troop 560...
Brett
On Nov 24, 2007 12:50 AM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
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 6PM
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ff,
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

31) From: Homeroaster
I roast over the campfire with a small solid drum I made, and brew, usually 
the next morning.  I use a Melitta pourover, and heat the water in a big 
stainless pot.  I use a stainless percolator with the guts removed to dip 
into the larger pot and pour hot water over the grinds.  I can make pot 
after pot with this.
To grind the beans, there are two options I use.  One, if cars are parked 
near the campsite, a power converter plugged into the cigarette lighter 
hole, and a small electric grinder.  The other way is to use a small brass 
Turkish grinding mill set on the coarsest setting possible (to get a regular 
grind).  The second option works well for camping if no electricity is 
available (preferred method of camping), but grinding for a pot is a time 
consuming activity.  I usually grind the night before, next to the campfire, 
as a relaxing and meditative activity, rather than in the morning with all 
the chaos of keeping caffeine starved adults waiting for their brew.  A 
small tradeoff, but not really.  Homeroast the night before and preground 
that evening is a factor of 100 or more better than what most people drink 
on a daily basis.  No one complains, and I get to be the designated 
'coffeeguy'.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

32) From: Dave Kvindlog
Sounds like a great operation!  Pictures?  Would love to see both your
roaster as well as your coffee brewing mods.
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
On 11/24/07, Homeroaster  wrote:
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33) From: Dave Kvindlog
Oven lined with foil?  Of course!  But I think he didn't completly cover th=
e
chimney in foil, which of course foiled the entire operation...
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
On 11/24/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
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34) From: Robert Gulley
"And the walls came a tumbling down"!
At 01:18 PM 11/24/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
rias.com 
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 it.
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  


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