HomeRoast Digest


Topic: I feel like I am missing out!! (16 msgs / 654 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
I love my IR2, it is only about 3 months old.  I have 60 roasts and 
toasted only one, when I fell asleep (I know, stupid).  I can easily 
detect the cracks, that has been something I have always been able to 
do, distinguish sounds.  I can see and smell the beans; and besides 
the profiles I love writing and testing, I use my senses deeply with 
each roast.
I can get, assuming the machine keeps working another 2 years from 
this machine, learning the entire time, every roast is a lesson.  I 
am having so much experimenting and enjoying and giving great coffee.
The size of the roast chamber is perfect, because it is just me 
drinking the coffee.  Once a month I do three roasts in a day for my 
mom's monthly quota.  I do two roasts a day for some friends some 
times, but they like tasting all of the great beans so they usually 
want the 155 grams I usually roast.
But, with the Behmor out there I feel like I am missing out on 
something.  I don't have a smoke problem due to the dryer hose, don't 
even turn off smoke detectors anymore.  And, yes, the batteries are 
good.  But I feel like I am falling behind.  One day, after I learn 
all about beans, what they want in a roast, what I like in a roast, 
all of it, I think I want to go to an outdoor drum, but even then, I 
don't know if I can roast the amounts I roast.
I am torn, get a Behmor after only three months because it seems 
everyone got one and love it - and I am sure it is great - or put my 
ego away and keep learning.  Try new beans, work to dial in to the 
best possible roast.  I owe Dennis a holiday roast and I am 
scared.  How does someone give someone as talented as Dennis a roast 
he won't cringe at - well, he won't, he is too polite, but still ....
Am I the only one going through this?  I got over needing every bean 
Tom gets for us so I can get my stash down to a manageable size, now 
I have to get over "roaster envy" and knowledge envy.  After all the 
IR2 stands a full 13.5 inches when assembled, nothing to sneeze at.
Do any of you feel this way when new stuff comes out?  Or have I been 
inhaling too much of the smoke?

2) From: Larry Johnson
I'm there with you Stephen. I have a whirly-pop, a Fresh Roast 8, an iR2,
and a HG/BrM rig. Now I'm lusting over the Behmor. I am wrestling with some
of the same issues as you. I feel like I have more roasters than I know how
to use already, why get another? I feel like a kid when a hot new toy hits
the stores. "But, mom; all my friends have one! Why can't I?"
I've made up my mind to wait. I really don't need yet another appliance in
the kitchen, or anywhere for that matter. I get roasts that I'm very happy
with from my HG/BrM and my iR2. I guess if the iR2 dies, I'll probably get a
Behmor. Until then, I'll just read about all the fun the other kids are
having with the newest toy on the market and sigh.
It is tempting though, isn't it?
On 11/21/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

3) From: Sean Cary
wait it out - roasting coffee is the goal, how you do it does not matter.
Hell, I am going 7 months w/o even roasting, and will be MORE the
happy to go back to my dhbolten roaster and my SC/TO...  The goal is
roasted coffee, not the roaster!
Drinking some beans that the Waschers roasted for me...and feeling
really guilty since I ate almost an entire BOX of pfferneus last night
(I have been on a workout/diet routine that almost has me back to a
sixpack at 40!...so I departed from my Spartan ways for a bit...oh
well).
Roast with your IR until it dies and THEN get a new roaster.
Sean
77 to go until I leave this lovely part of the world for the 3rd time.
On 11/22/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
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4) From: Robert Gulley
Stephen
Same issues - same roaster, same "tool lust." I am learning, however, 
to be patient. And to be content. and to find joy in the contentment. 
Not always been the case. I have only had my IR2 for about 2-1/2 
months, about 35-40 roasts so far, and SO much to learn. But I love 
the coffee, and I love the joy it brings my wife.
I think the IR2 makes the process more personal right now, which is 
what I need as I learn. The bohmer is more a set it and forget it 
roaster (obviously with room to twiddle as Les is sharing with us). 
For now the sound doesn't bother me of the IR2, it has been 
rock-steady so far, and I am getting fairly repeatable results. I 
know the day will come when I get the bohmer or the next great thing, 
but for now, I like "the little IR2 that could."
Cheers -
Robert RG
At 10:22 PM 11/21/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

5) From: Brett Mason
Great discussion folks!
Make sure your decision is based on improving your results.  If there is a
roast profile you can't hit, or a size limitation you can't meet, or an
environmental need you can't meet, then consider whether another roaster
will meet that.  But if you are meeting your needs, and your coffee
exsploration is all about the next bean, you're likely in the right place...
I have been feeling the same about espresso machines.  A week ago I picked
up a used 15-bar pump machine for $25.  It's not a vivalde.  It won't HX or
E-61.  It makes great cappos, and decent espresso.  I have learned enough
the hard way to understand temp surfing, and I am surfing the temp into very
drinkable macchiattos, espressos, americanos, etc.
So fight the urge, unless specific features and benefits bring you specific
value.  Apart from that your wallet will be lighter and your results may
disappoint...
2 scents (roasting and grinding)
Brett
On Nov 21, 2007 10:57 PM, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all>
wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

6) From: Aaron
Stephen, if you are the only drinker, then the I roast is probably all 
you need,  But, the I roast does 5.5 ounces at a shot,  ideally....
the behmore can do half a pound 8 oz,  or 1/4 pound  4 oz, and you can 
go inbetween there at any bit you want and manually adjust the time 
too...  it can also do a full pound (christmas presents)...
You never stop learning, the roaster is just a tool.  Ive been hearing 
for a few years that drum roasted beans have an entirely different 
personality over fluid bed roasted (air popped)... now I finally get to 
try it myself.
The thing you have to ask yourself is, do I REALLY need it, or even want 
it badly, or is it going to be an 'impulse' buy. and not really do much 
different for me.   It is a significantly different roaster though,  
drum versus air pop.  If you had a Hot top, and an RK, and then wanted 
to get this one,  in that case Id say, ok it's approaching overkill, you 
already have two other drum roasters but since you don't... in my mind, 
it's a very justifiable purchase. 
Being an 'only drinker' of coffee sometimes doesn't stay that way.  
Friend A loves your coffee, and you give him some,  sister loves it and 
wants some,  guys at work like it... next thing you know, you are going 
through 2 pounds a week for an 'only drinker'.....  The I roast can only 
do limited numbers of  roasts.  I believe 2 in one day, 5 a week is 
their posted limit???  It has changed over time, but still you are 
limited to 5 a week without risking premature ageing of the unit.  The 
drum units, you can pretty much do unlimited (within reason) back to 
backs. The Rk is not going to die, the hot top claims to be able to 
handle an all day roasting marathon and I talked to mr Behm and he said 
that his unit in prototyping did a LOT of back to back roasting with no 
ill effects.
Personally I can't tell you how to spend your money, but will say if you 
do get a Behmor, it won't be a waste of money, and no it's not ego, you 
are trying to learn, and this is an entirely different method of 
roasting over the I roast,  you will learn a lot about coffee you 
weren't exposed to with an air roaster.
Aaron

7) From: Phil Bergman Jungle Music
Aaron,
I own an IR2.  Although this machine is somewhat unpredictable and finicky,
I have learned its quirks and produce a nice roast with it.  I am intrigued
by your statement that the results are different with an air roast and a
drum.  This interests me.  It's quite apparent from everyone's comments that
the Behmore does a bigger volume, is a nice machine and will probably be
dependable.  But could you please comment on the resulting roasted beans
between the two (air vs drum) and the cupping.  Does the drum roaster
produce a better coffee?  I've seen people mention this before like it's an
evolution toward a machine that produces cupping.  Awaiting your word on it.
Thanks.
Phil

8) From: Stephen Carey
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Good catch.  I meant the part of the roaster is different.  They 
learn new things.  I still can't tell what the major differences are 
over the types of roasting on the bean, though one person told me 
that my IR2 dried out the beans (?)   Misstatement on my part, 
speaking of what one does to make it roast, maybe needs to learn, etc.
I have never used a drum roaster - part of my envy - so I don't know, 
but I trust Tom's results to be pretty much for any roaster he then 
sells, so I feel I am save and I don't think I am drying the bean out 
with the roasts I do, though I could make charcoal, by falling 
asleep, as I have done.  And I can do that on any roaster when 
working my hours at times, I would reckon we most could.
So, Phil, excuse the error, wasn't saying what I wrote (sounds like a 
politician a bit)!
At 09:36 AM 11/22/2007, you wrote:
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Good catch.  I meant the part of the roaster is
different.  They learn new things.  I still can't tell what the
major differences are over the types of roasting on the bean, though one
person told me that my IR2 dried out the beans (?)  
Misstatement on my part, speaking of what one does to make it roast,
maybe needs to learn, etc.
I have never used a drum roaster - part of my envy - so I don't know, but
I trust Tom's results to be pretty much for any roaster he then sells, so
I feel I am save and I don't think I am drying the bean out with the
roasts I do, though I could make charcoal, by falling asleep, as I have
done.  And I can do that on any roaster when working my hours at
times, I would reckon we most could.
So, Phil, excuse the error, wasn't saying what I wrote (sounds like a
politician a bit)!
At 09:36 AM 11/22/2007, you wrote:
Aaron,
I own an IR2.  Although this machine is somewhat unpredictable and
finicky,
I have learned its quirks and produce a nice roast with it.  I am
intrigued
by your statement that the results are different with an air roast and
a
drum.  This interests me.  It's quite apparent from everyone's
comments that
the Behmore does a bigger volume, is a nice machine and will probably
be
dependable.  But could you please comment on the resulting roasted
beans
between the two (air vs drum) and the cupping.  Does the drum
roaster
produce a better coffee?  I've seen people mention this before like
it's an
evolution toward a machine that produces cupping.  Awaiting your
word on it.
Thanks.
Phil

9) From: Aaron
I don't see how it really could dry out the bean to the point that it is 
detrimental unless you went a long long time, I mean you heat it to 400+ 
degrees to roast it, Id think any method would dry it out really when 
you look at it that way,  drying out is part of the act of roasting 
it..  If you take too long to roast it, you can cook the bean, and it 
gets a flat taste, but with air roasters, the problem tends to be that 
it can roast too quickly.  ie a full second crack is easily possible in 
around 5 minutes in some circumstances.  Many claim that is roasting too 
quick, and after tasting the beans I have done that with, I have to agree.
Either way, my typical I roast cycle runs about 7ish to maybe 8 minutes 
TOPS.  generally right around 715 to 730 minutes.  I hold the beans 
right on the threshold of first crack generally for about 30 seconds to 
a minute depending on the bean, or just let it into first, then ramp the 
heat and let it rip for the final minute or two until the cracks die 
down and its getting close to second.  I rarely take my beans into 
second of any significance, with some, just letting it touch second 
before hitting the cool button.
That's one thing I am learning with the behmor.  There's a lot of heat 
mass in half a pound or a full pound of beans, and even though you hit 
cool, they have enough energy to run a bit longer, where the I roast can 
pretty much halt the cooking / snapping process within a few seconds of 
hitting cool.
Either way, I had my first cup of drum roasted this morning, and Hmm,  
very good,  better than I roast, no but just as good I think.
Aaron

10) From: Sandra Andina
I bought one not just for the wow factor, but because friends (who  
used to expect wine) now expect homeroasted coffee as hostess gifts  
from me, and my family has become a colony of java junkies (even my  
"any-port-in-a-storm" son who formerly resorted to hotel-room coffee- 
packs in a 4-c. Mr. Coffee when necessary has begun to expect the real  
thing). The SC/TO is a tad unwieldy (and requires rejiggering my  
entire stove-surround area and laying down foil all around to attempt  
to contain the chaff), and my i-Rs can get smoky and stall out  
unpredictably if one load is a little heavier than the next despite  
what my gram scale says.  The ability to bang out 1/2-lb to a lb. at a  
time several times a day is extremely appealing.
On Nov 22, 2007, at 5:40 AM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina

11) From: Les
This has been a great discussion.  I have had several modified air popcorn
poppers, an I-Roast, a Hearthware Precision, HG/DB, 2 Androcks for roasting
over fire, and a RK drum.   I have roasted on several Hottops and other
roasters in the past 22 years.  I have roasted on a Probat, Sivetz 4 kilo
air roaster, and a couple of Dietrichs.  Now I have added a Behmor.  I have
had excellent roasts from all of these roasters.  I bought a Behmor because
Thor Tamper is offering them, and I thought I had better do some roasting on
one.  What has pushed me to the Behmor is that it is an excellent entry
level roaster.  It is well made, and customer service as many have expressed
is and will be excellent.  It does what it is designed to do well.  It does
not have the power and flexibility of the RK drum.  Robert Gully talked
about "tool lust."  I think we can all fall into that trap.  I think it is
important to learn how to roast and take your roast to its limits before
thinking an upgrade will automatically improve your roasting skills.  One of
the exercises that improved my roasting was learning how to roast over an
open fire with the Androck.  Everything is variable when you are roasting
over fire.  Just think about it or better yet, try it!  I will confess I did
start a roast on fire!  Coffee beans burn real hot!  Some of the best coffee
I have ever had has come from Mike McKoffee and Alchemist John.  They used
very different roasters, but they both know and understand the roasting
process.  The best roasts will always come from someone who understands the
process and the bean they are roasting.  What helps is having a stable and
measurable as well as repeatable roasting tool.  The Behmor provides that
with limited flexibility.  You don't need a thermometer cause you can't
change it, the Behmor doesn't have that flexibility.  You have to pay for
flexibility.  Since I have had the opportunity to work with some commercial
roasters I have come to appreciate the flexibility that goes along with
their power and stability.  So, I have bit the bullet and am going all out
and I should have one of these arriving in January,http://www.usroastercorp.com/sample.htmLes
On Nov 22, 2007 10:00 AM, Sandra Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Wow an 88 pound baby. Without a mid-wife. I am impressed. Can I be G-d =
Father? Congratulations.

13) From: Eddie Dove
Les,
Heartily agree!
Learn the coffee bean(s) ...
Learn how to roast the coffee bean(s) ...
Learn how to use the appliance(s), tool(s) of choice ...
Roast the coffee bean to perfection with the tool of choice ...
YOU are the roaster ...
Congratulations on the acquisition of your new tool!
Happy Thanksgiving!
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 11/22/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brett Mason
Nice - now I have 2 roasters to lust over...
Brett
On Nov 22, 2007 12:44 PM, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

15) From: Brian Kamnetz
Sandy,
Have you had a chance to try your Behmor yet?
Brian

16) From: Sandra Andina
Yes, Brian--works like a charm with a shorter learning curve than the  
i-Roast.  See my posts on the list.
On Nov 23, 2007, at 12:52 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina


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